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Dave Bloke

Keith, Darts!

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Posted (edited)

Just heard that London Fields, written in 1989, set in 1999, filmed in 2013 might actually get released at the fag end of 2018. What other films have suffered such a long delay? Something from Orson Wells maybe?

back in 2015 when it was set to premiered at the Toronto film festival the Grauniad panned the movie's poor direction and wooden acting.

Edited by davidg

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, davidg said:

Just heard that London Fields, written in 1989, set in 1999, filmed in 2013 might actually get released at the fag end of 2018. What other films have suffered such a long delay? Something from Orson Wells maybe?

back in 2015 when it was set to premiered at the Toronto film festival the Grauniad panned the movie's poor direction and wooden acting.

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote took Terry Gilliam 29 years to make

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man_Who_Killed_Don_Quixote

Edited by Virgil Caine

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Richard Attenborough oringally wanted to cast Alec Guinness in 1964 in the part of Ghandi.

John Houston took about 40 years to make 'The Man Who Would be King' - originally Spencer Tracey and Cary Grant were cast, then Clarke Gable and Humphrey Bogart. Followed by Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas. Then Richard Burton and Peter O'Toole before he finally got the money to make it and Caine and Connery [;ayed the leads.

 

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My school had a film club. Year on year, scene by scene, it made the 'school film', about a schoolboy falling off a ladder.

One problem being, each year the person playing the lead part was replaced by a new actor for that year's scene.

The other problem being that everyone in the film wore school uniform and were more or less indistinguishable, apart from the wildly changing haircuts..

The result was totally incomprehensible, but would probably be surreal enough to win some obscure European film award.

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2 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

My school had a film club. Year on year, scene by scene, it made the 'school film', about a schoolboy falling off a ladder.

One problem being, each year the person playing the lead part was replaced by a new actor for that year's scene.

The other problem being that everyone in the film wore school uniform and were more or less indistinguishable, apart from the wildly changing haircuts..

The result was totally incomprehensible, but would probably be surreal enough to win some obscure European film award.

sounds like that film about Nazis taking over England that took years to make. It could happen here - or somesuch.

Of course now the SJW Nazis have succeeded.

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7 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

My school had a film club. Year on year, scene by scene, it made the 'school film', about a schoolboy falling off a ladder.

One problem being, each year the person playing the lead part was replaced by a new actor for that year's scene.

The other problem being that everyone in the film wore school uniform and were more or less indistinguishable, apart from the wildly changing haircuts..

The result was totally incomprehensible, but would probably be surreal enough to win some obscure European film award.

Posh cunt.

My school could only afford a cling-film club.

Wasn't a bad idea with hindsight.

Year on year, and layer by layer, we did stay noticeably fresher...

;)

 

XYY

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50 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

Richard Attenborough oringally wanted to cast Alec Guinness in 1964 in the part of Ghandi.

John Houston took about 40 years to make 'The Man Who Would be King' - originally Spencer Tracey and Cary Grant were cast, then Clarke Gable and Humphrey Bogart. Followed by Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas. Then Richard Burton and Peter O'Toole before he finally got the money to make it and Caine and Connery [;ayed the leads.

 

Great film 👍

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2 hours ago, davidg said:

Just heard that London Fields, written in 1989, set in 1999, filmed in 2013 might actually get released at the fag end of 2018. What other films have suffered such a long delay? Something from Orson Wells maybe?

back in 2015 when it was set to premiered at the Toronto film festival the Grauniad panned the movie's poor direction and wooden acting.

Än appropriate role for her, I think Mr Depp would agree.

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4 hours ago, The XYY Man said:

First conceived in 1982, it was 1996 before "Our Friends In The North" hit the screens of BBC2.

Fucking amazing piece of British television...

Far fetched plot, unknown actors that have never been seen again, and the final episode end credits had some obscure Manchester hippy tune.

 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Bedrag Justesen said:

Far fetched plot, unknown actors that have never been seen again, and the final episode end credits had some obscure Manchester hippy tune.

 

I assume that comment is tounge-in-cheek Beddy.

Christopher Eccleston and Mark Strong never heard of again...? Aye, that'll be right.

And of course no-one has seen jack-shit from Daniel Craig since then either.

Even Peterlee's Gina McKee is famous beyond South East Durham these days.

That "Don't Look Back In Anger" hit number one in the charts almost as those final credits rolled was the final triumph of a remarkable piece of television.

And while the young Anthony Cox smashing-up the chief-constable's allotment was among many a far-fetched scene, the fact that you can see the house I lived in at the time lets me forgive some of the more unlikely twists and turns of the story.

