• Welcome to DOSBODS

    Please consider creating a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

Frank Hovis

Goodbye landlines

Recommended Posts

It's funny how quickly some things change.  Even ten years' ago somebody who had a mobile number but no landline was viewed as a bit suspect.  Now I haven't got one except to carry broadband at home, no phone connected, and at work I only give out my works' mobile with my £300 desk phone unconnected and gathering dust behind my computer.

I pushed the case for having mobiles only at my last company, though not at this one as it's not my budget, and I think it's inevitable.

What you could probably do with as a work accessory is a mobile phone cradle into which you put your mobile and it has a separate handset like a normla deks phone; rather like a docking station for laptops.  They probably already exist.

 

 

Quote

 

Accountancy giant PwC is doing away with landlines at office desks, with all staff expected to only use mobiles by the end of the summer.

The company, which has 24 offices in the UK employing about 18,000 staff, said the switch to mobiles would be "more efficient".

A few landlines will remain for security to use, and in rooms used for client meetings and at reception.

Meeting rooms will use new conferencing technology that can connect to mobiles.

"We already equip all of our people with a mobile phone, and many had already moved away from using their landlines," a spokesman for PwC said.

"With landline usage falling rapidly, we believe that a more mobile-focused policy is a more efficient way of working."


 

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-44654802

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good luck with that.

Ive been in plenty of buildings where you canot get a mobile signal.

A large number of large offices are built like faraday cages.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, spygirl said:

Good luck with that.

Ive been in plenty of buildings where you canot get a mobile signal.

A large number of large offices are built like faraday cages.

 

Never had a problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, spygirl said:

Good luck with that.

Ive been in plenty of buildings where you canot get a mobile signal.

A large number of large offices are built like faraday cages.

 

that's our problem, have an O2 booster box system, and a Vodafone solution inside the building, signal still sucks in some areas.

but at home, I'd consider a cradle like device.  We unplugged the landline a while a go, and often don't hear the mobile when it's left charging in another room.

Edited by snagger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

IIRC Princess Diana launched a huge campaign against landlines. Blame her.

and I think Harry will get the new Princess of Hearts to continue the crusade

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

IIRC Princess Diana launched a huge campaign against landlines. Blame her.

i was thinking this when i read the thread title, yet again id misread it (deliberately some might say).

Edited by leonardratso

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use IP phones for work purposes.  A single number goes to a landline (ip phone with ethernet socket), mobile (via mobile magic) and computer (via software).  This is actually more useful than 'just mobile' -- I can have people the 'general phone line' just by logging in when it is their turn, rather than handing around 'the general phone line' mobile phone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, dgul said:

I use IP phones for work purposes.  A single number goes to a landline (ip phone with ethernet socket), mobile (via mobile magic) and computer (via software).  This is actually more useful than 'just mobile' -- I can have people the 'general phone line' just by logging in when it is their turn, rather than handing around 'the general phone line' mobile phone.

No, you've lost me there.  Have a rep as it sounds cool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, dgul said:

I use IP phones for work purposes.  A single number goes to a landline (ip phone with ethernet socket), mobile (via mobile magic) and computer (via software).  This is actually more useful than 'just mobile' -- I can have people the 'general phone line' just by logging in when it is their turn, rather than handing around 'the general phone line' mobile phone.

We utilise IP phones as well. App on mobiles, computer software, desk phone for people that want it plugged into an ethernet port. Can access anywhere in the world, transfer/pull/park calls to other devices. Cheap as chips too compared to ISDN.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The phone lines around here are crap, I've been fighting with them for the last 18 years. I remember being told that even when the local exchange had broadband we wouldn't be able to use it due to the age and condition of the lines.

It works, just, but with constant packet loss and line dropping, reporting it to BT just results in a £130 charge to fight. I'm on the edge of moving to 4G, an external antenna will get a signal here and a desk phone with a dock replacement would be ideal. Copper lines are dead anyway as exchanges will be moving to voip over fibre shortly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, snagger said:

that's our problem, have an O2 booster box system, and a Vodafone solution inside the building, signal still sucks in some areas.

but at home, I'd consider a cradle like device.  We unplugged the landline a while a go, and often don't hear the mobile when it's left charging in another room.

