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spygirl

Labour manifesto

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'Neil Coyle, Labour candidate in Bermondsey and Southwark and a vocal critic of Jeremy Corbyn, says some of the policies his party is focusing on "are actually what people raise as their primary concerns and want to see addressed".

For example, rising knife crime in his borough. The blame for that, he says, lies in one place alone - the former home secretary turned prime minister, whom he says brought about significant cuts in police numbers.

"That is a fundamental failing and Theresa May is totally repsonsible."'

Personally, 'd lay the blame the blameat the people who let the people who use knives in.and accomodated their lifestyles.

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'On one sheet of paper given to us by Labour we have all the costs, on another all the plans to raise money.

But it seems to me there's a lot of controversy coming - a row over these documents - because there's a large chunk of money unaccounted for.

It comes down to the difference between current spending and capital spending - the latter they can borrow for.'

Ahh, the ghosts of Gordons past. Class current spending and consumption as 'investing for the future!'

You might want to check that investment out a Wayne and Shazza 'invest' their ADHD money in EuroDisney.

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There was a chart on newsnight showing where Jezza and Tezza had visited i nthe last few weeks.

Tezza had be tolling round the marginals - shaking hands, kissing babies, eating rubber chicken.

Jezza had mainly gone to solid Labour seats and a coule of strongly held Con seats.

He really is a fucking idiot.

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Keeping things in proportion:

'Jeremy Corbyn is taking questions now and is asked about the degree of costing in the plans he has set out.

This manifesto is about rebalancing the economy, says Jeremy Corbyn. He says every other country wonders why Britain does so little about the "grotesque levels of inequality" - and that's what his programme aims to do. 

The creation of a national investment bank will help spread prosperity around the UK, he adds.'

Which countries? Go on, ask him.

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10 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

Andrew Neil grilling some Labour MP now about where the money is coming from - the boy he is asking has not clue.

Pople earning over 80K.

The simple response is how many people over 80K?

(I think its around 1m)

Then divide 80bln by 1m.

Figures dont really add up, do they?

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10 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

Andrew Neil grilling some Labour MP now about where the money is coming from - the boy he is asking has not clue.

Another car crash interview. May as well have stuck a cardboard cutout on. 

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'Shadow business secretary Rebecca Long-Bailey says renationalising the railways would be a capital expenditure so "wouldn't form part of spending plans".

She says the government could take out a low-interest loan to buy back the franchises and that wouldn't cost the taxpayer any money.

You would be increasing borrowing though, it's put to her, perhaps by £70bn?

"Well, £32bn was a reasonable amount that I'd heard from one particular expert, but it's a matter for negotiation," Ms Long-Bailey replies.'

Fuck me. Labour are going to buy the railways on a 0% credit card!

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Labour should change their name to "Jam Today!"

The trouble is, what are your other options? The Tories are the Jam for toffs party, and the Lib Dems can't be trusted not to shit in the Jam.

 

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5 minutes ago, SpectrumFX said:

Labour should change their name to "Jam Today!"

The trouble is, what are your other options? The Tories are the Jam for toffs party, and the Lib Dems can't be trusted not to shit in the Jam.

 

xD

very good.  

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The irony, vote for Eurosceptic Corbyn who will help the many (just ignore the economics and funding etc for the moment) or closet Remainer May who will help the rich. As Clegg says people do not really listen so will vote for our rich rulers who will ensure they do not lose out from brexit and also keep immigration at the current levels.

If Corbyn could deliver what is in the manifesto (let's assume he can) people will still vote for the status quo and keep the bosses rich. I suspect Churchill was right about his five minute conversation with the average voter proving a benign dictatorship is the best way forward ....

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Saw this comment in the Guardian...

 

"The public sector is propped up by the government. They fund it. The money flows from the public sector, to the private sector when the people working in the public sector spend their wages...

How hard can it be to understand this basic fact"

10,000 comments like that....

Despair.jpg

Edited by Burned Out

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9 minutes ago, Burned Out said:

Saw this comment in the Guardian...

 

"The public sector is propped up by the government. They fund it. The money flows from the public sector, to the private sector when the people working in the public sector spend their wages...

How hard can it be to understand this basic fact"

 

10,000 comments like that....

In fairness, the government does print the money

Edited by Hopeful

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9 minutes ago, Burned Out said:

Saw this comment in the Guardian...

 

"The public sector is propped up by the government. They fund it. The money flows from the public sector, to the private sector when the people working in the public sector spend their wages...

How hard can it be to understand this basic fact"

 

10,000 comments like that....

Somebody is saying that on this very board... 

Perpetual motion machine economics

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11 minutes ago, Burned Out said:

Saw this comment in the Guardian...


 

"The public sector is propped up by the government. They fund it. The money flows from the public sector, to the private sector when the people working in the public sector spend their wages...

How hard can it be to understand this basic fact"


 

10,000 comments like that....

I think that is trickle down economics.

