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DTMark

Disco pop tune - how many instruments?

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As title - I seem to particularly like music that is "busy" especially if euphoric too. I came across this one from 1979 only recently. I then went off exploring all their other stuff, they were quite forward-thinking. Or stole lots of stuff from other people. Either way, love this one.

What really grabs me is just how much is going on in this track. Just how many layers it has. There's a huge stack of stuff working together so beautifully. In particular the section after the break with the mad prog-rock style electric guitar when it comes back @ 02:36.

How many different things do you hear? (The long version splits them apart more at this point: the single overlays everything simultaneously). 

I am so useless with the names of instruments that it really would be pointless for me to attempt to describe. "The high pitched thing making the clicking sound over to the right".

Actually, in the topic title I used the word "instruments". Which of the things on this do you think is a real instrument? I'll guess: possibly some of the percussion and the guitar. Everything else is synth-generated.

It's not a quiz, I don't have the answers. Interested to hear what you think.

 

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Ha! Should have thought to look for a live performance - good call! Mind you it's mimed, not live. Unless they are literally perfect live.

I wondered if there were two guitars.

OK, so a pair of guitars, real drums and a synth. Wasn't too far out with that. It's definitely not a real piano.

I can count eight "things" at the peak of that, but I think some of them are drowned out by the abysmal SQ on YouTube. This track isn't on Tidal. Not in the original mix, anyway. The top hit is PWL's sanitised pop version from 1987 which I think was done with the original artist, but robs the track of all its genius.

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7 minutes ago, DTMark said:

I can count eight "things" at the peak of that, but I think some of them are drowned out by the abysmal SQ on YouTube. This track isn't on Tidal. Not in the original mix, anyway. The top hit is PWL's sanitised pop version from 1987 which I think was done with the original artist, but robs the track of all its genius.

Better?

 

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3 minutes ago, XswampyX said:

Better?

 

The SQ seems better on my computer. Which usually means it'll sound worse on the main system. It sounds like it's had a lot of digital treatment for both better and worse. Or maybe it's an early CD copy.

I just thought to have a look. The original 12" is available for a couple of quid.

https://www.discogs.com/sell/release/956489?ev=rb

Ordered and on the way.

It's like most of my record collection. Nobody else seems to want it, so it's cheap.

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I see what they've done there. The 12" or long version was mastered first and the single was cut from that with a horrendous analogue based cut into that final section.

The 12" builds, adds things, then drops away.

In the single version everything comes at you at once in that final chorus to reduce the run time.

I still hear 8 "things" on the single - I think - but the 12" version has some things which I think might be literally drowned out on the 7" cut.

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Hand claps on the RH channel
Syn drums - (occasional wibbly pew sound)
Drums
Bass Guitar
Synth strings
Synth piano
Synth bass
Rhythm guitar (chopped staccato)
Lead guitar comes in at 2:08
Vocals 

That's all I can determine via youtube and cheap computer speakers. There might be some other stuff in there that would be obvious on the main system but I don't have a copy

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, NTB said:

Hand claps on the RH channel
Syn drums - (occasional wibbly pew sound)
Drums
Bass Guitar
Synth strings
Synth piano
Synth bass
Rhythm guitar (chopped staccato)
Lead guitar comes in at 2:08
Vocals 

That's all I can determine via youtube and cheap computer speakers. There might be some other stuff in there that would be obvious on the main system but I don't have a copy

I'm so tempted to order one for you and have it delivered :) :) But I reckon I could probably gift you something you'd enjoy more than some disco.

Thanks for listening through that. Agreed on the "layers". I hope this one was more tolerable than many, eh ;)

FWIW the guitar is what makes the track. It's the inclusion of that on a disco record that makes it quite special to me and delivers at least a degree of emotion which wouldn't have been present otherwise. To be clear it's not an emotional track in any conventional sense. It's a piece of disco pop. And it's not the world's greatest guitar playing, perhaps - it really reminds me of a guitar sequence from another track (I have a feeling it's either something by Bon Jovi or possibly the SAW version of The Timewarp) but it really powers the track along and the slight oddity of a mad electric guitar alongside a disco backing is quite special. Reminds me of what Jacno were doing in France at around the same time.

I'll bet that you'll already have made the connection between that complex arrangement of euphoric sounds and a particular sequence in another later all-electronica track I rather like (putting it mildly) when both build up to that final chorus with lots of forceful and delicate little sounds all playing off against one another so wonderfully!

Edited by DTMark

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2 hours ago, XswampyX said:

Playing this now. Good god, it's like my old Commodore 64 with more channels. Come back Rob Hubbard.