The much maligned BBC took some risks making this show - and it was well worth it. To me if you are waxing lyrical about the best dramas they have produced over the years, then OFITN is up there with I Claudius and the rest of them.

And their recent "A Very English Scandal" with Hugh Grant playing Jeremy Thorpe shows they can still produce quality drama if the mood takes them...

 

XYY

 

Edited by The XYY Man

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5 hours ago, Bedrag Justesen said:

Far fetched plot, unknown actors that have never been seen again, and the final episode end credits had some obscure Manchester hippy tune.

 

Top trolling, my man!

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3 hours ago, The XYY Man said:

And their recent "A Very English Scandal" with Hugh Grant playing Jeremy Thorpe shows they can still produce quality drama if the mood takes them...

That was very good!

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11 hours ago, The XYY Man said:

Posh cunt.

My school could only afford a cling-film club.

Wasn't a bad idea with hindsight.

Year on year, and layer by layer, we did stay noticeably fresher...

;)

 

XYY

Hippy cunt.

I don't want to read about your paedo naked-schoolboy-in-clingfilm 'art installations'.

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11 hours ago, The XYY Man said:

First conceived in 1982, it was 1996 before "Our Friends In The North" hit the screens of BBC2.

Fucking amazing piece of British television...

XYY

You are right there pet.

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13 hours ago, The XYY Man said:

First conceived in 1982, it was 1996 before "Our Friends In The North" hit the screens of BBC2.

Fucking amazing piece of British television...

XYY

It was excellent. One of the finest dramas ever. The actors have done alright since.

I did have some man tears when those chords began and Don't Look Back In Anger was played at the end. (Actually fitting in that context.)

But then again for all my hard exterior I am a soppy sod!

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3 minutes ago, Alonso Quijano said:

It was excellent. One of the finest dramas ever. The actors have done alright since.

I did have some man tears when those chords began and Don't Look Back In Anger was played at the end. (Actually fitting in that context.)

But then again for all my hard exterior I am a soppy sod!

Well don't watch "Kenny" on BBC iPlayer then.

This documentary film of former Liverpool player and manager Kenny Dalglish reduced me to tears several times.

A fascinating and poignant story that any football fan will appreciate. 

Highly recommended...

 

XYY

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14 hours ago, The XYY Man said:

First conceived in 1982, it was 1996 before "Our Friends In The North" hit the screens of BBC2.

Fucking amazing piece of British television...

 

XYY

Interesting that it was conceived just after the Conservatives and Thatcher took power (1979)and was published in 1996 after all the conflict with the miners and when the UK was in the middle of a very nasty recession/depression and just before NuLabour got in.  The idea of say Islington types having friends in the North was almost unheard of before then but there was some empathy in those days apparently because London was so badly hit then. 

Almost as if they knew in advance.  

Just all a coincidence I expect.

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2 minutes ago, twocents said:

Interesting that it was conceived just after the Conservatives and Thatcher took power (1979)and was published in 1996 after all the conflict with the miners and when the UK was in the middle of a very nasty recession/depression and just before NuLabour got in.  The idea of say Islington types having friends in the North was almost unheard of before then but there was some empathy in those days apparently because London was so badly hit then. 

Almost as if they knew in advance.  

Just all a coincidence I expect.

Aye, who knows.? You could be right. 

Gina McKee's tits were certainly not up to much though - unlike those of Benny Barrett's scrubber...

 

XYY

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Ah school film club.

In those days of entertainment shortages where Seaside Special was considered prime time Saturday night vieiwng we could always rely upn school flm club for a free evening's midweek entertainment.

How I looked forward to it; I didn't realise schools had film clubs.

A few weeks into term first up was The Cassandra Crossing with its dodgy line a bout "some sweaty pervert".  Good film, liked it, what's next?

A few weeks later - Hannibal Brooks - an engaging film with Oliver Reed not playing a hard man for once, and with an escaping elephant.  Marvellous fun.

That was it for the term but we were pleased with that; free cinema, decent quality film and sound.  Great.

Next term:  The Cassandra Crossing, then Hannibal Brooks.  The film club only had two films; and that was all they ever had while I was there. 

Hmmmm...

 

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7 minutes ago, Bedrag Justesen said:

Bobby Robson - More Than A Manager

Cheers Beddy - I'll check that one out.

I'd heartily recommend "I Believe In Miracles" if you haven't seen it.

Tells the tale of Brian Clough's Nottingham Forest and their two European Cup wins.

Interviews with the ex-players are funny as fuck - especially Larry Lloyd and Kenny Burns...

 

XYY

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