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One percent

Sepsis deaths on the rise

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-45045438

Sepsis deaths recorded in England's hospitals have risen by more than a third in two years, according to data collected by a leading safety expert.

In the year ending April 2017, there were 15,722 deaths in hospital or within 30 days of discharge, where sepsis was the leading cause.

Prof Sir Brian Jarman believes staff shortages and overcrowding on wards are partly to blame.

NHS England said more conditions were being classed as sepsis than before.

A spokesperson added that efforts had also been made to improve diagnosis.

 

there is a list of symptoms at the end of the article but no real discussion on what it is and the causes.  

I don’t remember this as an issue but suddenly there are a good number of people being killed by it  I’ve ywo theories, without putting too much thought into it but thinking about what has changed in society  

first is that someone has transported a new third world disease with them (how enriching) that the authorities do not want to disclose for obvious reasons

second is that it is just a bacterial infection as would be seen prior to the invention of antibiotics  what we are witnessing is the demise of antibiotics as an effective treatment  again, not something that the establishment would wish to share  

discuss  

 

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Antibiotic resistant drugs, caused by terrible production practices in India and China, rather than people not completing the course.

Lack of trust in hospital hygiene leading people to avoid hospital until it's too late. I dropped a spike through my foot last year, breaking and almost severing two toes, but I decided to treat it myself at home rather than go to A&E at the local hospital. I know two people who have been there for ingrown toenails, both contracted MRSA. 1 lost the tip of his toe, the other lost half his foot.

Improper levels of care post surgery probably plays a role too.

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Just now, Hail the Tripod said:

Antibiotic resistant drugs, caused by terrible production practices in India and China, rather than people not completing the course.

Lack of trust in hospital hygiene leading people to avoid hospital until it's too late. I dropped a spike through my foot last year, breaking and almost severing two toes, but I decided to treat it myself at home rather than go to A&E at the local hospital. I know two people who have been there for ingrown toenails, both contracted MRSA. 1 lost the tip of his toe, the other lost half his foot.

Improper levels of care post surgery probably plays a role too.

Ouch.  I think I remember you posting about that at the time?  Hope you are fully recovered. 

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Just now, One percent said:

Ouch.  I think I remember you posting about that at the time?  Hope you are fully recovered. 

I have lost some feeling in the tip of one of the toes, but they've healed remarkably well, thank you. I'm now back to running and playing football as badly as ever.

My wife still occasionally brings up how angry she was at my refusal to go to hospital. The fact that my decision led to a (virtually) full recovery with zero complications doesn't seem to have swayed her opinion that I'm a paranoid idiot with regard to hospitals.

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5 minutes ago, Hail the Tripod said:

Antibiotic resistant drugs, caused by terrible production practices in India and China, rather than people not completing the course.

 

Yup, antibiotic resistance is a huge problem. Few new antibiotics are being developed and inappropriate use has hastened the development of resistance to existing agents. Inappropriate use includes over-prescription of antibiotics in medical practice but also more worryingly  the largescale use of them in agriculture, game bird rearing and aquaculture to name but a few.  These poor practices have been largely controlled in the west, however China etc. is another story.

 

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1 minute ago, Ina said:

I deal with a lot of death certificates.  It is rife.

I know of several necrotising fasciitis deaths recently. Brutal.

We need a global push to accelerate antibiotic development.

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Why change the name? This was always septicaemia / blood poisoning.  When the boy died locally and his mother started a campaign to get GPs to recognise the signs I thought "Sepsis, what's sepsis?".

It seems totally random how you get it, I remember a Royal Marine dying from it on Dartmoor after scratching himself on a gorse bush, but agree that the reason for the increase in deaths is antibiotics resistance.

Not through people using too many, as the NHS lectures us, but through their industrial scale feeding to farm animals; there is so much in the faeces that some bacteria now actually specialise in using antibiotics as a food source.

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4 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

the reason for the increase in deaths is antibiotics resistance.

Not through people using too many, as the NHS lectures us, but through their industrial scale feeding to farm animals; there is so much in the faeces that some bacteria now actually specialise in using antibiotics as a food source.

Like plastics pollution, there is a shit-tonne of "blame the consumer" stories in the press, when in reality it is industrial production standards that are primarily to blame: https://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/stories/2017-05-06/big-pharmas-pollution-is-creating-deadly-superbugs-while-the-world-looks-the-other-way

Quote

Industrial pollution from Indian pharmaceutical companies making medicines for nearly all the world’s major drug companies is fuelling the creation of deadly superbugs, suggests new research. Global health authorities have no regulations in place to stop this happening.

