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One percent

When the cost of washing becomes just too much

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-stoke-staffordshire-44532905

A primary school is considering providing a washing machine for parents who cannot afford to keep their children's clothes clean.

The head teacher of St Paul's Church of England Primary School in Stoke-on-Trent said she has spent own money buying items for pupils.

Nicola Finney said it was due to a rise in children attending school with "washing and hygiene issues".

A study found more than 40% of parents cannot afford basic hygiene products.

Ms Finney said staff at her school were considering installing a washing machine.

The charity which carried out the survey, In Kind Direct, provides her school with essentials such as toothpaste, soap, sanitary products and toilet roll.

 

would anyone like to hazard a guess as to what these feckless parents do spend their money on?  A bar of soap is hardly expensive. Ffs. 

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Not just children. I do find when I am in public young adults are not washing their clothes. Usually jumpers and coats - they may have not been washed for months. They can stick of B.O.

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5 minutes ago, 201p said:

Not just children. I do find when I am in public young adults are not washing their clothes. Usually jumpers and coats - they may have not been washed for months. They can stick of B.O.

Apparently, washing your jeans is bad for them.

https://hiutdenim.co.uk/pages/washing-instructions

https://hiutdenim.co.uk/blogs/story/101833089-the-no-wash-club

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'Hygiene' mainly lies in the eyes of the beholder.

There is no real reason for washing clothes regularly -- I'd imagine many people would have a new shirt daily, whilst others would go for many many days (weeks) on the same shirt.  And this isn't just a 'posh' vs 'common' thing -- decades ago my dad worked in finance, and he had two shirts but ten collars and cuffs that buttoned in -- the idea was that you'd have new collar and cuff each day, but the shirt would be fine for the week.

Bathing is similar.  For some reason the expectation is now to have a daily shower.  A few decades ago and a weekly bath would be fancy.

Anyway, i'd suggest that the kids and their parents are perfectly happy being a teeny bit smelly, and the only one offended is the teacher.  They then invent 'poverty' as the reason, whereas it is actually 'why would you do more than one wash a week, particularly for kids?'

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10 minutes ago, dgul said:

'Hygiene' mainly lies in the eyes of the beholder.

There is no real reason for washing clothes regularly -- I'd imagine many people would have a new shirt daily, whilst others would go for many many days (weeks) on the same shirt.  And this isn't just a 'posh' vs 'common' thing -- decades ago my dad worked in finance, and he had two shirts but ten collars and cuffs that buttoned in -- the idea was that you'd have new collar and cuff each day, but the shirt would be fine for the week.

Bathing is similar.  For some reason the expectation is now to have a daily shower.  A few decades ago and a weekly bath would be fancy.

Anyway, i'd suggest that the kids and their parents are perfectly happy being a teeny bit smelly, and the only one offended is the teacher.  They then invent 'poverty' as the reason, whereas it is actually 'why would you do more than one wash a week, particularly for kids?'

As a young child we used to have the tin bath in front of the fire every Friday night with the water heated in a large "pan" over the fire. It wasn't until I was 5 that the council installed bathrooms in all the houses on our estate.

I was scrubbed face and hands etc. every night and morning (and as required in between o.O)

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12 minutes ago, dgul said:

'Hygiene' mainly lies in the eyes of the beholder.

There is no real reason for washing clothes regularly -- I'd imagine many people would have a new shirt daily, whilst others would go for many many days (weeks) on the same shirt.  And this isn't just a 'posh' vs 'common' thing -- decades ago my dad worked in finance, and he had two shirts but ten collars and cuffs that buttoned in -- the idea was that you'd have new collar and cuff each day, but the shirt would be fine for the week.

Bathing is similar.  For some reason the expectation is now to have a daily shower.  A few decades ago and a weekly bath would be fancy.

Anyway, i'd suggest that the kids and their parents are perfectly happy being a teeny bit smelly, and the only one offended is the teacher.  They then invent 'poverty' as the reason, whereas it is actually 'why would you do more than one wash a week, particularly for kids?'

Yes it's a load of twaddle designed to tug at middle class lefty heartstrings. The article implies that children wearing underwear for 'two days or more' is somehow shocking, but kids don't sweat as much as adults and I recall as a child quite often wearing the same underwear two days running, and the same school shirt usually for five days. Plus, children's outwear gets dirty easily because of playing - especially if they are normal healthy active children, not common-purpose drones sitting in a classroom learning about Eid and recycling all day. 

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An engineer in work missed a week’s wages a couple of months ago, because of sickness. The business part paid him although he was not entitled to sick pay, because he is rarely sick. It took him 2 months to get back on top of the bills having effectively missed 3 days wages plus some overtime. Last year, with overtime he grossed over £43k......

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48 minutes ago, One percent said:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-stoke-staffordshire-44532905

A primary school is considering providing a washing machine for parents who cannot afford to keep their children's clothes clean.

The head teacher of St Paul's Church of England Primary School in Stoke-on-Trent said she has spent own money buying items for pupils.

Nicola Finney said it was due to a rise in children attending school with "washing and hygiene issues".

A study found more than 40% of parents cannot afford basic hygiene products.

Ms Finney said staff at her school were considering installing a washing machine.

The charity which carried out the survey, In Kind Direct, provides her school with essentials such as toothpaste, soap, sanitary products and toilet roll.

 

would anyone like to hazard a guess as to what these feckless parents do spend their money on?  A bar of soap is hardly expensive. Ffs. 

Tampons?

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5 minutes ago, The Generation Game said:

Tampons?

