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Collecting CDs/physical


Sugarlips

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A couple of years back i started buying decent quality 2nd hand CDs for pennies at boot sales etc. I loved collecting records as a kid and have recently relived that and had a lot of pleasure from building a fairly big (5000+) CD collection on the cheap. It started as a bit of a hobby but its snowballed quickly to the point that i could open a shop now..

Whilst not the primary motivation i can see the decent stuff becoming scarce over the coming years - in my life i've seen vinyl go from the standard way of consuming music (60s-80s) to outdated charity shop junk (90s-00s) all the way back to being a premium product (new vinyl) and a collectable scene that goes from strength to strength.

Same is beginning to happen with music cassettes, i rarely see them now in junk shops and am keeping my eye out for decent hauls

Im debating where to go from here with it though, keep buying and storing it away as a bit of a punt on future values - they cant drop in value much more than now surely? Im lucky that i have a bit of space to store them but dont want to turn into a mental hoarder type :)

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Bedrag Justesen

Diogenes syndrome awaits.

Vinyl - Yes.

CDs - No.

MusiCassettes - No.

Open Reel - No.

8-Track - No.

DCC - No.

Elcaset - No.

VHS/Betamax/2000/DVD/Bluray - No.

All with proviso of knowing your market for supply and demand.

The hardest part is parting.

I know, I was that soldier. :)

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 29/07/2018 at 13:27, Sugarlips said:

A couple of years back i started buying decent quality 2nd hand CDs for pennies at boot sales etc. I loved collecting records as a kid and have recently relived that and had a lot of pleasure from building a fairly big (5000+) CD collection on the cheap. It started as a bit of a hobby but its snowballed quickly to the point that i could open a shop now..

Whilst not the primary motivation i can see the decent stuff becoming scarce over the coming years - in my life i've seen vinyl go from the standard way of consuming music (60s-80s) to outdated charity shop junk (90s-00s) all the way back to being a premium product (new vinyl) and a collectable scene that goes from strength to strength.

Same is beginning to happen with music cassettes, i rarely see them now in junk shops and am keeping my eye out for decent hauls

Im debating where to go from here with it though, keep buying and storing it away as a bit of a punt on future values - they cant drop in value much more than now surely? Im lucky that i have a bit of space to store them but dont want to turn into a mental hoarder type :)

Somoene I know did indeed open a shop selling vinyl online. Their house was full of vinyl records.

I used to spend about £40 to £50 a week on 12" singles at HMV every week, and so amassed most of the 850+ records I have during the period between around 1986 and 2002.

vinyl-collection.jpg

I acquired a decent turntable from a father's friend which weas made in 1967 and endures to this day with a fair amount of TLC but the cost to replace it with something of reasonable quality is well over £2,000 so I stick with it. You don't get much for your money these days, turntables of good quality are massively more expensive than once they were. Same for the diamond styli.

I did recently inherit a stack of LPs from my late father adding yet more - some of our musical tastes were similar, and some of them are in a pile with me not really knowing what to do with them.

I buy most of my vinyl (ongoing) from Discogs so I could sell on there. But for things that are only worth a pound or two, I can't be bothered. It's just too much hassle. Yet I can't really bring myself to throw some away.

From memory a few that I have that are worth money: Bowie's Heroes LP, mint, first issue orange-label (c. £150), Daft Punk's Around the World 12", shrinkwrapped, mint (c. £35) and various albums in the £10 to £20 region. Several Oasis 12" singles are each worth about £15. But there's no one thing which is worth a fortune.

I do play all of this stuff from time to time. Indeed the sound quality of some of the vinyl records is really quite incredible. There isn't really a "plan" as such. I still buy; and did recently buy a 12" record from 1979 for a few quid. I also recently bought six WAV music files which cost more and are now simply buried away in the digital collection on the network drive. I wouldn't buy new vinyl since so much of it is just cut from the CD and so sounds pretty much exactly like the CD. There's no point paying £20 or more for something that's badly mastered and pressed and basically unlistenable. We've "lost the art" of this now, by perhaps two decades.

I do still have some old tape cassettes and a perfectly working decent tape deck. And a huge box of Doctor Who VHS videos in the shed.

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Long time lurking
On 29/07/2018 at 22:23, Bedrag Justesen said:

Diogenes syndrome awaits.

Vinyl - Yes.

CDs - No.

MusiCassettes - No.

Open Reel - No.

8-Track - No.

DCC - No.

Elcaset - No.

VHS/Betamax/2000/DVD/Bluray - No.

All with proviso of knowing your market for supply and demand.

The hardest part is parting.

I know, I was that soldier. :)

I use to think the same about MK1/2 escorts ..every scrap yard was full of them........ only if

20 valve Fiat coupes are looking good

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On 21/08/2018 at 11:00, DTMark said:

Somoene I know did indeed open a shop selling vinyl online. Their house was full of vinyl records.

I used to spend about £40 to £50 a week on 12" singles at HMV every week, and so amassed most of the 850+ records I have during the period between around 1986 and 2002.

vinyl-collection.jpg

I acquired a decent turntable from a father's friend which weas made in 1967 and endures to this day with a fair amount of TLC but the cost to replace it with something of reasonable quality is well over £2,000 so I stick with it. You don't get much for your money these days, turntables of good quality are massively more expensive than once they were.  

