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spygirl

Why id never do a mon fri 9-6 in London

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Posted (edited)
47 minutes ago, spygirl said:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5886005/Meltdown-Britain-UK-set-FIVE-heatwaves-summer-country.html

Commute in, spending 6k to travel cattle class, leave at 6am, get home at 9pm.

All so a bu ch of shitholers can live in kensington for free.

 

14 minutes ago, 201p said:

Tempers are usually short in the heat and queues.

 

12 minutes ago, One percent said:

Nobody queues anymore in londonistan. Our new guests appear to not understand the concept 

 

Can you imagine the commute on the tube these past few weeks, itd be pure hell!

 

Edited by Green Devil

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oh! I live there.

House prices + rents are out of order.

I've never had a problem queuing.

And if you show kindness you'll be surprised by the reaction (in a good way).

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I'm in London, and it's fine for me, but I live a 40 minute walk / 20 minutes bus ride from where I work, and I have an ancient tenancy grandfathered from my parents that is regulated under the fair rent.

I'm still considering fucking off out of the country in a couple of years though, I see hard times ahead (worst case brexit or steptoe), and I've got to put myself first. Thankfully as an experienced infosec professional, the world is pretty much my oyster! Asia is looking good to me.

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Posted (edited)

When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life....

 

I would tire of it pretty quickly nowadays though I would imagine. I've only ever visited it a handful of times, and have no wish to ever go there again, it would be nice if it was still inhabitable, or even visitable though. Various things have put pay to that for the time being though.

Edited by Carl Fimble
defucking the quote

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There's an article in the FT that confirms this:

https://www.ft.com/content/d1ba832e-794a-11e8-8e67-1e1a0846c475

Jist - Londons productivity is falling becasue of the long hours worked.

The article then goes on and confirms other issues Ive raised on here and ToS - mainly about tax credits, finance services being reamed, all tax credit make work.

'“London’s economic growth is purely down to its population explosion, with hospitality replacing banking as the big growth sector in the capital,” said Stephen Clarke, senior economic analyst at the Resolution Foundation.'

'“Sectors that have traditionally powered London’s productivity growth, from finance to IT, are if anything going backwards,” said Mr Clarke.'

You  might wantto think carefully on what those 2 sentences mean - the London economy is basically made up by loads of  foreign people doing low paid, tax credit subbed work.

I meann for fuck sake, bringing in low paid people into the most expensive cities of thw world and 8paying* to do shit, low paid paids. Then paying housing benefit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, spygirl said:

There's an article in the FT that confirms this:

https://www.ft.com/content/d1ba832e-794a-11e8-8e67-1e1a0846c475

Jist - Londons productivity is falling becasue of the long hours worked.

The article then goes on and confirms other issues Ive raised on here and ToS - mainly about tax credits, finance services being reamed, all tax credit make work.

'“London’s economic growth is purely down to its population explosion, with hospitality replacing banking as the big growth sector in the capital,” said Stephen Clarke, senior economic analyst at the Resolution Foundation.'

'“Sectors that have traditionally powered London’s productivity growth, from finance to IT, are if anything going backwards,” said Mr Clarke.'

You  might wantto think carefully on what those 2 sentences mean - the London economy is basically made up by loads of  foreign people doing low paid, tax credit subbed work.

I meann for fuck sake, bringing in low paid people into the most expensive cities of thw world and 8paying* to do shit, low paid paids. Then paying housing benefit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Also I think that those in well paid jobs have woken up to the fact that there are a lot of people in London sitting around on bennies while they slog into work on overcrowded public transport. Then, for many, they are stuck in expensive rented accommodation. 

Pin short they are being shafted and they know it. Most I think do as little as possible. 

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9 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

It was a tremendous experience in my twenties; though as many people do by thirty I had had enough.

I wouldn't consider working there now but my twenties are some years back.

That was the story with all of my mates from Uni. They headed to London en-masse after they had graduated, I was the only one that didn't and, after visiting them many times, was glad that I didn't. It really wasn't my thing and I was done with flatsharing after uni, it seemed a necessity in London.

Anyway, by their 30's pretty much all of them had gone. Kids were a big factor but quite a few had burnt themselves out and had decided enough was enough.