How very dare you. Have you not heard of tampax poverty. How do you think these poor bennie seekers can afford such luxury items? They have sky and Netflix to support. 

Triggered. 

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17 minutes ago, Option5 said:

As a young child we used to have the tin bath in front of the fire every Friday night with the water heated in a large "pan" over the fire. It wasn't until I was 5 that the council installed bathrooms in all the houses on our estate.

I was scrubbed face and hands etc. every night and morning (and as required in between o.O)

I remember it being Sunday night, ready for the school week. There was also getting washed standing in the scullery sink.

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1 hour ago, Bkkandrew said:

Good grief. Again, Cambodia has an average wage of $168/month. Even those on the lowest 10% incomes manage to find soap to wash their clothes and theirselves. 

Why is the UK such a 4th World basketcase?

Cos Fatcha n the evil Tories innit. 

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1 hour ago, Bkkandrew said:

Good grief. Again, Cambodia has an average wage of $168/month. Even those on the lowest 10% incomes manage to find soap to wash their clothes and theirselves. 

Why is the UK such a 4th World basketcase?

Similar story from my wife.. she has relatively poor roots in Mexico.

”Nobody thinks less of you for being poor..   but there is no excuse for not being cleanly”.

I’m sure it’s a mix of poor planning/priorities and bone idleness.. :Old:

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As is so often the case nowadays, there appears to be a charity behind all this, called 'In Kind Direct' which is concerned with 'hygiene poverty'. 

According to their website: ' In Kind Direct receives donated goods from companies and distributes them to UK charities working at home and overseas so they can help millions of people'. 

My guess is these 'donated goods' are written off as a loss for tax, or something similar, and thus the companies (and the charity) have a vested interest in promoting the idea of 'hygiene poverty.' 

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Back in the 70s people washed a lot less and smelled a lot more. If everyone pongs then it’s a lot less noticeable. Whether or not the modern tendency to change clothes and shower daily is good or bad is anyone’s guess.

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1 minute ago, Austin Allegro said:

As is so often the case nowadays, there appears to be a charity behind all this, called 'In Kind Direct' which is concerned with 'hygiene poverty'. 

According to their website: ' In Kind Direct receives donated goods from companies and distributes them to UK charities working at home and overseas so they can help millions of people'. 

My guess is these 'donated goods' are written off as a loss for tax, or something similar, and thus the companies (and the charity) have a vested interest in promoting the idea of 'hygiene poverty.' 

I might forego a wash for a couple of weeks and then rock up at their offices. See if I can score some fairy 

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3 minutes ago, TheBlueCat said:

Back in the 70s people washed a lot less and smelled a lot more. If everyone pongs then it’s a lot less noticeable. Whether or not the modern tendency to change clothes and shower daily is good or bad is anyone’s guess.

Someone should tell that schoolmistress that washing clothes too often results in plastic microfibres (from man made clothing) ending up in the oceans and destroying the seas. 

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6 minutes ago, Austin Allegro said:

As is so often the case nowadays, there appears to be a charity behind all this, called 'In Kind Direct' which is concerned with 'hygiene poverty'. 

According to their website: ' In Kind Direct receives donated goods from companies and distributes them to UK charities working at home and overseas so they can help millions of people'. 

My guess is these 'donated goods' are written off as a loss for tax, or something similar, and thus the companies (and the charity) have a vested interest in promoting the idea of 'hygiene poverty.' 

Flippin 'eck. Income £22.5 million

http://apps.charitycommission.gov.uk/Showcharity/RegisterOfCharities/FinancialHistory.aspx?RegisteredCharityNumber=1052679&SubsidiaryNumber=0

Here is their blurb and accounts

http://apps.charitycommission.gov.uk/Accounts/Ends79/0001052679_AC_20161231_E_C.pdf

I'm sure a large part of their PR is self-sustaining

 

 

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11 minutes ago, Austin Allegro said:

Someone should tell that schoolmistress that washing clothes too often results in plastic microfibres (from man made clothing) ending up in the oceans and destroying the seas. 

Make the little buggers wear animal skins I say.

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2 hours ago, Chewing Grass said:

Here we go, gentle soap for little people.

1675829349_Screenshot-2018-6-19MorrisonsShopToiletriesBeautyBathShowerSoapShowerSoapBars.png.28a43282e83c30a92e3cdcd192c080b9.png

You can't even buy a 40g pack of crisps for that.

You can get 4 bars of plain soap from Sainsbury for 1.20. British made too!

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http://uk.businessinsider.com/vivienne-westwood-only-has-a-bath-once-a-week-2017-10?r=US&IR=T

According to VW the secret to staying young and vibrant is to wash your “bits” daily but only bathe once weekly. Well, if you click on the link it’s debatable that her photo depicts her as young and vibrant!

I’ve also read that she doesn’t wash her clothes much either.

I’m quite similar to her views. I used to bathe or shower everyday and wear all clothing only once but don’t do that now.

While I couldn’t go a week between baths I only have one when it’s really required or I’m going out somewhere special and in between I have a good wash. Also I don’t wear clothing once then wash it unless it’s been very warm and I’ve got very sweaty or something has been spilt on it. It’s just common sense IMO. 

The link in the original post is just terrible to read though. It costs pennies to keep clean and if you don’t have a washing machine in larger towns surely their are laundrette facilities still? There was one in this rural town many years ago but it closed due to lack of use!

People in general around my area seem to be managing to keep decently clean and wash clothing.

Maybe we need a return to the provision of a local laundrette everywhere to enable people to do their washing?

 

 

 

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