A major study published today in the prestigious scientific journal Infectionfound “excessively high” levels of antibiotic and antifungal drug residue in water sources in and around a major drug production hub in the Indian city of Hyderabad, as well as high levels of bacteria and fungi resistant to those drugs. Scientists told the Bureau the quantities found meant they believe the drug residues must have originated from pharmaceutical factories.

The presence of drug residues in the natural environment allows the microbes living there to build up resistance to the ingredients in the medicines that are supposed to kill them, turning them into what we call superbugs. The resistant microbes travel easily and have multiplied in huge numbers all over the world, creating a grave public health emergency that is already thought to kill hundreds of thousands of people a year.

<snip>

A group of scientists based at the University of Leipzig worked with German journalists to take an in-depth look at pharmaceutical pollution in Hyderabad, where 50% of India’s drug exports are produced. A fifth of the world’s generic drugs are produced in India, with factories based in Hyderabad supplying Big Pharma and public health authorities like World Health Organisation with millions of tons of antibiotics and antifungals each year.

The researchers tested 28 water samples in and around the Patancheru-Bollaram Industrial zone on the outskirts of the city, where more than than 30 drug manufacturing companies supplying nearly all the world’s major drug companies are based. Thousands of tons of pharmaceutical waste are produced by the factories each day, the paper says.

Almost all the samples contained bacteria and fungi resistant to multiple drugs (known as MDR pathogens, the technical name for superbugs). Researchers then tested 16 of the samples for drug residues and found 13 of them were contaminated with antibiotics and antifungals. Previous studies have shown how exposure to antibiotics and antifungals in the environment causes bacteria and fungi to develop immunity to those drugs.

Environmental pollution and poor management of wastewater in Hyderabad is causing “unprecedented antimicrobial drug contamination” of surrounding water sources, conclude the researchers - contamination which appears to be driving the creation and spread of dangerous superbugs which have spread across the world. Combined with the mass misuse of antibiotics and poor sanitation, superbugs are already having severe consequences in India - an estimated 56,000 newborn babies die from resistant infections there each year.

 

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I wear shorts a lot at this time of year, especially when cycling. If I sit down on a beach or am walking with my bike dogs will come up to smell or pick my legs.

I jump back causing their owners to say something stupid about no need to be afraid of their dogs.

I point out that their dogs has been sniffing and licking other dogs bottoms or worse and people have got very ill with sepsis as a result of being locked by a dog. People have gone blind, or lost limbs or died.

 

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10 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

I wear shorts a lot at this time of year, especially when cycling. If I sit down on a beach or am walking with my bike dogs will come up to smell or pick my legs.

I jump back causing their owners to say something stupid about no need to be afraid of their dogs.

I point out that their dogs has been sniffing and licking other dogs bottoms or worse and people have got very ill with sepsis as a result of being locked by a dog. People have gone blind, or lost limbs or died.

 

How did you fail to spell 'lick' not once, but twice?!

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1 hour ago, Hail the Tripod said:

I have lost some feeling in the tip of one of the toes, but they've healed remarkably well, thank you. I'm now back to running and playing football as badly as ever.

My wife still occasionally brings up how angry she was at my refusal to go to hospital. The fact that my decision led to a (virtually) full recovery with zero complications doesn't seem to have swayed her opinion that I'm a paranoid idiot with regard to hospitals.

Always have a bottle of surgical spirits handy.

Youd be surprised how much that stuff can stop dead - athlete foot, cuts.

Zaps bugs dead and really helps your body heal.

45 minutes ago, Hail the Tripod said:

Like plastics pollution, there is a shit-tonne of "blame the consumer" stories in the press, when in reality it is industrial production standards that are primarily to blame: https://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/stories/2017-05-06/big-pharmas-pollution-is-creating-deadly-superbugs-while-the-world-looks-the-other-way

 

Ive long come to not trust either Chinese or Indian prouction controls.

Id suggest everyone else in he world does so too.

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1 hour ago, Ina said:

I deal with a lot of death certificates.  It is rife.

So what did deaths used to be blamed on?

When my dad died they chopped him up and wrote various things on the death certificate. Mainly I think to avoid writing oesophagus cancer. 
I don't think it was needed - it wasn't unexpected.

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