But - that might come in handy if I ever put some time into trying to create my own music. Meant to do it last year but didn't "get round to it". Thanks!

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Posted (edited)
8 minutes ago, DTMark said:

Playing this now. Good god, it's like my old Commodore 64 with more channels. Come back Rob Hubbard.

Now you're talking!

 

Gah that's the megadrive... xD

 

Edited by XswampyX

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Posted (edited)

This arrived today. From 1979 and in mint condition. It's.. green.

nsb.jpg

Haven't had the turntable going in a while but I put this on.

Incredible. Really quite something.

The drums - instead of being a sort of blurred unmelodic low-frequency noise like on YouTube - sound like drums. You can actually hear them being struck with an extra hard thwack as it goes into the chorus. You hear the musician playing. Likewise with the guitar. You can hear every tiny little bit of 'plucking' and the 'edges' of everything.

A 39 year old record played on a 51 year old turntable. Might not be the best mastered thing in the world (some of it actually sounds digitally mastered though I'm not sure it would have been back in 1979, it's probably more to do with being synth-based), but the extent to which it pisses all over modern mastering and SQ is something to behold.

Cheers all. I'll now drive my partner mad with it for several weeks.

Edited by DTMark

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On ‎21‎/‎06‎/‎2018 at 22:54, DTMark said:

I came across this one from 1979 only recently. I then went off exploring all their other stuff, they were quite forward-thinking. Or stole lots of stuff from other people. Either way, love this one.

A Walk In The Park was generally deemed a sideways upside down version of......

 

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Posted (edited)

Cheers for those - having a listen now.

ELO occupy the identical space to Hall & Oates in my musical sphere. I don't dislike either. I quite like a small amount. Occasionally. "Use sparingly".

I can see/hear why people like them (unlike, say, The Doors, where I cannot comprehend why anybody likes them).

That said I'm not seeing the synergy between that and the "Walk in the Park" track.

The 1970s is a bit of an enigma to me: I can certainly see how disco morphed into the dance music I was listening to in the 1980s and 1990s. It's fascinating to "go backwards" - "that sounds like..." actually, no, it's the other way around.

"Leaving on a Midnight Train" sounds like Bananarama (actually the opposite) since Stock, Aitken and Waterman were good at thievery and picking out bits of things to copy. The drum-work on that is very similar to one or more of their songs.

They obviously liked "Walk in the Park" since they (PWL) covered murdered it in 1987. Their version was a competent but bland Hi-NRG pop track. And that's about all.

Seems like I need to investigate Mansfield's other work.

It is a little early to say with certainty but I suspect "Walk in the Park" may become my second-favourite track of all time. It's more cheesy than some of their other stuff, but that electric guitar and the soundscape of the whole thing - disco meets electronica with a touch of something vaguely resembling a prog-rock guitar adding that steely edge to it works for me :)

 

 

 

 

Edited by DTMark

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On 03/07/2018 at 00:29, DTMark said:

Cheers for those - having a listen now.

ELO occupy the identical space to Hall & Oates in my musical sphere. I don't dislike either. I quite like a small amount. Occasionally. "Use sparingly".

I can see/hear why people like them (unlike, say, The Doors, where I cannot comprehend why anybody likes them).

That said I'm not seeing the synergy between that and the "Walk in the Park" track.

The 1970s is a bit of an enigma to me: I can certainly see how disco morphed into the dance music I was listening to in the 1980s and 1990s. It's fascinating to "go backwards" - "that sounds like..." actually, no, it's the other way around.

"Leaving on a Midnight Train" sounds like Bananarama (actually the opposite) since Stock, Aitken and Waterman were good at thievery and picking out bits of things to copy. The drum-work on that is very similar to one or more of their songs.

They obviously liked "Walk in the Park" since they (PWL) covered murdered it in 1987. Their version was a competent but bland Hi-NRG pop track. And that's about all.

Seems like I need to investigate Mansfield's other work.

It is a little early to say with certainty but I suspect "Walk in the Park" may become my second-favourite track of all time. It's more cheesy than some of their other stuff, but that electric guitar and the soundscape of the whole thing - disco meets electronica with a touch of something vaguely resembling a prog-rock guitar adding that steely edge to it works for me :)

Mind you've "name-dropped" so many well-known folk there Mark that it took me a while to realise it was actually posted by you.

For a while I thought it was posted by @Cunning Plan...!!!

;)

 

XYY

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On 30/06/2018 at 19:42, Bedrag Justesen said:

A Walk In The Park was generally deemed a sideways upside down version of......

 

Well these people could actually play their instruments. Unfortunately the electric piano of that era reminds me of the backing music to porn films on VHS.

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