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Frank Hovis

HPC Irish stylee (2014)

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I unsurprisingly missed this at the time but it shows how the top end of the market can crash and burn in a way that a three bed semi can't.

shane-filan-house.jpg

The three-storey property in Sligo comes complete with a lake, cinema, bar and a gym. It also has six bathrooms, a conservatory and a vast entertainment lounge on the third floor.

It was valued at €10m during the boom.

The palatial home of the bankrupt former Westlife star was initially put on the market for €990,000.

A wealthy foreign national splashed out €800,000 for the home

 

92% loss!

vmcG21.gif

Back of the net

 

https://www.independent.ie/style/celebrity/celebrity-news/westlifes-shane-filan-sells-10m-home-for-800k-after-two-years-on-the-market-30593237.html

 

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3 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I unsurprisingly missed this at the time but it shows how the top end of the market can crash and burn in a way that a three bed semi can't.

shane-filan-house.jpg

The three-storey property in Sligo comes complete with a lake, cinema, bar and a gym. It also has six bathrooms, a conservatory and a vast entertainment lounge on the third floor.

It was valued at €10m during the boom.

The palatial home of the bankrupt former Westlife star was initially put on the market for €990,000.

A wealthy foreign national splashed out €800,000 for the home

 

92% loss!

vmcG21.gif

Back of the net

 

https://www.independent.ie/style/celebrity/celebrity-news/westlifes-shane-filan-sells-10m-home-for-800k-after-two-years-on-the-market-30593237.html

 

It was valued at 10 million but was it actually ever worth that?  The real crash will be measured by what the celebrity (who exactly is he and what is he famous for?) paid for it and what he sold it for. 

Agree though, a house like this is going to drop way mor than a semi. 

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2 minutes ago, One percent said:

It was valued at 10 million but was it actually ever worth that?  The real crash will be measured by what the celebrity (who exactly is he and what is he famous for?) paid for it and what he sold it for. 

Agree though, a house like this is going to drop way mor than a semi. 

When are houses actually "worth" boom prices? 

A friend thinks their parents' house is worth £1m+.  I think it's anywhere from £400k - £600k.  It's only come up once but I know he refers to thier "million pound house".

Hard to tell with this one (he's a boyband singer by the way, though whether Boyzone, Westlife or whatever I couldn't tell you) because these public eye celebs tend to spend an absolute fortune on having the place exactly how they want it, something like two or three times the purchase price.

Personally I think it looks awful because of the stonework finishing.

 

I mean look at it!

2602-filan3.jpg

 

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3 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

When are houses actually "worth" boom prices? 

A friend thinks their parents' house is worth £1m+.  I think it's anywhere from £400k - £600k.  It's only come up once but I know he refers to thier "million pound house".

Hard to tell with this one (he's a boyband singer by the way, though whether Boyzone, Westlife or whatever I couldn't tell you) because these public eye celebs tend to spend an absolute fortune on having the place exactly how they want it, something like two or three times the purchase price.

Personally I think it looks awful because of the stonework finishing.

 

I mean look at it!

2602-filan3.jpg

 

Ta and agree. 

I kind of don’t mind the stonework, it’s that kind of rough cast. The windows are not in keeping with the style which gives it away as a new build. It’s where the aesthetics often go wrong. It also looks cheaply fitted out inside, which I’m sure it’s not. 

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5 minutes ago, One percent said:

Ta and agree. 

I kind of don’t mind the stonework, it’s that kind of rough cast. The windows are not in keeping with the style which gives it away as a new build. It’s where the aesthetics often go wrong. It also looks cheaply fitted out inside, which I’m sure it’s not. 

It's the modern fake version of it though.  If you look at a house gneuinely built that way like this one:

37F9CACF00000578-0-image-a-19_1473192958

It looks great.  There are a variety of construction techniques going on but the main theme is that areas requiring strength - corners, doors and windows - are constructed of bigger flatter (and much more expensive) blocks so that you're not putting strain on mortar-filled gaps in more irregualr stones.  Part of the appeal is that the construction has been from what was avalaible.

In the faux modern version there is no such patterning to it; it's imitating a construction technique without understanding it.

Though I agree that without the Homebase windows and doors it would look much better.