After much excitement b ythe mobile companies on improving their network by using customers leccy + broadband, they swiftly went off boosters/nanocells as they are a security issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, dgul said:

I use IP phones for work purposes.  A single number goes to a landline (ip phone with ethernet socket), mobile (via mobile magic) and computer (via software).  This is actually more useful than 'just mobile' -- I can have people the 'general phone line' just by logging in when it is their turn, rather than handing around 'the general phone line' mobile phone.

thought this was fairly standard in work now, I know we have it, have had for a couple of years now at least.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Libspero said:

Are international calls really that cheap from mobile now,  or are people using some kind of voip?

I think most must be using VOIP now. You know when someone is using because of the latency

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are a big enough company that we used to have a complete internal phone system connecting our offices but they have now done away with that and blokes came round to take all the extension handsets off our desks. 

Now we have to use Skype aka Lync which can be problem sometimes but generally I prefer it. The useful thing for me is the Skype app works on any mobile not just official issue ones. As a kid watching star trek I never thought it would one day be totally normal to be on a conference call at work using a Lt. Uhura style earpiece. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Kilham said:

The phone lines around here are crap, I've been fighting with them for the last 18 years. I remember being told that even when the local exchange had broadband we wouldn't be able to use it due to the age and condition of the lines.

It works, just, but with constant packet loss and line dropping, reporting it to BT just results in a £130 charge to fight. I'm on the edge of moving to 4G, an external antenna will get a signal here and a desk phone with a dock replacement would be ideal. Copper lines are dead anyway as exchanges will be moving to voip over fibre shortly.

you should go round and shoot up the local exchange, you know blast some of those ISDN machines and packet switches, ram the street boxes with your car on the way there.

BT wont do anything though, they dont care about your problems, theyve got shareholders and executives to pay and pension holes to ignore.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a VOIP system installed into our new office which uses a GSM gateway which has 16 mobile sims installed - the system recognises when we dial an 07 number and routes the calls through the GSM aka using up free minutes on the SIMS

Plus the sims are BT ONE and hugely configurable.

 

I have no idea what it all means really & just wanted to show off

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Admiral Pepe said:

I think most must be using VOIP now. You know when someone is using because of the latency

I was an earlyish adopter of voip at home about ten years ago because family yakked on phone none stop and I couldn't manage the BT bills. Using Sipgate instead I cut my monthly bill by 90% at one go and it had the advantage of looking and feeling exactly like a real landline. 

Only problem was that home bandwidth wasn't so good back then. My gasbag ex-wife used to get all upset when into the second hour of her natter with some friend the call would go all crackly because the kids had started some torrents. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Admiral Pepe said:

I think most must be using VOIP now. You know when someone is using because of the latency

Not really noticeable.

I love my VOIP system. I used to have a big box, 10 lines 20 extensions and an absolute pain in the ass to change anything. And it cost a bloody fortune.

Now I have 10 incoming lines, each displaying the particular business the customer called, have music on hold, answerphone forwarded to email, ability to switch the whole thing to any mobile, and can change everything with a couple of taps on the web. There is very little it can't do for £5 / line / month.

My favourite feature is that if I go away, I can take the phone with me and wherever I plug it in, it works. So I can sit in my Mother's place in Florida and as far as the world is concerned, I am still in the UK. My assistant and I can talk to each other as easily as dialling the next office extension number.

VOIP really did change the way offices work, and probably put an awful lot of telephone providers out of business.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, spygirl said:

After much excitement b ythe mobile companies on improving their network by using customers leccy + broadband, they swiftly went off boosters/nanocells as they are a security issue.

Our work booster box system is a little more developed than your average home booster system. We did have a very good 2G signal in the building as Vodafone installed a picocell inside the building. VF turned it off one day without telling us, apparently they were switching off their entire remaining 2G network :( 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

No landlines to speak of here in Cambodia.

Everyone just uses 4G+ and large office’s FTTH/FTTO for large data.

BTS sites use FTTBTS/FTTPICO to lay off the 4G+ traffic.

Its simple when you don’t have legacy infrastructure to get in the way.

Edited by Bkkandrew
Typo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.