 

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Bollocks was it just the heat, the trains were already struggling at 8am. This is why we pay extortionate rent so my husband can walk in. I vetoed a move to a team based in the central London office last year - London transport is horrible enough when it works and hell on earth when it breaks (which is at least once a fortnight).

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10 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

If I was there now then the people who were in Grenfell Tower would have very much brought this home to me.  I started renting a room in the suburbs because it was all that I could afford.  I assumed that anybody who had a flat in a block in Kensington was extremely successful and wealthy through a lifetime of hard work.

Had I realised that I was working hard and commuting for three hours a day whilst renting a room and that my taxes were paying for some unemployed and unemployable immigrant to have a flat in Kensington then I would have been very pissed off.

I think too that Grenfell was the red pill moment for many. It’s why I can’t understand the establishment keeping it in the news. Just shows how out of touch they are. 

The only thing that is keeping London afloat is the indigenous population (stop laughing in the cheap seats).  By this I mean, those born in London. They might be secod, third generation , but only those born in London can afford to live in the city. They are all still at home with mum and dad. 

This is purely anecdotal but I don’t see many people who have left uni and moved to London to kickstart their career. It’s all locals (or migrants) nothing in between 

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28 minutes ago, One percent said:

I think too that Grenfell was the red pill moment for many. It’s why I can’t understand the establishment keeping it in the news. Just shows how out of touch they are. 

The only thing that is keeping London afloat is the indigenous population (stop laughing in the cheap seats).  By this I mean, those born in London. They might be secod, third generation , but only those born in London can afford to live in the city. They are all still at home with mum and dad. 

This is purely anecdotal but I don’t see many people who have left uni and moved to London to kickstart their career. It’s all locals (or migrants) nothing in between 

London rents have made it uneconomic for anyone starting off with no money, as most students do, to take a job there.

The modern phenomenon of there being loads of posh actors has the same root; without family money you can't live there with little income waiting for the next audition.

I noted without surprise that the wedding reception for Rose Leslie and Jon Snow was held at her father's castle.

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2 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

London rents have made it uneconomic for anyone starting off with no money, as most students do, to take a job there.

The modern phenomenon of there being loads of posh actors has the same root; without family money you can't live there with little income waiting for the next audition.

I noted without surprise that the wedding reception for Rose Leslie and Jon Snow was held at her father's castle.

I wonder how much longer London can function for. An example is universities. They don’t pay great salaries and so don’t know how they will continue to attract high talent. I notice that they are already beginning to slip in the international league tables 

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I lived in Essex and I never wanted to work in London, but I wanted a retail head office logistics and merchandising role and that's hard to find elsewhere. Two major retailers were in the Marylebone area and that's where I ended up working.

The fastest commute was to drive to Walthamstow and pick up the Victoria Line. It was sometimes possible to do in just over an hour. However you can only get stuck in that queue at the bottom of the M11 and brave driving through Walthamstow for so long. I eventually paid more (far more) and just got the mainline train. About 90 minutes each way.

I knew it would be horrible but when you do it every day you "switch off" from the commute. And anyway we get used to patterns and habits.

Not once did it occur to me to live nearer.

After a few years I got a chance to work from home in a similar role but with higher pay and not having to go through all that every day was so lovely. Plus the saving of the cost of the season ticket which IIRC had got to well over 2 grand by that point. And not having to pay for car parking. And coffees from the AMT Espresso stand. The cost of the overheads becomes staggering.

Now add in the fact that you need only get a few people with an infection who ought to have stayed home in a carriage for that to spread in that confined environment. I got so many colds.

And having to drive in to work and park near Regents Park when there's a tube strike. Or walk from Marylebone to Liverpool Street.

I think, as Frank says, you can do it when you're younger. I couldn't do it now.

I believe this was all summed up in the sentiments of a Stevie Wonder song.

 

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17 minutes ago, One percent said:

I wonder how much longer London can function for. An example is universities. They don’t pay great salaries and so don’t know how they will continue to attract high talent. I notice that they are already beginning to slip in the international league tables 

The house prices and rents have choked off that supply of young ambitious graduates who are now instead going to go elsewhere for their careers; academic or otherwise.