I like this diy turntable:

http://www.altmann.haan.de/turntable/

 

 

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2 minutes ago, jm51 said:

I like this diy turntable:

http://www.altmann.haan.de/turntable/

 

 

I can barely get the speed change lever to work all the time on my old Thorens deck. It is 51 years old and mechanical in nature - when you change the speed control a fork thing pushes the belt from one loop of the motor spindle to the other. It's about optimal in terms of sound quality and convenience but the tolerances are very narrow.

The guy who last serviced it builds his own too. He was really rather impressed with my deck. I felt almost guilty taking it back.

I've got so used to the sound of this particular turntable, tonearm and cartridge over the years. A touch bright (Goldring cartridge) but never harsh with incredible midrange clarity, punchy, detailed. Actually it has the characteristics of digital in those respects especially though the Yahama amp. I like a fairly neutral punchy sound with lots of mid (that suspended platter). Definitely "source first" going on here, the amp is a budget one (around £300 IIRC) as were the speakers (around £400 I think).

The TT has a speed control and a proper lid. To get that these days you're looking at something like the Rega RP12, the Linn decks with the adaptations/PSU, or the new Thorens range (though the Thorens of today is not the one of old, my TT proudly has a label "Made in West Germany" on it albeit the company was Swiss), so around £2k+.

I have the curioisity to attempt to make my own but my practical skills are somewhat lacking as is my patience (something to which many on here would attest).

There is a guy in Germany IIRC who reconditions these old Thorens decks applying an outer retro black casing, and they look stunning.

I would suppose that while the vinyl is indeed a "collection", thanks to my issues with a lot of modern digital audio, for me, it's actually a thing of practical value and does indeed get used. It would be wrong to say that it doesn't have "sentimental value", of course it does to a degree, and that deck often blasting out dance music might seem heresy to some, but it does make it as good as I've heard.

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I didn't look after my vinyl much back then so I doubt I'll do any better now.  

I don't like the regular digital sound much. Early CD players were mostly crap, only 12 bit unless you went mega expensive. Maybe hearing bad CD players early on imprints our dislike even when they get better?

I've had a Devilsound non oversampling dac for about 10 years and it's great. Non oversampling is analogue-ish in quality. For me, the devilsound is like having two thirds vinyl quality but without the rice krispies or having to care for/clean records.

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3 minutes ago, jm51 said:

I didn't look after my vinyl much back then so I doubt I'll do any better now.  

I don't like the regular digital sound much. Early CD players were mostly crap, only 12 bit unless you went mega expensive. Maybe hearing bad CD players early on imprints our dislike even when they get better?

I've had a Devilsound non oversampling dac for about 10 years and it's great. Non oversampling is analogue-ish in quality. For me, the devilsound is like having two thirds vinyl quality but without the rice krispies or having to care for/clean records.

Some of my stuff is mint. Others have been nibbled by gerbils (used to have the big cage/run next to the vinyl) and cats and the covers are in miserable condition.

I have these weird ears which hear distortion on attack and fade and at complex musical peaks with digital below 192k 24 bit. So much so that I can't listen to it for more than about 20 minutes. It feels like my brain has been baked trying to autocorrect for something I sense as a type of severe distortion - only momentary, but repeated over and over.

I have blind-tested myself with this. It's not difficult to recognise the original 24 bit 192k file from a downsampled 44k 16 bit version. Apparently that is impossible. No, it is not. The downsampled version sounds glassy, truncated and distorted.

I did get to hear one of the early Philips non-oversampling (1 bit x 16?) DACs (CD player) and it sounded incredibly fizzy to me. Though I think upsampling/oversampling is probably not a great idea. You can't add anything at that stage. I've heard various players over the years and the consistent thing that I cannot tolerate is sampling rates of only 44k. We went to see the last Bond film at the cinema and I could hear the distortion on the title track, FFS.

It depends on what my "listening mode" is. If it's just listening to stuff through my PC speakers like right now then even YouTube will do. If it's sitting in between the two speakers in the living room I expect to be "spellbound" by it and to give it 100% of my mental concentration.

Try MQA - it's absolutely incredible. It repairs all that. Precisely what it was billed as being able to do. I have one of those MQA DACs however the library of stuff is very limited (on Tidal) and so it becomes more of an exercise in what could be achieved if people weren't mostly half-deaf and actuallly gave a shit. And all had weird ears like mine that need some sort of algorithmic treatment to fix errors before the music is listenable.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 29/07/2018 at 22:23, Bedrag Justesen said:

Diogenes syndrome awaits.

Vinyl - Yes.

CDs - No.

MusiCassettes - No.

Open Reel - No.

8-Track - No.

DCC - No.

Elcaset - No.

VHS/Betamax/2000/DVD/Bluray - No.

All with proviso of knowing your market for supply and demand.

The hardest part is parting.

I know, I was that soldier. :)

how about the n64 

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Bedrag Justesen
2 hours ago, stokiescum said:

how about the n64 

Definitely a market. Trouble is everybody knows values so bargains rare.

Zelda playability, Nintendo retro gaming, solving puzzles, same with Sega Megadrives and certain games.

Might be specific to Wales, a lot of people won't play online, no interest in paying top money for latest FPS. I know one guy plays nothing but Earthworm Jim, Quackshot, Terminator, original Sonic the Hedgehog, and his favourite Flashback.  He's in his seventies.  

Commodore and Amiga games popular too.

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19 hours ago, stokiescum said:

how about the n64 

Check out the youtube metaljesusrocks. He and his mates are big into game collecting and go through a lot of what stuff is worth. Some of the consoles and games have appreciated quite a bit now. But I do wonder how quickly it'll collapse if there is a turn in the economy 

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