Link for the proper country house:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3776767/Family-prepare-11th-century-country-house-starred-blockbuster-films-200-years-inhabitants-moved-out.html

 

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2 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

It's the modern fake version of it though.  If you look at a house gneuinely built that way like this one:

37F9CACF00000578-0-image-a-19_1473192958

It looks great.  There are a variety of construction techniques going on but the main theme is that areas requiring strength - corners, doors and windows - are constructed of bigger flatter (and much more expensive) blocks so that you're not putting strain on mortar-filled gaps in more irregualr stones.  Part of the appeal is that the construction has been from what was avalaible.

In the faux modern version there is no such patterning to it; it's imitating a construction technique without understanding it.

Though I agree that without the Homebase windows and doors it would look much better.

Link for the proper country house:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3776767/Family-prepare-11th-century-country-house-starred-blockbuster-films-200-years-inhabitants-moved-out.html

 

You just can’t replicate that, which is stunning, so no point in trying. It’s probably why those with money go for modern architecture. The original post looks like the product of money meeting someone with little taste or vision 

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I know of someone who bought a house in the Belfast crash 5 years back for 315K that the person who it was repo-ed from d hapaid 700K for.

It would be interesting to see what the biggest percentage drop was in the NI crash, but alas they have burned all the books and the Belfast property boom is back on! ;)

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56 minutes ago, One percent said:

You just can’t replicate that, which is stunning, so no point in trying. It’s probably why those with money go for modern architecture. The original post looks like the product of money meeting someone with little taste or vision 

I find it a bit sad how our masonry skills have been lost over the years. In the victorian terraces near me, the detailing in regards to the mosaic porch floors, granite pillars with carved stonework tops dividing each house which are solidly built. I’m sure the dross that live in these ‘now’ hacked up bedsits, don’t even begin to appreciate it. 

The new builds now are built as cheaply as possible. It’s akin to the pre-fab mass building breeze block shit after the war.

Edited by Sideysid

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3 minutes ago, Sideysid said:

I find it a bit sad how our masonry skills have been lost over the years. In the victorian terraces near me, the detailing in regards to the mosaic porch floors, granite pillars with carved stonework tops dividing each house which are solidly built. I’m sure the dross that live in these ‘now’ hacked up bedsits, don’t even begin to appreciate it. 

The new builds now are built as cheaply as possible. It’s akin to the pre-fab mass building breeze block shit after the war.

Ah, you have got me on my favourite topic, the decimation and hollowing out of our skills base.  No one is trained to do anything properly anymore.  Once those over 50 retire, that is it, game over.  

I was talking to an architect the other day, retired and he had his head in his hands over the level of skill exhibited by 'craftsmen'  Apparently they have little awareness of the basics.  An example he offered was failure to put a damp membrane under a cast hearth. Even I know to do that through years of DIY.  

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1 hour ago, One percent said:

Ah, you have got me on my favourite topic, the decimation and hollowing out of our skills base.  No one is trained to do anything properly anymore.  Once those over 50 retire, that is it, game over.  

I was talking to an architect the other day, retired and he had his head in his hands over the level of skill exhibited by 'craftsmen'  Apparently they have little awareness of the basics.  An example he offered was failure to put a damp membrane under a cast hearth. Even I know to do that through years of DIY.  

I have a Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud MkII I am half way through restoring (I’m not rich by any stretch, but I got it cheaply enough to see a hefty profit). Theres a hand painted line  going down the car, if I was to ever get it re-sprayed, I’m told theres hardly anyone with the skill anymore to replicate it.

That’s ‘progress’ for you. The British were once famed for quality craftsmanship and infrastructure that benefited the world, we have now become a ‘service’ economy selling over inflated bubbles to one another. The crash can’t come soon enough, and I’ll happily watch it burn.

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DPM under a hearth?  I can say with certainty, this wasn't ever done in the heyday of solid fuel heated houses, at least not in my geographical area, where I've removed hundreds of the things, and installed a few under the supervision of tradesmen from that era.  The biggest factor to consider with a hearth isn't dampness, it's fire, and most membranes will burn or melt.  I don't blame the tradesman for sticking with the traditional method.   I wouldn't put one in unless it was specified on the drawing by the architect.

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12 minutes ago, Sideysid said:

 Theres a hand painted line  going down the car, if I was to ever get it re-sprayed, I’m told theres hardly anyone with the skill anymore to replicate it.

To be fair i bet there was hardly anyone who could do such a job even when it was first made.

I work on pipelines, and pretty much all the welders are ages 55plus, with the most recent job i was on there were a couple in their 70s.

