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Frank Hovis

Smoking - what else is known to be bad

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A thought triggered by  @M S E Refugee's post on the Odd childhood thread

Quote

 

My Grandmother smoking John Player Specials and my Grandfather smoking roll ups in their Datsun 1200 whilst my brother and I sat in the back,the stench was terrible.

I'm glad its now against the law to smoke with kids in the car.

 

I also remember many relatives smoking heavily through the 1970s such that it's one of the major smells of my childhood; it wouldn't have crossed anyone's mind to go outside to smoke or not smoke when young children are in the room breathing it in.

Smoking had been known to be seriously bad for you since the early 1950s

Quote

1950 was the date and Richard Doll was the name. Doll, later Professor Sir Richard Doll, physiologist and epidemiologist, undertook with a statistician colleague, Austin Bradford Hill, a study of lung cancer patients in 20 London hospitals, showing conclusively that it was tobacco related. As a result of this research he himself stopped smoking and lived to be 92.

https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090114130855AAMbXxR&guccounter=1

And I've read that some of the first to give up were heart surgeons because the constricting effect upon blood vessels near the heart was clealry visible to them duirng their work.

There were fringe anti-smoking groups in the 1960s but the government-backed / NHS campaigns only came in during the 1970s.

So that's twenty years between idnetifying the problem and the government doing something about it (if only campaigns) and nearly fifty years before it became serious - banning it in pubs, workplaces etc.

Prior to smoking you had radiation - uranium toothpaste etc. - and asbestos.

Is there anything now that is evidentially seriously bad for you but is still in that twilight state before the government takes serious action?

 

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2 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Is there anything now that is evidentially seriously bad for you but is still in that twilight state before the government takes serious action?

 

Spice? (legal high)

Might be illegal now - I know this was being considered.

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4 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

A thought triggered by  @M S E Refugee's post on the Odd childhood thread

I also remember many relatives smoking heavily through the 1970s such that it's one of the major smells of my childhood; it wouldn't have crossed anyone's mind to go outside to smoke or not smoke when young children are in the room breathing it in.

Smoking had been known to be seriously bad for you since the early 1950s

https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090114130855AAMbXxR&guccounter=1

And I've read that some of the first to give up were heart surgeons because the constricting effect upon blood vessels near the heart was clealry visible to them duirng their work.

There were fringe anti-smoking groups in the 1960s but the government-backed / NHS campaigns only came in during the 1970s.

So that's twenty years between idnetifying the problem and the government doing something about it (if only campaigns) and nearly fifty years before it became serious - banning it in pubs, workplaces etc.

Prior to smoking you had radiation - uranium toothpaste etc. - and asbestos.

Is there anything now that is evidentially seriously bad for you but is still in that twilight state before the government takes serious action?

 

Listening to James O'Brien?

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2 minutes ago, DTMark said:

Spice? (legal high)

Might be illegal now - I know this was being considered.

They're all very much illegal now.

It seems mad that you had high street shops selling that sort of thing up to 2016.  They had incredible profit margins as none of it was even taxed.

There was one shop featured on BBC3 and the guy was something like an ex cabbie who bought packages in bulk from Holland, mixed and put into little sachets for sale.  All entirely legal to the extent he was happy to be filmed but bemoaning the upcoming legislation which would put him out of business.

When I used to see legal highs advertised in the music press back in the 80s and 90s I assumed that they had no more effect than the urban myth of smoking banana skin; I didn't realise they were actually proper drugs.

Just now, ashestoashes said:

diesel particulates, mobile phones, sunshine, vaping, white bread/rice, sugar, bacon

Is any of that actually known to be really bad for you though; or just a bit bad for you but no worse than being overweight?

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17 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

A thought triggered by  @M S E Refugee's post on the Odd childhood thread

I also remember many relatives smoking heavily through the 1970s such that it's one of the major smells of my childhood; it wouldn't have crossed anyone's mind to go outside to smoke or not smoke when young children are in the room breathing it in.

Smoking had been known to be seriously bad for you since the early 1950s

https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090114130855AAMbXxR&guccounter=1

And I've read that some of the first to give up were heart surgeons because the constricting effect upon blood vessels near the heart was clealry visible to them duirng their work.

There were fringe anti-smoking groups in the 1960s but the government-backed / NHS campaigns only came in during the 1970s.

So that's twenty years between idnetifying the problem and the government doing something about it (if only campaigns) and nearly fifty years before it became serious - banning it in pubs, workplaces etc.

