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man o' the year

Food preparation hardcore

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Driving back from Frome to Radstock last night I came across a roadkill deer. Strangely this was within 50 yards of one I saw hit by the car in front of me only 6 weeks or so ago. I then watched the BMW that hit it limp into a side road and I overtook the motionless lump in the road. Then had a change of heart and turned round only to find 2 guys already loading it into their car. Any way this time I was in time and knew the deer was not there a few minutes earlier when had driven to Frome. So it went in my boot. My manageress's son is a master butcher but was on a course today some distance away so I have butchered it myself. Yes it was messy and yes it was smelly. Not as rewarding as I expected - I am sure he would have removed twice as much useful meat- for me I found little except on the thighs.

My wife reverted to type - she was a biology teacher for 19 years- so the kids got a crash course in hands on biology by inflating lungs through a straw and disecting the heart, pluck etc.. 

Eldest daughter who is normally the more squeamish of the two was enthusiastic but other daughter when back from school on her last day was more reluctant, tired after a sleep over last night and all hot and bothered from school, with yelling "let's get it cleared up" didn't help.

Cleaning up was a big task but the actual butchery was fine and I glad I have done it but I wouldn't do it again as the reward/hassle balance is too negative.

I hasten to add that we will be the ones consuming said animal and it will not be going into the hotel food chain.

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Cool. How are you disposing of the bits you can't eat (which is most of it, by the sounds of things?).

Edit: and how big a deer is it? I seem to recall my grandad eating venison for months after he shot a stag that he suspected of eating his grass (he found its stomach full of fat hen when he butchered it, and felt a bit guilty).

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IIRC if you hit it you can't keep it but it's fair game (see what I did there?) for anyone else.

I came across a car/deer impact while on my way to a clay pigeon shoot some years back, the deer had a broken back and needed killing. Next on the scene was a police land rover, local (country) bobby "borrowed" my shotgun and dispatched said deer, then got me to help him load it into his Defender. "Evidence" asked the involved car driver, "no, dinner" was the reply :D A week later he dropped some nice cuts off at my place.

 

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I found skinning the hardest part and I had it hung up on an engine crane which should make it as easy as possible - and too late now but be careful for ticks.

TBH I don't eat red meat at all now but I was never that keen on venison I'd have always chosen a decent cut of beef in preference.

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2 minutes ago, Option5 said:

IIRC if you hit it you can't keep it but it's fair game (see what I did there?) for anyone else.

I came across a car/deer impact while on my way to a clay pigeon shoot some years back, the deer had a broken back and needed killing. Next on the scene was a police land rover, local (country) bobby "borrowed" my shotgun and dispatched said deer, then got me to help him load it into his Defender. "Evidence" asked the involved car driver, "no, dinner" was the reply :D A week later he dropped some nice cuts off at my place.

 

I wouldn't try and hit one in any normal vehicle these days as you'll probably still have the taste of air bag in your mouth when you came to eat the deer.

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Just now, SNACR said:

I wouldn't try and hit one in any normal vehicle these days as you'll probably still have the taste of air bag in your mouth when you came to eat the deer.

If they get the chance they tend to jump to try to escape, then if you hit them they come through the windscreen.....

image.png.1d24340a23e014c369e572d5bf4762aa.png

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8 minutes ago, SNACR said:

I wouldn't try and hit one in any normal vehicle these days as you'll probably still have the taste of air bag in your mouth when you came to eat the deer.

Mate had his Scooby written off by one, mind you I can imagine it was at some speed. Not far from Nunny Catch I believe.

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It was a male Roe. Not as big close up as I expected. We have industrial waste bins for the waste so that wasn't a problem although those at the other end may be in for shock. I have buried the head to dig up again in a year or so as my souvenir. 

The last photo looks like a more major event than our postman went through a month or so ago. He wrote the post van off. It seems we are infested round here despite the shooting nearby with some of our guests coming from The continent to return with trophies as apparently the number of points on antler round is better than most other hunting areas.

Yes that is my understanding too ie you cannot hit a deer and take it yourself. 

We seem to be doing our best to keep our end up here with deer RTCs estimated at 42,000 to 74,000 per year on http://www.deercollisions.co.uk/

That is lot of potential venison. My previous experience is that wild is tougher than farmed though, unfortunately, but we will see.

23 minutes ago, SNACR said:

I found skinning the hardest part and I had it hung up on an engine crane which should make it as easy as possible - and too late now but be careful for ticks.

TBH I don't eat red meat at all now but I was never that keen on venison I'd have always chosen a decent cut of beef in preference.

Gutting it was the worst bit. :Sick1:

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Wild Boar are a problem in parts of Europe, you can even get "wildlife" cover on your car insurance in some places (if offered it, take it, about £10), Reindeer and Moose in Scandinavia.

There are also different rules in Europe, in Germany you have to inform the police and the 'forest master', usually they pay for the damage not your insurance.

Reindeer are all privately owned and chipped so you tell the police who inform the owner. The owner is usually quite happy as the reindeer are worth more dead :D

Wild boar have been known to write off a car and then saunter off as if nothing happened.

2 minutes ago, man o' the year said:

I once (years ago) saw a transit van written off by collision with a Red Deer in Nottinghamshire on the A614 at Rufford. The deer shook itself down and jumped into the forest again.

They usually die later from internal injuries, they only hang around if legs or back are broken.

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Just now, sarahbell said:

Are you tanning the skin? My friend did with the deer they found in Scotland.

No, to be fair I shredded it a bit too much. My eldest's boyfriend wanted it to try tanning it as part of his re-enactment society actitivities but it would not have been worth it. I was more interested in the meat.