But why get your hands dirty doing shitty hard work for 10 hours a day when you get paid more for spending 10 minutes inspecting the welds and being a glorified box ticker as i am.

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35 minutes ago, Banned said:

Tha house looks nice for 800,000 euro its a relative bargain,

No helipad, which, given its location, would seem to be a requirement.  Only 10 miles from an airstrip, though, which would probably suffice.

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18 minutes ago, dgul said:

No helipad, which, given its location, would seem to be a requirement.  Only 10 miles from an airstrip, though, which would probably suffice.

As someone who has had to frequently fly on helicopters id rather walk.

 

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3 hours ago, Sideysid said:

I find it a bit sad how our masonry skills have been lost over the years. In the victorian terraces near me, the detailing in regards to the mosaic porch floors, granite pillars with carved stonework tops dividing each house which are solidly built. I’m sure the dross that live in these ‘now’ hacked up bedsits, don’t even begin to appreciate it. 

The new builds now are built as cheaply as possible. It’s akin to the pre-fab mass building breeze block shit after the war.

Houses have always been built to a price in order to make a profit.  That detailing would have added to the cost and also selling price of the house but at a time when such skills were readily available so would not have been the cost that they are today.

These days however house specifications are trimmed to the bone in order to bring down the price per square metre and I have been involved in negotiations about this.

There is plenty that the buyer won't notice - stick in a cheap plastic drainage pipe rather than a ceramic one.  This has been driven by the increases in cost of building land through house builder competition ramping up since the 80s and the need to maintain margins despite paying an extra, say, £40k a plot so most of that £40k comes out of the spec.   A big no no in my book is timber framing which came in in the 80s and is purely done for speed (less time on site - less costs).

Knowing what I know about modern building standards is why I bought a house from the 1970s.

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12 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Houses have always been built to a price in order to make a profit.  That detailing would have added to the cost and also selling price of the house but at a time when such skills were readily available so would not have been the cost that they are today. 

The people building the old houses were craftsmen and enjoyed showing off their skills, often as a form of advertising to prospective clients. More money and time was spent on the building as the land was relatively cheap, also they tended not to borrow as much against the sale so there was less pressure to get it thrown up and sold.

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6 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

I unsurprisingly missed this at the time but it shows how the top end of the market can crash and burn in a way that a three bed semi can't.

shane-filan-house.jpg

The three-storey property in Sligo comes complete with a lake, cinema, bar and a gym. It also has six bathrooms, a conservatory and a vast entertainment lounge on the third floor.

It was valued at €10m during the boom.

The palatial home of the bankrupt former Westlife star was initially put on the market for €990,000.

A wealthy foreign national splashed out €800,000 for the home

 

92% loss!

vmcG21.gif

Back of the net

 

https://www.independent.ie/style/celebrity/celebrity-news/westlifes-shane-filan-sells-10m-home-for-800k-after-two-years-on-the-market-30593237.html

 

impressive loss.

I've noticed lately a lot of the upper end in Leicestershire starting to search for  the bid with reductions.It's not a rush yet,but the amount of people with the liquidity to buy the higher end places reduces in a recession.

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6 hours ago, Option5 said:

The people building the old houses were craftsmen and enjoyed showing off their skills, often as a form of advertising to prospective clients. More money and time was spent on the building as the land was relatively cheap, also they tended not to borrow as much against the sale so there was less pressure to get it thrown up and sold.

Before we get all `dewey eyed` and romanticize about the halcyon days of craftsmen enjoying their work and being proud of their skills lets get real...they did the job properly as they worked/lived where their present/future jobs were and so if they cut corners the word got around and they would have gone hungry...nowadays they are gone after the snagging, that is if they don't pay someone else to do it!

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4 minutes ago, MrXxx said:

Before we get all `dewey eyed` and romanticize about the halcyon days of craftsmen enjoying their work and being proud of their skills lets get real...they did the job properly as they worked/lived where their present/future jobs were and so if they cut corners the word got around and they would have gone hungry...nowadays they are gone after the snagging, that is if they don't pay someone else to do it!

Quite, they had an audience who knew who they were, the better craftsman got the best jobs.

Are you suggesting that the old craftsman didn't have pride in their work and only did a good job for expediency?

 

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What I am suggesting is that people are people, some if the system allows them to will try to gain a financial advantage by cheating it, whilst others will forsake this gain to maintain their personal pride...what I am sure of is that in days gone by there would have been `cowboy` craftsmen.

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