How do I get to be the bloke drinking the beer rather than the one being pissed on?
 

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17 minutes ago, Burned Out said:

Saw this comment in the Guardian...

 

"The public sector is propped up by the government. They fund it. The money flows from the public sector, to the private sector when the people working in the public sector spend their wages...

How hard can it be to understand this basic fact"

 

10,000 comments like that....

I read variants from my (Northern) FB friends.

There's a large number who have no concept of money coming from elsewhere. It amazes me sometimes. These arnt' woolly 20 yo. Think 50_ people who've either been signed on or had a made up job with NHS or council. Absolute disconnect.

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3 minutes ago, Cunning Plan said:

I think that is trickle down economics.

How do I get to be the bloke drinking the beer rather than the one being pissed on?
 

Senior post in the public sector? (Possibly better not to be IT Manager of an NHS trust at he moment).

I have no idea how you get one of these, Probably by getting a less senior post, doing enough to get past the first year or two, then by being so utterly crap they don't know what to do with you, but they can't fire you.

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Nailed

' Labour’s plans aren’t really Keynesian and seem designed to repel businesses in a post-Brexit world. It is all about redistributing a smaller pie '

http://www.economist.com/blogs/buttonwood/2017/05/labour-s-economic-programme

Nailed x 10:

WITH the Labour Party 17 percentage points behind in the opinion polls, it may not be worth analysing the tax and economic aspects of its manifesto.

 

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2 minutes ago, spygirl said:

Nailed

' Labour’s plans aren’t really Keynesian and seem designed to repel businesses in a post-Brexit world. It is all about redistributing a smaller pie '

http://www.economist.com/blogs/buttonwood/2017/05/labour-s-economic-programme

Nailed x 10:

WITH the Labour Party 17 percentage points behind in the opinion polls, it may not be worth analysing the tax and economic aspects of its manifesto.


 

That's the same mistake Cameron made when he promised the moon on a stick.

The you get the 'Holy feck' moment if by some random act they get in and are expected to fulfil the promises.


 

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https://www.theguardian.com/politics/live/2017/may/16/general-election-2017-labour-tax-plans-manifesto-politics-live

'Critics of the Labour manifesto are focusing on commitments that are unfunded, and two in particular: a commitment not to go ahead with planned increases in the state pension age, which costs nothing in the short term but which by the middle of the century would cost billions and billions; and an off-the-cuff comment by Jeremy Corbyn in his Q&A about increasing benefits. (See 1.37pm and 2.04pm.)

Corbyn referred to two Tory policies that were introduced by Gideon in his summer 2015 budget, when he needed to find a way of implementing the £12bn benefit cuts the Tories promised in their election campaign.

First, he referred to the freeze in tax credits and working-age benefits. According to the Treasury red book, that will save the Treasury £4bn a year by 2020-21 (but less in earlier years).

And, second, he referred to the benefit cap, which will limit families to claiming £20,000 a year in benefits outside London, and £23,000 in London. Before 2015 it was set at £26,000. The Treasury red book says that policy will save the Treasury £495m by 2020-21.

In an interview with the So-Called BBC that just just been broadcast, Corbyn sought to clarify his position on benefits. He said Labour would mitigate the “worst effects” of the Tory benefits freeze - but not reverse them altogether. This is what he told Laura Kuenssberg.

We have set aside £2bn to deal with the worst effects of the benefit cap, which will help a lot. The benefit cap has very perverse effect, worst in the areas of high cost private sector housing such as central London .... The housing costs are the biggest element to it. So we will deal with that.

Secondly, we are increasing the living wage so those in in-work benefits, that will obviously effect them.

We are also saying that those on disability benefits, going through often the indignity of capability at work assessment, [that] that will be a medical assessment, not an official bureaucratic assessment.

So there are going to be a lot of changes there.

The £2bn we have set aside is to ensure that we deal with the worst effects of the way the cap operates ...

Bear in mind we have had two weeks to prepare all of these policy issues because of the way the election has been called. I accept the challenge.

In his answer Corbyn seemed to be confusing the benefits freeze (which will affect millions, and save the Treasury a huge sum by the end of the decade) and the benefit cap (which affects fewer people, saves considerably less).

There is no commitment in the manifesto to reversing the benefit cap, although Corbyn is saying the party will be saying more about this soon. (See 2.04pm.)

There is a commitment in the manifesto to spend £2bn extra on universal credit “for review of cuts and how best to reverse them”. (See 11.41am.) This would mitigate to some extent the impact of the benefits freeze, because the freeze covers universal credit and other benefits. But in 2015 the Tories announced a series of other cuts to universal credit, worth at least £5bn by 2020-21, as well as the freeze worth £4bn. Some of these cuts were abandoned by Gideon after a Tory revolt, but others were not. Labour’s £2bn will compensate claimants to some extent for these cuts, but will not be enough to undo them in full.'

No, Corbyns is not being devious. He just does not understand what hes talking about.

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