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TheBlueCat

Hard Work Books That Were Worth It

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I’ve just finished Anthony Beevor’s “Berlin The Downfall 1945”. It was an epic read that had the hairs on the back of my neck standing up multiple times but I can’t pretend it was easy going.

Anyone got any others?

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the bible,st james or old testiment though the latter is a rip roaring read of slaughter...quite enjoyable if you dont take it seriesly.a better story line can be found in the illiad then i found out it was basicly a big poem and lost interest luckily id read it by then.

id recomend the epics of gilgermarsh to get an idea of the flood and where the abrahamic religions stemmed from and then going back to when i was 12 read beowulf another poem ironicly but the first ever useing a sort of english.basicly anything ive read has a kid wont be easy going fuck knows why this sort of shit interested me then,it doesnt now but it did influence me,then you can start digging shit out by the venerable bead....

the most recent book to do my head in was lord of the rings and the others that followed it,to much verse in it for me ironicly,oh and the hobbit i was 89 or so pages in and some fucker in the pub stole it,why i dont know its like stealing a peter and jane book ffs.

just realised robinson cruso in its origional format was nealy has bad has reading trainspoting in the scots dielect version

 

Edited by stokiescum

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11 minutes ago, stokiescum said:

the bible,st james or old testiment though the latter is a rip roaring read of slaughter...quite enjoyable if you dont take it seriesly.a better story line can be found in the illiad then i found out it was basicly a big poem and lost interest luckily id read it by then.

id recomend the epics of gilgermarsh to get an idea of the flood and where the abrahamic religions stemmed from and then going back to when i was 12 read beowulf another poem ironicly but the first ever useing a sort of english.basicly anything ive read has a kid wont be easy going fuck knows why this sort of shit interested me then,it doesnt now but it did influence me,then you can start digging shit out by the venerable bead....

the most recent book to do my head in was lord of the rings and the others that followed it,to much verse in it for me ironicly,oh and the hobbit i was 89 or so pages in and some fucker in the pub stole it,why i dont know its like stealing a peter and jane book ffs.

just realised robinson cruso in its origional format was nealy has bad has reading trainspoting in the scots dielect version

 

Good recommendations but I’ve read all of them except the Gilgamesh stuff (which I will look i to) and I’ve read enough Irving Welsh and seen enough Rab C Nessbit not to want to try with Robinson Crusoe! 

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Just now, dgul said:

Atlas Shrugged, although I'd suggest that the stupid speech near the end can be skimmed.  

I read The Fountainhead (which also had a stupid speech at the end) and will read Atlas Shrugged when I have a spare few weeks. Ayn Rand was as mad as a box of frogs but quite interesting.

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+1 the Bible, though I've barely scratched the surface myself. Young's Literal  Translation seems intriguing, retaining subtleties that are lost in other translations.  Plus some good commentaries. Learning about the Kaballistic "Language of Roots" adds a surprising new dimension to the earlier books of the old testament.  Good commentaries help.

I'm part way through Gilgamesh in audiobook form too a a bedtime story. Very listenable. 

My big/difficult favourite is William Manchester's "The Last Lion" biography of Winston Churchill. So much fascinating history and insight into British politics from the late Victorian age through to the modern age. 

Full disclosure, I've only done the first 2 so far, in audiobook form ( no longer available unfortunately), since William Manchester died before he could write the third volume, which starts at 1940, but a new author Paul Reid, came along 15 years later and wrote the third one, and I'm told it's up there with the first 2.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Last-Lion-Box-Set/dp/0316227781/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

 

Edited by MvR

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26 minutes ago, TheBlueCat said:

Good recommendations but I’ve read all of them except the Gilgamesh stuff (which I will look i to) and I’ve read enough Irving Welsh and seen enough Rab C Nessbit not to want to try with Robinson Crusoe! 

try some hg wells,i had everything in its origional format at one time but concidered it crap at the time,only now do i grasp how long ago it was written prose etc has changed,you might love it or hate it.its not asaminov

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3 minutes ago, MvR said:

+1 the Bible, though I've barely scratched the surface myself. Young's Literal  Translation seems intriguing, retaining subtleties that are lost in other translations.  Plus some good commentaries. Kaballistic "Language of Roots" adds a surprising new dimension to the earlier books of the old testament.  Good commentaries help.

I'm part way through Gilgamesh in audiobook form too a a bedtime story. Very listenable. 

My big/difficult favourite is William Manchester's "The Last Lion" biography of Winston Churchill. So much fascinating history and insight into British politics from the late Victorian age through to the modern age. 

Full disclosure, I've only done the first 2 so far, in audiobook form ( no longer available unfortunately), since William Manchester died before he could write the third volume, which starts at 1940, but a new author Paul Reid, came along 15 years later and wrote the third one, and I'm told it's up there with the first 2.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Last-Lion-Box-Set/dp/0316227781/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

 

The Last Lion sounds worthwhile - I love a good Churchill biography - I’ll take a look. I enjoyed Bozza’s recent one but it was very lightweight.

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1 minute ago, stokiescum said:

try some hg wells,i had everything in its origional format at one time but concidered it crap at the time,only now do i grasp how long ago it was written prose etc has changed,you might love it or hate it.its not asaminov

Read them all already. I got a box set back in the 80s and did them back to back. Oddly, the History of Mr Polly was the one I enjoyed most! 

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Also, The Ragged Trousered Philanthropist.   Basically HPC / Dosbods published in 1914.  A similar mix of interesting people living through and arguing about a similar set of issues.. the experiences and moans of daily life, the economy, politics, the money supply, etc. All tied together in an interesting readable tale of life in a small English town.. It's amazing how little has changed.