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5 hours ago, man o' the year said:

No, to be fair I shredded it a bit too much. My eldest's boyfriend wanted it to try tanning it as part of his re-enactment society actitivities but it would not have been worth it. I was more interested in the meat.

You should have got more than the thighs, I'd go back to the bin and retrieve the back, shoulders and collar.

This guy's quite good fun, has a good channel

 

 

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6 hours ago, man o' the year said:

We have industrial waste bins for the waste so that wasn't a problem although those at the other end may be in for shock. I have buried the head to dig up again in a year or so as my souvenir. 

There's a lot of nutrients in the guts/ skin/ bones etc. It seems a waste dumping them in a bin. IMHO, it would be better burying it in a garden/ field etc so that the nutrients are returned to Mother Earth.

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1 minute ago, Great Guy said:

There's a lot of nutrients in the guts/ skin/ bones etc. It seems a waste dumping them in a bin. IMHO, it would be better burying it in a garden/ field etc so that the nutrients are returned to Mother Earth.

I usually fling it over the hedge for the wildlife to pick at.

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Just now, Hopeful said:

I usually fling it over the hedge for the wildlife to pick at.

I met a guy that would put offal etc in the hole before he planted a tree. Tbh, it's a nice thought that a dead deer is helping a tree to grow.

I go  shooting with my brother. It's amazing how quickly a carcass disappears... Once we left a deer carcass out and it dispeared to a few bones in two days.... We assumed it was badgers...

I've heard one "trick" to feeding pheasants etc is to hang a dead sheep in a tree. The maggots soon take hold and they fall down where they can be eaten by pheasants. I really fancy trying it....

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1 hour ago, Hopeful said:

You should have got more than the thighs, I'd go back to the bin and retrieve the back, shoulders and collar.

This guy's quite good fun, has a good channel

 

 

Yep that was the main one I used although I looked at many. I was not that impressive. Some of the meat we had tonight and some was OK

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54 minutes ago, Great Guy said:

There's a lot of nutrients in the guts/ skin/ bones etc. It seems a waste dumping them in a bin. IMHO, it would be better burying it in a garden/ field etc so that the nutrients are returned to Mother Earth.

It was my first idea but our field is hard as rock and even with a pick axe I was making little progress- insufficient to stop a potential embarrassing incident with local wildlife spreading half a dead deer about in full view of our hotel guests. They delight in horses or sheep in the field but a dead carcass may not go down so well.

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8 hours ago, man o' the year said:

Driving back from Frome to Radstock last night I came across a roadkill deer. Strangely this was within 50 yards of one I saw hit by the car in front of me only 6 weeks or so ago. I then watched the BMW that hit it limp into a side road and I overtook the motionless lump in the road. Then had a change of heart and turned round only to find 2 guys already loading it into their car. Any way this time I was in time and knew the deer was not there a few minutes earlier when had driven to Frome. So it went in my boot. My manageress's son is a master butcher but was on a course today some distance away so I have butchered it myself. Yes it was messy and yes it was smelly. Not as rewarding as I expected - I am sure he would have removed twice as much useful meat- for me I found little except on the thighs.

My wife reverted to type - she was a biology teacher for 19 years- so the kids got a crash course in hands on biology by inflating lungs through a straw and disecting the heart, pluck etc.. 

Eldest daughter who is normally the more squeamish of the two was enthusiastic but other daughter when back from school on her last day was more reluctant, tired after a sleep over last night and all hot and bothered from school, with yelling "let's get it cleared up" didn't help.

Cleaning up was a big task but the actual butchery was fine and I glad I have done it but I wouldn't do it again as the reward/hassle balance is too negative.

I hasten to add that we will be the ones consuming said animal and it will not be going into the hotel food chain.

Fairplay something the kids will always remember. if you werent man of the year you ought to be. Remember as a kid my pet rabbit died and by chance we had rabbit that evening thinking my dad had killed it. Trauma has never left me 

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7 hours ago, Option5 said:

Wild Boar are a problem in parts of Europe, you can even get "wildlife" cover on your car insurance in some places (if offered it, take it, about £10), Reindeer and Moose in Scandinavia.

There are also different rules in Europe, in Germany you have to inform the police and the 'forest master', usually they pay for the damage not your insurance.

Reindeer are all privately owned and chipped so you tell the police who inform the owner. The owner is usually quite happy as the reindeer are worth more dead :D

Wild boar have been known to write off a car and then saunter off as if nothing happened.

They usually die later from internal injuries, they only hang around if legs or back are broken.

I had reinder once, in Helsinki. Delicious.

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I've been seeing an unusual number of pigeons and seagulls lying dead in the road recently. Not sure if it's the cars that are getting them.

 

Had venison once. Thought it horrible at the time. Lidl do kangaroo (beefy) and ostrich (intermediat between beefy/dark turky meat) sometimes.

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4 minutes ago, steppensheep said:

I've been seeing an unusual number of pigeons and seagulls lying dead in the road recently. Not sure if it's the cars that are getting them.

 

Had venison once. Thought it horrible at the time. Lidl do kangaroo (beefy) and ostrich (intermediat between beefy/dark turky meat) sometimes.

Dead as in 'whole' as if they just said 'fuck it, Brexit means Remain' and they just gave up the will to live and died, or dead as in bloody and battered as if hit by vehicles ?

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6 minutes ago, steppensheep said:

Relatively unsquashed. Was wondering if an angry resident was taking revenge, or if they were getting got by birds of prey.

If shot, you'd find a pellet. I assume these are rock pigeons and herring gulls, young gulls or mature ? Many birds aren't that aware early morning and can get clobbered by cars more easily. Poisoning gulls is illegal. I'd not eat rock pigeons or seagulls, or anything killed in an urban environment that's likely to have scavenged refuse..

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