Prior to smoking you had radiation - uranium toothpaste etc. - and asbestos.

Is there anything now that is evidentially seriously bad for you but is still in that twilight state before the government takes serious action?

 

Energy drinks.

Amazed people let their young kids drink this shit.

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13 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

They're all very much illegal now.

It seems mad that you had high street shops selling that sort of thing up to 2016.  They had incredible profit margins as none of it was even taxed.

There was one shop featured on BBC3 and the guy was something like an ex cabbie who bought packages in bulk from Holland, mixed and put into little sachets for sale.  All entirely legal to the extent he was happy to be filmed but bemoaning the upcoming legislation which would put him out of business.

When I used to see legal highs advertised in the music press back in the 80s and 90s I assumed that they had no more effect than the urban myth of smoking banana skin; I didn't realise they were actually proper drugs.

Is any of that actually known to be really bad for you though; or just a bit bad for you but no worse than being overweight?

diesel particulates, mobile phones, sunshine, vaping, white bread/rice, sugar, bacon

heart/lung damage, brain tumours, cancer, lung damage, diabetes, inflammation,  cancer

I get a sore ear if I use my mobile phone held against it, ok on speakerphone. 

Edited by ashestoashes

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Frank, good thread! The things you cited were known in the academic literature to be bad, but were very entrenched in society, so hard to change. I guess there are a couple of obvious ones still, like "driving", "riding a bike/motorbike", "horse-riding", and "drinking", but these are smaller risks than smoking or asbestos. It does give me a nagging doubt that there are others though, but we're blind to them because they are so obvious. Perhaps "staying indoors and reading", which has lead to an epidemic of myopia (I'm not making this up)? There is yet to be any good studies that I'm aware of, but continuous usage of computers and socially isolating workplaces might one day be shown to be a huge cause of mental illness.

I remember reading once that there are really only three things you can do to give you a good chance of a long, healthy life: don't smoke, don't drink excessively, and choose long-lived parents.

Can I also suggest another angle for people to think about?: medical interventions that we will be horrified by in the future. I'm thinking, for example, of the eagerness with which the nhs seems to embrace hormone therapy or surgery for gender change amongst young adults.

 

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37 minutes ago, MvR said:

Neoliberalism and private debt-based money creation.

Sugar in everything.

Agreed on the sugar, in years to come we will be amazed at how much sugar used to be added to the vast majority of processed food. Having said that, the likes of aspartame are equally as dangerous I believe and that will come to the fore in years to come. 

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I suppose you have to say alcohol (boo).

Sunlight is a good one - as a thought experiment, imagine how that kind of UV exposure would be approached in the workplace - you would be head to toe in protective gear!

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1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

They're all very much illegal now.

It seems mad that you had high street shops selling that sort of thing up to 2016.  They had incredible profit margins as none of it was even taxed.

There was one shop featured on BBC3 and the guy was something like an ex cabbie who bought packages in bulk from Holland, mixed and put into little sachets for sale.  All entirely legal to the extent he was happy to be filmed but bemoaning the upcoming legislation which would put him out of business.

When I used to see legal highs advertised in the music press back in the 80s and 90s I assumed that they had no more effect than the urban myth of smoking banana skin; I didn't realise they were actually proper drugs.

Is any of that actually known to be really bad for you though; or just a bit bad for you but no worse than being overweight?

The known ones are allilegal but new ones apear all the time ,i like you thought they were some sort of fad until i a traveler/hippy girl gave me some methedrone to try at a festival back in the early 2000`s ,that was a what the fuck moment 

There are also plenty of natural legal highs out there  HBWR is one that`s becoming poular at festivals now and i suspect soon to become illegal 

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48 minutes ago, ILikeCake said:

Lead.

Agree. I'm sure I've seen studies that removal of lead from the environment (I grew up with both lead water pipes and leaded petrol) is the main driver behind ever-lower reported crime figures year on year. 

I remember 1980 having a rental car in the US and having to choose leaded or unleaded I was utterly confused. 

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5 minutes ago, Long time lurking said:

The known ones are allilegal but new ones apear all the time ,i like you thought they were some sort of fad until i a traveler/hippy girl gave me some methedrone to try at a festival back in the early 2000`s ,that was a what the fuck moment 

There are also plenty of natural legal highs out there  HBWR is one that`s becoming poular at festivals now and i suspect soon to become illegal 

They have given up trying to keep lists of illegal substances and the law now says if it gets you high it's illegal. 

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