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One percent

Baked potato: the very definition of poverty

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-44578499

A private girls' school in west London has been criticised for holding an "Austerity Day" where pupils ate potatoes and fruit for lunch.

St Paul's Girls' School, which has fees of £7,978 per term, said serving pupils "simple" food helps them learn about "less fortunate" people.

Henna Shah, who attended the school on a bursary, said the event made her "uncomfortable".

Campaigners said it showed a "complete lack of understanding" of poverty.

The school, where a typical menu for students includes herb-crusted salmon and duck leg confit, posted about the event on Twitter on Wednesday.

Ms Shah took a screenshot of the post before it was deleted.

It said said: "Today was the final Austerity Day of the year. Students and staff had baked potatoes with beans and coleslaw for lunch, with fruit for dessert. The money saved will be donated to the school's charities."

 

a tad tad out of touch I would say. 

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5 minutes ago, One percent said:

It was food of the working classes years ago....

short piece here about the abundance of salmon

As a kid in Dundalk oysters were the food of the poor as the fishermen gave them away because there was no market for them. Bars would serve them in a stew to be eaten with a pint(s) of Guinness.

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1 minute ago, Option5 said:

As a kid in Dundalk oysters were the food of the poor as the fishermen gave them away because there was no market for them. Bars would serve them in a stew to be eaten with a pint(s) of Guinness.

Fucking middle classes appropriating working class food. Who do I complain to?  

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Posted (edited)

Sounds far too healthy, value burgers & chips, mars bar for dessert all washed down with iron bru would of been my menu, 

Edited by snagger

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8 minutes ago, spunko2010 said:

Funnily enough it's now farmed, tastes horrid,  yet is expensive. Definitely going backwards. 

I won’t touch farmed salmon.  The texture is horrid. It’s full of chemicals too to keep the infections at bay. :Sick1:

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1 minute ago, One percent said:

I won’t touch farmed salmon.  The texture is horrid. It’s full of chemicals too to keep the infections at bay. :Sick1:

Me neither. I just buy Alaskan salmon once a month,  expensive but a treat!

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1 minute ago, spunko2010 said:

Me neither. I just buy Alaskan salmon once a month,  expensive but a treat!

Where do you get it?  Even M&S seem to only have farmed salmon these days. 

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1 minute ago, One percent said:

Where do you get it?  Even M&S seem to only have farmed salmon these days. 

Waitrose but has to be the larger stores. It's on offer right now...

https://www.waitrose.com/ecom/products/waitrose-2-boneless-wild-alaskan-keta-salmon-fillets/370623-237474-237475

Just noticed the reviews on that page,  maybe I've been lucky. I don't pan fry it though, just wrap it in foil and shove in oven. 

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2 minutes ago, spunko2010 said:

Tried that once and thought it was awful much worse than farmed and actually less omega 3 I seem to think when I looked at the nutritional information.

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Posted (edited)

I'm considering eating salmon once or twice a week again; I used to go down to the market and buy half a salmon and the cut it up and freeze it. I assumed it was wild salmon, but will check next time I do go down.

Edited by JoeDavola

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12 minutes ago, One percent said:

I won’t touch farmed salmon.  The texture is horrid. It’s full of chemicals too to keep the infections at bay. :Sick1:

I still think health benefits massively outweigh this. I often think the farmed or full of mercury argument is just one people use as an excuse not to eat fish.

Farmed doesn't necessarily mean bad farmed mussels are cheap and perfectly ok I find.

2 minutes ago, Admiral Pepe said:

It's smoked but the best salmon I've had by a mile

https://www.burrensmokehouse.com/

 

Oddly the best mainstream availability one I've found is Asda of all places.

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3 minutes ago, SNACR said:

I still think health benefits massively outweigh this. I often think the farmed or full of mercury argument is just one people use as an excuse not to eat fish.

Farmed doesn't necessarily mean bad farmed mussels are cheap and perfectly ok I find.

Oddly the best mainstream availability one I've found is Asda of all places.

Perhaps but I just don’t like the texture. Nasty. 

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Posted (edited)
30 minutes ago, snagger said:

Sounds far too healthy, value burgers & chips, mars bar for dessert all washed down with iron bru would of been my menu, 

I thought I was eating healthier with a baked potatoe but recently saw a program about carbs... a plain one had the equivalent of 19 cubes of sugar.. ?

Edited by Democorruptcy

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Farmed salmon is pretty dire. Once you know the differences there isn't any going back. It's easy to spot too, especially when raw. Tend to find the best fish to eat when having sushi in the UK is mackeral.

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1 hour ago, One percent said:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-44578499

A private girls' school in west London has been criticised for holding an "Austerity Day" where pupils ate potatoes and fruit for lunch.

St Paul's Girls' School, which has fees of £7,978 per term, said serving pupils "simple" food helps them learn about "less fortunate" people.

Henna Shah, who attended the school on a bursary, said the event made her "uncomfortable".

Campaigners said it showed a "complete lack of understanding" of poverty.

The school, where a typical menu for students includes herb-crusted salmon and duck leg confit, posted about the event on Twitter on Wednesday.

Ms Shah took a screenshot of the post before it was deleted.

It said said: "Today was the final Austerity Day of the year. Students and staff had baked potatoes with beans and coleslaw for lunch, with fruit for dessert. The money saved will be donated to the school's charities."

 

a tad tad out of touch I would say. 

Yep.

Kebab, everything on.

Then some Ben n Jerrys.

It really goes to show how far the middle classes are from grasping how much miney people take in tax credits.

5 minutes ago, Democorruptcy said:

I thought I was eating healthier with a baked potatoe but recently saw a program about carbs... a plain one had the equivalent of 19 cubes of sugar.. ?

Not equiv.

Most of the carbs remain bound to the fibre.

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6 minutes ago, Democorruptcy said:

I thought I was eating healthier with a baked potatoe but recently saw a program about carbs... a plain one had the equivalent of 19 cubes of sugar.. ?

Baking or mashing does things to a potato.

2 minutes ago, spygirl said:

 

Most of the carbs remain bound to the fibre.

 

2018-06-22_18_21_07.jpg

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3 minutes ago, Cunning Plan said:

Well yes. It makes it edible.

But you are a carrot and therefore probably biased.

I'm not a carrot I'm just an orange parsnip?

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