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spygirl

Which NHS treatment would you stop?

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-44665560

This was last years:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-40683915

Cuts to NHS homeopathy. I mean, for fuck sake, that is a toal farce. How any health organisation can justify running 2 homeopathy hospital is beyond a fucking joke.

'These include surgery for snoring, where there is said to be only limited clinical evidence of effectiveness and which poses significant risks to patients.

The others are: dilatation and curettage for heavy menstrual bleeding, knee arthroscopies for osteoarthritis and injections for non-specific back pain.

A further 13 procedures will only to be offered when specific criteria are met:

  • Breast reduction
  • Removal of benign skin lesions
  • Grommets for Glue Ear
  • Tonsillectomy for sore throats
  • Haemorrhoid surgery
  • Hysterectomy for heavy menstrual bleeding
  • Chalazia (lesions on eyelids) removal
  • Anthroscopic compression for subacromial shoulder pain
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome release
  • Dupuytren's contracture release for tightening of fingers
  • Ganglion excision - removal of noncancerous lumps on the wrist or hand
  • Trigger finger release
  • Varicose vein surgery'

Id ban most surgery for the over 80s.

Not even being a cunt to OAP. The chances of an 80yo recoring from some of the srugical procedures are nuts.

Being laid up for a 2 weeks finishes most of them off.

Ona arelated note:

http://tv.bt.com/tv/tv-news/what-is-the-big-nhs-singalong-live-and-when-is-it-on-itv-1136428044833 5

Its a cult, isnt it?

 

 

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Posted (edited)

That list sounds a lot better than the media spin about it being all about tonsils.  Facts eh, gotta love 'em.  What about reassignment surgery and gastric bands?  And you wanna look better?  Look after yourself and start saving.  But only save £200m on a multi billion budget?  But that'll include salary costs, failed IT, management consultants, and the like too.

Edited by No Duff

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1 minute ago, No Duff said:

That list sounds a lot better than the media spin about it being all about tonsils.  Facts eh, gotta love 'em.  What about reassignment surgery and gastric bands?  But only save £200m on a multi billion budget?  But that'll include salary costs, failed IT, management consultants, and the like too.

They should stop gastric bands and just wire the fat fuckers gobs up.

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3 minutes ago, spygirl said:

They should stop gastric bands and just wire the fat fuckers gobs up.

Baseball helmet and evostick might be cheaper.  Seriously though, deal with the root causes FFS, not the signs and symptoms.  Harder work sure but that's why we pay the polos the big money during and after.

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30 minutes ago, spygirl said:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-44665560

This was last years:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-40683915

Cuts to NHS homeopathy. I mean, for fuck sake, that is a toal farce. How any health organisation can justify running 2 homeopathy hospital is beyond a fucking joke.

'These include surgery for snoring, where there is said to be only limited clinical evidence of effectiveness and which poses significant risks to patients.

The others are: dilatation and curettage for heavy menstrual bleeding, knee arthroscopies for osteoarthritis and injections for non-specific back pain.

A further 13 procedures will only to be offered when specific criteria are met:

  • Breast reduction
  • Removal of benign skin lesions
  • Grommets for Glue Ear
  • Tonsillectomy for sore throats
  • Haemorrhoid surgery
  • Hysterectomy for heavy menstrual bleeding
  • Chalazia (lesions on eyelids) removal
  • Anthroscopic compression for subacromial shoulder pain
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome release
  • Dupuytren's contracture release for tightening of fingers
  • Ganglion excision - removal of noncancerous lumps on the wrist or hand
  • Trigger finger release
  • Varicose vein surgery'

Id ban most surgery for the over 80s.

Not even being a cunt to OAP. The chances of an 80yo recoring from some of the srugical procedures are nuts.

Being laid up for a 2 weeks finishes most of them off.

Ona arelated note:

http://tv.bt.com/tv/tv-news/what-is-the-big-nhs-singalong-live-and-when-is-it-on-itv-1136428044833 5

Its a cult, isnt it?

 

 

I wouldn't ban surgery for the over 80s, obviously case by case

My mother had a hip replacement at 87 that enables her to look after herself at home 100%. The replacement was on the NHS by a pioneering surgeon (Apthorp) as she is lucky where she lives. The scar was less than 2 inches long, there was minimal blood loss, she was walking the same day and ut of hospital 48hrs later.

Some of those treatments on the list I'd consider wuit important to treat, I assume the citeria allow that.

I'd want to see the following added to the list of 13: fertility treatment and sterilisation, cosmetic surgery, and tattoo removal. All could be private in most cases.

