• Welcome to DOSBODS

    Please consider creating a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

Sign in to follow this  
Chewing Grass

Grass Fires

Recommended Posts

Huge amount of grass fires breaking out today as a simple news search will show with many a direct result of local councils letting open spaces turn into scrub and grass verges into hay meadows to avoid spending money on areas they used to maintain regularly.

Perhaps central government needs to invest in this sort of kit, just in case.

0630-05.jpg.4053eca1a12cd51236ec35ee83b1a019.jpg0630-04.jpg.4745cb34e74cdddc3fd4dd67cc802bb2.jpg0630-01.jpg.e837f80c2948ab7f07ab9a5b9cc89540.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Merkins have some serious kit.

It seems that the purpose of these planes is not to put out the fires directly - they can't - but to lay down a firebreak from which the firefighters on the ground can effectively operate.

The red stuff is retardant - apparently a mix of water and nitrogen (presumably some sort of nitrogen compound do be exact?)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some absolute penis has set fire to the protected sand dunes just near me. The air is full of smoke, it stinks and I sincerely wish the infestation of a thousand fleas upon their rotten arsehole.

9 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

Can be risky. I don't know why this plane exploded and disintegrated.

 

Main spar failure by the looks of it.

/nerd.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Sgt Hartman said:

Some absolute penis has set fire to the protected sand dunes just near me. The air is full of smoke, it stinks and I sincerely wish the infestation of a thousand fleas upon their rotten arsehole.

Main spar failure by the looks of it.

/nerd.

Maybe. The fuel tanks in the wings seem to have caught fire immediately. Perhaps the heavy load  and rapid load changes overstressed the spar or wing root attachments,

4 minutes ago, crashmonitor said:

I'm hoping for rain soon....house is in a wood next to a moor...no really.

Grab some matches and make your own firebreak.

You know it makes sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Chewing Grass said:

Huge amount of grass fires breaking out today as a simple news search will show with many a direct result of local councils letting open spaces turn into scrub and grass verges into hay meadows to avoid spending money on areas they used to maintain regularly.

Maybe grass turning into scrub is a good thing?

Benign neglect is likely to be good for wildlife and help with things like flood alleviation.

Perhaps wildfires are also natural....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As an aside to this, the landscape is being used differently and it is having an impact. 

Yesterday, I went to hutton-le-hole.  It used to have very short grass and sheep.  No sheep now and it looked to have been mowed. A right mess it was 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Alonso Quijano said:

 

Only saving grace is the rain will come and nature will recover.

Nah it's more melodramatic to instill  a bit of fear.

Bacchus only wept in summertime's driest days.

When the drought killed the vine.

Oh for the grace of God will it ever rain and save our mortal souls.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Sgt Hartman said:

 

Main spar failure by the looks of it.

/nerd.

Probably picked up a patch of heavy-water by mistake and it overloaded the wings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Happy Renting said:

Reminds me of the Fukawi tribe, who were 3-foot pygmies who lived in 4-foot elephant grass.

When they were discovered, they were jumping up and down shouting ''were the Fukawi'.

 

A little further north are the Oomatingi tribe, where the grass is a little shorter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, Great Guy said:

Maybe grass turning into scrub is a good thing?

Benign neglect is likely to be good for wildlife and help with things like flood alleviation.

Perhaps wildfires are also natural....

 

16 hours ago, One percent said:

As an aside to this, the landscape is being used differently and it is having an impact. 

Yesterday, I went to hutton-le-hole.  It used to have very short grass and sheep.  No sheep now and it looked to have been mowed. A right mess it was 

It's more natural certainly; funny how cost cutting by councils has helped the environment.

I am sure you will all be delighted to hear that it poured down for an hour this morning in Cornwall, replenishing my water butt to three quarters full, and there is a weather warning for heavy rainstorms today.

 

Edited by Frank Hovis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

 

It's more natural certainly; funny how cost cutting by councils has helped the environment.

I am sure you will all be delighted to hear that it poured down for an hour this morning, replenishing my water butt to three quarters full, and there is a weather warning for heavy rainstorms today.

 

Maybe but I was brought up with villages shorn by sheep. Sheep seem to be disappearing and landscapes not changed for millennia are now quickly changing  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, One percent said:

Maybe but I was brought up with villages shorn by sheep. Sheep seem to be disappearing and landscapes not changed for millennia are now quickly changing  

I was too but I think the phrase "green desert" sums up the close cropped hills of the sheep farms.  The changing is reversion to a more natural state that will support much more wildlife.

I would love to see horizon to horizon woodland and scrub rather than the current artificial landscape that people laud as "the countryside".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

I was too but I think the phrase "green desert" sums up the close cropped hills of the sheep farms.  The changing is reversion to a more natural state that will support much more wildlife.

I would love to see horizon to horizon woodland and scrub rather than the current artificial landscape that people laud as "the countryside".

You wouldn't see the horizon, all you would see is scrub, actually scrub doesn't support a huge variety of wildlife, a lot of wildlife is actually dependant on traditional farming methods as practiced over 100 years ago.

Many of the paths and cycling routes I follow are unrecognisable to what they were 10 years ago, you see nothing other than a tunnel of trees and a lot of the places where wild fruits such as strawberries and bilberries could be found have disappeared under smothering hazel and birch scrub.

Ancient woodland doesn't have this problem as the trees are mature enough to have smothered the scrub themselves which is why it is special as it cannot be recreated in under 200 years.

I'm being a bit optimistic with the 200 years as other organisations would say 400 years.

https://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/visiting-woods/trees-woods-and-wildlife/woodland-habitats/ancient-woodland/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, JackieO said:

Anyone seen sarahbell? :ph34r:

I'm here.
It's been smoky a few times here. Could see the Winter hill smoke very clearly when out on Saturday at the other side of Oldham. Down this end it's just the smell from the Tameside end of the fire. 
Have had to keep shutting windows due to stink of fire. It smells like bad neighbour having a stinky crappy fire. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NASA's fire detection satellites are a good illustrator of where the fires are...

Too much high cloud today over the S.west/wales/midlands/n.west to see those areas, but can clearly make out one on the Scottish Borders 20/30 miles inland from north sea...

Europe_2_01.2018182.terra.250m.jpg

 

Yesterdays gives a good view of one north of manchester, the smoke going way out into the Irish sea...

Europe_2_01.2018181.aqua.250m.jpg

 

Click for very hi resolution.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, PatronizingGit said:

NASA's fire detection satellites are a good illustrator of where the fires are...

Too much high cloud today over the S.west/wales/midlands/n.west to see those areas, but can clearly make out one on the Scottish Borders 20/30 miles inland from north sea...

Yesterdays gives a good view of one north of manchester, the smoke going way out into the Irish sea...

Click for very hi resolution.

That's cool, I managed to work my way from your images to the real thing.

https://firms.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/map/#z:7;c:-2.2,54.2;l:24hrs

FIRMS
Fires: Last 24hrs
 
BBQers, you are being watched, and monitored, continuously.
 
It does today as well!
 
Edited by Chewing Grass
https://firms.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/map/#z:10;c:-2.2,53.5;l:today

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, PatronizingGit said:

NASA's fire detection satellites are a good illustrator of where the fires are...

Too much high cloud today over the S.west/wales/midlands/n.west to see those areas, but can clearly make out one on the Scottish Borders 20/30 miles inland from north sea...

Europe_2_01.2018182.terra.250m.jpg

 

Yesterdays gives a good view of one north of manchester, the smoke going way out into the Irish sea...

Europe_2_01.2018181.aqua.250m.jpg

 

Click for very hi resolution.

'Pish! A woman might piss it out!'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.