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Libspero

Students Unions.. Why?

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Reading this latest story of knob-jockery by Manchester University’s students union, it got me wondering again..  why do Students Unions even exist?   

The answer, of course is that students all feel they need to have an NUS card..  mainly because of the promise of free/reduced stuff.  The problem is in reality that SUs don’t really represent students, don’t really offer any useful function..  and really just enable idiots like this:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/2018/07/18/rudyard-kiplings-poem-scrubbed-wall-students-claim-hewas-racist/

 Rudyard Kipling's 'If' poem scrubbed off wall by students who claim he was a 'racist'

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They don't represent students any more than Tesco represents shoppers who have a Tesco club card.

If the Universities recognised this simple fact and ceased to give them privileged status then they would be more obviously a fringe political group which happens to administer a discount card.

It does concern me that anyone who hasn't been to college might make the mistake of thinking that they are the voice of students.

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I wish I had the power to remove these people from the UK - teleport them to the Sudan or Chad or some other place where they do not have to be oppressed by horrible white British culture.

I would ban their families as well - all banned for life from any contact with UK culture.

Edited by The Masked Tulip
typos

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Liverpool weren't tied up with the NUS. As a result we didn't get their goody bag with a pot noodle and other assorted crap in.
We still got the freshers fayre though which involved taking as may free rules and pens as companies were stupid enough to give. Gate crashed on at Salford uni once too whilst going to their climbing wall.

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When I was at Surrey in the mid 80s we werent affiliated, the Union building and associated activities was run by some middle aged wide-boy as his own personal money making enterprise, and I have to say it worked well. We still had student union 'officers', and I think I can safely say that the lot of them were a waste of skin, and that is even, for my sins actually knowing several of them on a first name basis. Apparently it is now affilaited with the NUS again. No idea why that situation changed as it was a science and engineering uni, hardly a hotbed of SJW claptrap. Perhaps the lure of access to other SUs and all the feamles therein was too much?

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I've always assumed the NUS existed because of the romantic socialist delusion, dating I think from the European revolutions of 1848, that students are somehow 'workers' and do not belong to the middle class. I suspect this is what appeals to the hard core of lefties that actually run the organisation. The majority of student members I think are probably only interested in the cheap beer etc. Is it still a closed shop? When I was an undergraduate in the 90s one had to join whether one wanted to or not. 

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This is the poem they objected to:

The White Man's Burden

Take up the White Man's burden —
Send forth the best ye breed —
Go bind your sons to exile
To serve your captives' need;
To wait in heavy harness,
On fluttered folk and wild —
Your new-caught, sullen peoples,
Half-devil and half-child.

Take up the White Man's burden —
In patience to abide,
To veil the threat of terror
And check the show of pride;
By open speech and simple,
An hundred times made plain
To seek another's profit,
And work another's gain.

Take up the White Man's burden —
The savage wars of peace —
Fill full the mouth of Famine
And bid the sickness cease;
And when your goal is nearest
The end for others sought,
Watch sloth and heathen Folly
Bring all your hopes to nought.

Take up the White Man's burden —
No tawdry rule of kings,
But toil of serf and sweeper —
The tale of common things.
The ports ye shall not enter,
The roads ye shall not tread,
Go make them with your living,
And mark them with your dead.

Take up the White Man's burden —
And reap his old reward:
The blame of those ye better,
The hate of those ye guard —
The cry of hosts ye humour
(Ah, slowly!) toward the light: —
"Why brought he us from bondage,
Our loved Egyptian night?"

Take up the White Man's burden —
Ye dare not stoop to less — Nor call too loud on Freedom
To cloak your weariness;
By all ye cry or whisper,
By all ye leave or do,
The silent, sullen peoples
Shall weigh your gods and you.

Take up the White Man's burden —
Have done with childish days —
The lightly profferred laurel,
The easy, ungrudged praise.

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17 minutes ago, Bingobob said:

This is the poem they objected to:

The White Man's Burden

Take up the White Man's burden —
Send forth the best ye breed —
Go bind your sons to exile
To serve your captives' need;
To wait in heavy harness,
On fluttered folk and wild —
Your new-caught, sullen peoples,
Half-devil and half-child.

Take up the White Man's burden —
In patience to abide,
To veil the threat of terror
And check the show of pride;
By open speech and simple,
An hundred times made plain
To seek another's profit,
And work another's gain.

Take up the White Man's burden —
The savage wars of peace —
Fill full the mouth of Famine
And bid the sickness cease;
And when your goal is nearest
The end for others sought,
Watch sloth and heathen Folly
Bring all your hopes to nought.

Take up the White Man's burden —
No tawdry rule of kings,
But toil of serf and sweeper —
The tale of common things.
The ports ye shall not enter,
The roads ye shall not tread,
Go make them with your living,
And mark them with your dead.

Take up the White Man's burden —
And reap his old reward:
The blame of those ye better,
The hate of those ye guard —
The cry of hosts ye humour
(Ah, slowly!) toward the light: —
"Why brought he us from bondage,
Our loved Egyptian night?"

Take up the White Man's burden —
Ye dare not stoop to less — Nor call too loud on Freedom
To cloak your weariness;
By all ye cry or whisper,
By all ye leave or do,
The silent, sullen peoples
Shall weigh your gods and you.

Take up the White Man's burden —
Have done with childish days —
The lightly profferred laurel,
The easy, ungrudged praise.

There is more talent in Kipling's little finger than in the combined brains of every tin pot NUS hack in the country. 

They don't seem to grasp that this poem is ANTI imperialistic.

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image.png.f3463ed8077e3a9c27bcd1ce3d7e9dec.png

 

Quote

The implication, of course, was that the Empire existed not for the benefit — economic or strategic or otherwise — of Britain, itself, but in order that primitive peoples, incapable of self-government, could, with British guidance, eventually become civilized (and Christianized).[17]

 

Edited by JackieO

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