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32 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

I wouldn't ban surgery for the over 80s, obviously case by case

My mother had a hip replacement at 87 that enables her to look after herself at home 100%. The replacement was on the NHS by a pioneering surgeon (Apthorp) as she is lucky where she lives. The scar was less than 2 inches long, there was minimal blood loss, she was walking the same day and ut of hospital 48hrs later.

Some of those treatments on the list I'd consider wuit important to treat, I assume the citeria allow that.

I'd want to see the following added to the list of 13: fertility treatment and sterilisation, cosmetic surgery, and tattoo removal. All could be private in most cases.

Shes lucky.

Most hip replacement only occur after a nubmer of years, whehre the OAP has been inactive and has already lost a lot of muscle and has poor cardio health due to not moving around.

Major surgery on a 85+, followed by a 2 weeks laid up in bed, tends to finish a lot of OAPs off.

Maybe they just need to be better assesing on the individually rather than blindly doing the op.

Tatoo and boob jobs defintely off the list.

 

 

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4 minutes ago, spygirl said:

Shes lucky.

Most hip replacement only occur after a nubmer of years, whehre the OAP has been inactive and has already lost a lot of muscle and has poor cardio health due to not moving around.

Major surgery on a 85+, followed by a 2 weeks laid up in bed, tends to finish a lot of OAPs off.

Maybe they just need to be better assesing on the individually rather than blindly doing the op.

Tatoo and boob jobs defint Something the NHS is ely off the list.

 

 

It has to be case by case.

But, individual treatment is something that the NHS is very poor at doing - it is diagnosis by age group and then group treatment.

Not trying to be argumentative, but I know a 96-yr old that had her second knee replacement - again keeps her self sufficient and still doing charity work.

As you said, case by case.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Cunning Plan said:

I would definitely stop free fertility treatment.

It costs about £5k per go. Which is pretty much the annual cost of a child.

If you can't afford the treatment, you clearly can't afford the child.

It is also not very successful which to me is the key criteria. Often people have multiple treatments yet still end up childless.

Compare it to cataract operations which cost less than a grand and have a 98% success rate.

Surprisingly things like hip replacements in the elderly also have a pretty high success rate,  particularly as they are now often not carried out under  general anaesthetic. Orthopaedic surgery has improved beyond recognition from when I worked in a hospital in the 1970s. Then a broken femur meant 6 weeks in traction and almost certain death for older patients. Now they can often be out of hospital in 5-10 days

By contrast some cancer treatments have very low success rates with 80% of the patients dying within 5 years from the disease. Again that can vary widely depending on the type of cancer.

 

Edited by Virgil Caine

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14 minutes ago, Great Guy said:

Or we just stop treatment for non Brits?

The non Brits might wonder why the fuck they were paying their taxes then

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4 minutes ago, Funn3r said:

The non Brits might wonder why the fuck they were paying their taxes then

I get your viewpoint. However as it is pregnant Nigerians etc fly to London, have their baby on the NHS and then fly back to Nigeria. If you come to the UK to work or study I don't think it's unreasonable to buy health insurance. 

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Just now, Great Guy said:

I get your viewpoint. However as it is pregnant Nigerians etc fly to London, have their baby on the NHS and then fly back to Nigeria. If you come to the UK to work or study I don't think it's unreasonable to buy health insurance. 

Can't disagree that there have been documented cases but just try getting secondary care without NHS number it's actually quite difficult, I mean can't just swan in. Just the same as you going to say USA you're going to have to get your credit card out.

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2 hours ago, spygirl said:

 

A further 13 procedures will only to be offered when specific criteria are met:

  • Breast reduction
  • Removal of benign skin lesions
  • Grommets for Glue Ear
  • Tonsillectomy for sore throats
  • Haemorrhoid surgery
  • Hysterectomy for heavy menstrual bleeding
  • Chalazia (lesions on eyelids) removal
  • Anthroscopic compression for subacromial shoulder pain
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome release
  • Dupuytren's contracture release for tightening of fingers
  • Ganglion excision - removal of noncancerous lumps on the wrist or hand
  • Trigger finger release
  • Varicose vein surgery'

Id ban most surgery for the over 80s.

Not even being a cunt to OAP. The chances of an 80yo recoring from some of the srugical procedures are nuts.

Being laid up for a 2 weeks finishes most of them off.

 

Couple of things that I don't agree with you on.

Benign skin lesions. The underlying cause could be serious https://www.skinvision.com/articles/how-do-common-skin-lesions-look-with-pictures. Often if the diagnosis is early enough far more expensive treatment can be avoided later. I have a personal interest as I have had over the years a number of skin tags, often in areas where they are rubbed by clothing, like my neck for example, and are very irritating. They have been removed by a GP in their surgery. Occasionally necessitating a minor operation taking up to half an hour. I wouldn't have thought treatments of this nature would cause a noticeable impact on the NHS budget.