And free on Kindle too.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ragged-Trousered-Philanthropists-Wordsworth-Classics/dp/184022682X

Edited by MvR

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29 minutes ago, MvR said:

+1 the Bible, though I've barely scratched the surface myself. Young's Literal  Translation seems intriguing, retaining subtleties that are lost in other translations.  Plus some good commentaries. Kaballistic "Language of Roots" adds a surprising new dimension to the earlier books of the old testament.  Good commentaries help.

I'm part way through Gilgamesh in audiobook form too a a bedtime story. Very listenable. 

My big/difficult favourite is William Manchester's "The Last Lion" biography of Winston Churchill. So much fascinating history and insight into British politics from the late Victorian age through to the modern age. 

Full disclosure, I've only done the first 2 so far, in audiobook form ( no longer available unfortunately), since William Manchester died before he could write the third volume, which starts at 1940, but a new author Paul Reid, came along 15 years later and wrote the third one, and I'm told it's up there with the first 2.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Last-Lion-Box-Set/dp/0316227781/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

 

the era of the last huge prime minsters we had does interest me,people like pitt,palmsaston disralie,gladstone and others,they were great oraters that could match and beat churchill,after all churchill was a man created to lead a nation at war but not much else.anyway im going to depart this thread before i get interested in reading again,the irony of not being able to spell isnt lost on me lol.

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1 minute ago, stokiescum said:

anyway im going to depart this thread before i get interested in reading again,the irony of not being able to spell isnt lost on me lol.

I'm similar.. maybe because I go for audiobooks when can. I love my Audible.com subscription. 2 credits ( books of any price ) a month for £14.99. Very good value, and the difficult books are so much easier to consume in audio form.   ( Though it helps to take notes of names once you delve into the Russian classics like Dostoevsky )

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28 minutes ago, MvR said:

Also, The Ragged Trousered Philanthropist.   Basically HPC / Dosbods published in 1914.  A similar mix of interesting people living through and arguing about a similar set of issues.. the experiences and moans of daily life, the economy, politics, the money supply, etc. All tied together in an interesting readable tale of life in a small English town.. It's amazing how little has changed.

And free on Kindle too.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ragged-Trousered-Philanthropists-Wordsworth-Classics/dp/184022682X

Interesting tip, will definitely take a look at that.

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The Koran.

 

Seriously.  Read it when I was in a Muslim country on business.  Mentally full of violence, hate, and clearly pre-enlightenment interpretations of the world.  Really crystalised my understanding of the death cult.

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Foucaults pendulum by Umberto eco.

Never have I  taken so long to get into a book, I must have been half way through before I couldn't put it down. I only persevered because the big head that gave it to me admitted he couldn't get past the first half dozen chapters.

20 years after reading it some of the imagery is as strong as if I read it last week.

 

Edited by SirGaz
Spolling

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Lord of the Rings.

Nearly binned it during another bout of singing/Elven poetry but I'm glad I didn't. It's an incredible book when you think about the effort that went into it.

There are a few that I did pack in that I might try again. Middlemarch bored me to tears in Uni but I might give it another go.

Thomas Hardy will never sully my bookshelves again.

Edited by Sgt Hartman

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6 hours ago, TheBlueCat said:

I’ve just finished Anthony Beevor’s “Berlin The Downfall 1945”. It was an epic read that had the hairs on the back of my neck standing up multiple times but I can’t pretend it was easy going.

Anyone got any others?

 

Try Cornelius Ryan's 'The Last Battle' about the same thing. Let us know which one you think is best.

Ryan's book was published in 1966. Beevor's book in 2002.

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39 minutes ago, Sgt Hartman said:

Lord of the Rings.

Nearly binned it during another bout of singing/Elven poetry but I'm glad I didn't. It's an incredible book when you think about the effort that went into it.

There are a few that I did pack in that I might try again. Middlemarch bored me to tears in Uni but I might give it another go.

Thomas Hardy will never sully my bookshelves again.

You might like "Bored of the Rings" National Lampoons parody, very funny if a bit dated and some of the in joke name changes won't register as they're old American brand names (Frodo-Frito a brand of crisps)

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1 hour ago, DTMark said:

Macbeth

Othello

i loath the bard,however the easiest way i found of consuming his works is simply go the theatre.i watched macbeth set in space in the future,and the tempest is pretty much forbiden plannet

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2 hours ago, Sgt Hartman said:

Lord of the Rings.

Nearly binned it during another bout of singing/Elven poetry but I'm glad I didn't. It's an incredible book when you think about the effort that went into it.

There are a few that I did pack in that I might try again. Middlemarch bored me to tears in Uni but I might give it another go.

Thomas Hardy will never sully my bookshelves again.

I first read the Lord of the Rings at 13.

Although Tolkien said he did not believe in allegory the Lord of the Rings is filled with truth, warnings and some similarities to actual events eg Siege of Minas Tirith and Siege of Vienna 1683.

A masterful book!

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33 minutes ago, JackieO said:

I first read the Lord of the Rings at 13.

Although Tolkien said he did not believe in allegory the Lord of the Rings is filled with truth, warnings and some similarities to actual events eg Siege of Minas Tirith and Siege of Vienna 1683.

A masterful book!

its was on my bucket list from 12 or so i just didnt bother,however when they decided to do the films i figured id better read them.so i could compare them.

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4 hours ago, The Masked Tulip said:

 

Try Cornelius Ryan's 'The Last Battle' about the same thing. Let us know which one you think is best.

Ryan's book was published in 1966. Beevor's book in 2002.

Will take a look, thanks.

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