The likely result of this will be, as you say, that the quality of staff in London drops to whatever you can get (somebody noted NHS administrators in London are paid about £18k, any guesses upon the quality of their work?) and the standards of companies, public sector, and uni all slip downwards towards awful.

So you end up in a million pound house but feeling like you're living in the third world in terms of the private and public services around you.

Ultimately that has to correct because nobody will be coming to London except to claim benefits and it will sink further.

Maybe that's applicable to much of the south east.  It was relatively rare in my day for people to stay in their university town after qualifying but the lack of draw from London has seen a lot of people do this since about 2000 so the "talent" is now working in university towns which don't have daft house prices.

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1 minute ago, Frank Hovis said:

The house prices and rents have choked off that supply of young ambitious graduates who are now instead going to go elsewhere for their careers; academic or otherwise.

The likely result of this will be, as you say, that the quality of staff in London drops to whatever you can get (somebody noted NHS administrators in London are paid about £18k, any guesses upon the quality of their work?) and the standards of companies, public sector, and uni all slip downwards towards awful.

So you end up in a million pound house but feeling like you're living in the third world in terms of the private and public services around you.

Ultimately that has to correct because nobody will be coming to London except to claim benefits and it will sink further.

Maybe that's applicable to much of the south east.  It was relatively rare in my day for people to stay in their university town after qualifying but the lack of draw from London has seen a lot of people do this since about 2000 so the "talent" is now working in university towns which don't have daft house prices.

I think that is very true. One of my reasons for moving out of Surrey is so that my sons don't return here after uni. It is a life sentence of shit.

Eldest has been holidaying in Kingsbridge this week. The only pictures he has sent back have been estate agents windows with 'wow, look what £300k will buy you' comments.

I think the penny has dropped with him.

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I think since the millennium a large chunk of the Dick Whittingtons, that arrive each year, have been girls, from the provinces, with fathers wealthy enough to subsidise their cost of living. 

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5 minutes ago, SNACR said:

I think since the millennium a large chunk of the Dick Whittingtons, that arrive each year, have been girls, from the provinces, with fathers wealthy enough to subsidise their cost of living. 

Dicked Whittingtons?

 

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11 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

It was a tremendous experience in my twenties; though as many people do by thirty I had had enough.

I wouldn't consider working there now but my twenties are some years back.

But Id guess you were relatively well paid and well housed and not overly over taxed and livign close to work

Different tlae now now, having to commute 2h in from Luton, pay tax to Somalis to live in Kensington.

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5 minutes ago, spygirl said:

But Id guess you were relatively well paid and well housed and not overly over taxed and livign close to work

Different tlae now now, having to commute 2h in from Luton, pay tax to Somalis to live in Kensington.

I lived with my parents rent-free. IIRC by age 24 I was earning over 30k. That was a lot of money back then.

Although again IIRC I started on something like £14k.

Given that people don't generally go straight into £30k+ jobs and looking at the cost of living, I'd have thought that, these days, working in London = living with your parents.

It only really works if it's one of those careers that you can only do in London and as a result your salary ramps up very quickly. If it's something you can do elsewhere then it seems hard to justify working in London.

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4 minutes ago, DTMark said:

I lived with my parents rent-free. IIRC by age 24 I was earning over 30k. That was a lot of money back then.

Although again IIRC I started on something like £14k.

Given that people don't generally go straight into £30k+ jobs and looking at the cost of living, I'd have thought that, these days, working in London = living with your parents.

It only really works if it's one of those careers that you can only do in London and as a result your salary ramps up very quickly. If it's something you can do elsewhere then it seems hard to justify working in London.

A nd theres a the big shft.

London is not attracting talented people.

Its only able to employ people able to live with their parents nearby.

Ive been thru this with a client.

Ive pointed out to him that the only way the business can survive - and Im serious - is if hous e prices halve or wages more than double.

Ive told him that his business is no longer viable as the sector has shifted o so much software that he needs to employ 5 software heads. He has one, who's retiring soon.

'We get them in for interview but turn the job down as its not enough to live'

The local area is just OAP and the benefit classes.

 

 

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