You have also missed off some issues relating to lifestyle choices that significantly impair health and well being: smoking, obesity, alcohol abuse, drug taking, impact sports. Should the taxpayer fund the lifestyle choices of those who choose to participate in some of these pass times, hobbies and activities?

Surgery for the over 80s? What about operations like hip replacement, cataract removal. These procedures are generally successful from what I understand and I know several people who have had them done in their 80s. These include close relatives so I have seen first hand how their quality of life has been dramatically improved.

As you get older perhaps you will gain a better understanding of how important some of these operations can be for the individual and their circle of friends and family. I am more tolerant and less reactionary about this than I once was. 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, sleepwello'nights said:

Why is fertility treatment so expensive? Surely there are plenty of sperm donors around and a turkey baster is very cheap? O.o 

I think a leaflet telling people that::

1. In most cases they left it too late by being too career focussed or too "I am a modern independent girlie and I don't men or babies" so they were selfish and now have to suffer the consequences.

2. Life is cruel and just some women cannot conceive.

The latter you can, arguably, make a case for fertility treatment up to a certain age - which should be much younger than the ages it is now currently given for - but the former really needs to be drummed into the heads of young girls in the 5th form.

 

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1 minute ago, The Masked Tulip said:

I think a leaflet telling people that::

1. In most cases they left it too late by being too career focussed or too "I am a modern independent girlie and I don't men or babies" so they were selfish and now have to suffer the consequences.

2. Life is cruel and just some women cannot conceive.

The latter you can, arguably, make a case for fertility treatment up to a certain age - which should be much younger than the ages it is now currently given for - but the former really needs to be drummed into the heads of young girls in the 5th form.

 

Truly compassion is our middle name.

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2 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

I think a leaflet telling people that::

1. In most cases they left it too late by being too career focussed or too "I am a modern independent girlie and I don't men or babies" so they were selfish and now have to suffer the consequences.

2. Life is cruel and just some women cannot conceive.

The latter you can, arguably, make a case for fertility treatment up to a certain age - which should be much younger than the ages it is now currently given for - but the former really needs to be drummed into the heads of young girls in the 5th form.

 

I think its a case of some couple just cannot conceive.

I know of a few couples where theyve split up after failing to have kids.

Then them knocking kids out with their new partner - both blokes and women.

Id love to see this investigated more - DNA mismatch and whatnot.

 

 

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4 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

I think a leaflet telling people that::

1. In most cases they left it too late by being too career focussed or too "I am a modern independent girlie and I don't men or babies" so they were selfish and now have to suffer the consequences.

2. Life is cruel and just some women cannot conceive.

The latter you can, arguably, make a case for fertility treatment up to a certain age - which should be much younger than the ages it is now currently given for - but the former really needs to be drummed into the heads of young girls in the 5th form.

 

Interestingly, the success rate of fertility treatment also declines with age.

https://www.babycentre.co.uk/x6119/what-do-fertility-treatment-success-rates-mean

It is a 7-1 against shot for women over 40 so serious money is likely to have to be spent to get a result.

In fact the one woman I know where it was successful was in her 20s.

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5 minutes ago, spygirl said:

I think its a case of some couple just cannot conceive.

I know of a few couples where theyve split up after failing to have kids.

Then them knocking kids out with their new partner - both blokes and women.

Id love to see this investigated more - DNA mismatch and whatnot.

 

 

 

I read something some years back that divorce rates are very high for couple who go down the whole fertility route and end up with no baby. Either it is the stress of it all or one party blaming the other.... or resentment over costs.... I don't know.... but apparently it is a receipe for ending your marriage.

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2 minutes ago, spygirl said:

I think its a case of some couple just cannot conceive.

I know of a few couples where theyve split up after failing to have kids.

Then them knocking kids out with their new partner - both blokes and women.

Id love to see this investigated more - DNA mismatch and whatnot.

 

 

Ovulating women prefer the scent of men that have quite (but not extremely) different genes of a particular type (MHC genes which are involved in the immune system). Pregnant women and women who are on the pill prefer the scent of men who are more similar to themselves. The theory is you fancy men who are a good match genetically and once you're pregnant you want to be around related males who'll protect you. The pill knocks all of this out of whack so women end up choosing genetically incompatible mates.

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10 minutes ago, spygirl said:

I think its a case of some couple just cannot conceive.

I know of a few couples where theyve split up after failing to have kids.

Then them knocking kids out with their new partner - both blokes and women.

Id love to see this investigated more - DNA mismatch and whatnot.

 

 

Maybe it was that the guy was firing blanks, and still is. Isn't it supposed to be that for 1 in 10 kids their father isn't who they think it is?

I guy I used to work with was convinced that his second kid wasn't his.

o.O

 

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