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Turned Out Nice Again

Avoiding cancer thread

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A close friend mine, same age has me (~60),  has just been given a stage 4 colorectal cancer diagnosis out of the blue with only palliative chemo being offered as a treatment so it's not looking good for him.

This has got me thinking about what I could realistically do in the way of diagnostics/ prevention to improve my chances of avoiding the same fate.

I think an elective colonoscopy is probably a no-brainer at 60.

Being bald and of Irish stock I already visit a dermatologist every year, usually when I notice persistent or otherwise unusual marks on my skin, with everything so far having been eliminated as benign stuff (keratosis/ veins etc) and lasered or scraped off. It helps that my Consultant dermatologist is a foxy Czech lady (albeit married sadly).

Any other ideas?

 

Edited by Turned Out Nice Again

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2 minutes ago, sarahbell said:


Don't holiday in Spain for six months of the year. Bloke we know is having another cancer removed from his back before he flies back out.

O.o

 

another thing I am grateful to Australia for is how much they educated me about the dangers of sunshine.  Growing up in the UK, slip slap slop was never mentioned - now I am religious about using shade, screen, and appropriate clothing, and indoctrinate my kids as well.

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10 minutes ago, Turned Out Nice Again said:

A close friend mine, same age has me (~60),  has just been given a stage 4 colorectal cancer diagnosis out of the blue with only palliative chemo being offered as a treatment so it's not looking good for him.

This has got me thinking about what I could realistically do in the way of diagnostics/ prevention to improve my chances of avoiding the same fate.

I think an elective colonoscopy is probably a no-brainer at 60.

Being bald and of Irish stock I already visit a dermatologist every year, usually when I notice persistent or otherwise unusual marks on my skin, with everything so far having been eliminated as benign stuff (keratosis/ veins etc) and lasered or scraped off. It helps that my Consultant dermatologist is a foxy Czech lady (albeit married sadly).

Any other ideas?

 

More and more evidence is showing that fasting can ward off the big C.  I will dig out some studies later.   Some people are now doing a complete water fast for 3-7 days every 6 months.  The theory being that it takes several days to completely run down you glucose stores and in turn kill off embryonic cancer cells.

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13 minutes ago, Turned Out Nice Again said:

Any other ideas?

Low-carbohydrate, high-protein diets may reduce both tumor growth rates and cancer risk

"When asked to speculate on the biological mechanism, Krystal said that tumor cells, unlike normal cells, need significantly more glucose to grow and thrive. Restricting carbohydrate intake can significantly limit blood glucose and insulin, a hormone that has been shown in many independent studies to promote tumor growth in both humans and mice."

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19 minutes ago, montecristo said:

More and more evidence is showing that fasting can ward off the big C.  I will dig out some studies later.   Some people are now doing a complete water fast for 3-7 days every 6 months.  The theory being that it takes several days to completely run down you glucose stores and in turn kill off embryonic cancer cells.

Yes, I've pointed my friend in this direction (if only during his chemo) but like just about everybody else I've known in his position, he doesn't want to know and has put himself entirely in the hands of his oncologists, who generally downplay all alternative approaches.

 

Edited by Turned Out Nice Again

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23 minutes ago, montecristo said:

More and more evidence is showing that fasting can ward off the big C.  I will dig out some studies later.   Some people are now doing a complete water fast for 3-7 days every 6 months.  The theory being that it takes several days to completely run down you glucose stores and in turn kill off embryonic cancer cells.

Supermarkets are helping
https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/supermarket-empty-shelves-anger-baffled-12979255

 

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7 minutes ago, Turned Out Nice Again said:

Yes, I've pointed my friend in this direction (if only during his chemo) but like just about everybody else I've known in his position, he doesn't want to know and has put himself entirely in the hands of his oncologists, who generally downplay all alternative approaches.

 

Yep,  unfortunately all you can do is show him the latest studies etc but if he is not interested then there is not much more you can do.  

 

https://news.usc.edu/103972/fasting-like-diet-turns-the-immune-system-against-cancer/

https://health.usnews.com/health-care/patient-advice/articles/2018-04-20/can-fasting-improve-chemotherapys-effects

3 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

:) reading the mirror article you argue that Brexit cures cancer.

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17 minutes ago, whitevanman said:

My mum died of lung cancer. She never smoked a single cigarette in her whole life. 

Smoking for the win!

There's an old Irish saying. Every old sock meets an old shoe.

Oops, not that one.

What's for you, you will have.

Maybe the best advice is to live your life as you wish and ignore all advice.

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54 minutes ago, Turned Out Nice Again said:

A close friend mine, same age has me (~60),  has just been given a stage 4 colorectal cancer diagnosis out of the blue with only palliative chemo being offered as a treatment so it's not looking good for him.

This has got me thinking about what I could realistically do in the way of diagnostics/ prevention to improve my chances of avoiding the same fate.

I think an elective colonoscopy is probably a no-brainer at 60.

Being bald and of Irish stock I already visit a dermatologist every year, usually when I notice persistent or otherwise unusual marks on my skin, with everything so far having been eliminated as benign stuff (keratosis/ veins etc) and lasered or scraped off. It helps that my Consultant dermatologist is a foxy Czech lady (albeit married sadly).

Any other ideas?

 

Remove processed meat completely from the diet. It's classed as a carcinogen. Limit red meat.

Easy on the booze.

Keep the body fat low.

Read up on angiogenesis (formation of new blood supplies to tumors) inhibition via lowered IGF1 ect...and see if you think that's something that you find convincing and whether there are steps you could take there.

Not sure about the colonoscopy; I've heard some skeptics say you should stay away....worth taking on board the skeptical view on that too.

Edited by JoeDavola

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47 minutes ago, wherebee said:

another thing I am grateful to Australia for is how much they educated me about the dangers of sunshine.  Growing up in the UK, slip slap slop was never mentioned - now I am religious about using shade, screen, and appropriate clothing, and indoctrinate my kids as well.

Don't overdo it though. I've been to dermatologists in the last few years for what thankfully turned out to be harmless skin lesions. One of them was from an ex-soviet country and explained the importance of getting enough vitamin D. Back then in winter they used to round up everyone and sit them under special lamps and stuff. She said people now are so paranoid about skin cancer that they were not going out in the sun enough and she was actually seeing vitamin D deficiencies in summer. 

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25 minutes ago, whitevanman said:

My mum died of lung cancer. She never smoked a single cigarette in her whole life. 

Smoking for the win!

That sucks.

A school friend's mum (also never a smoker, and a SAHM),  died within weeks of being diagnosed with lung cancer, while my mum smoked a pack every day for as long as I can remember (growing up), refused to accept it might be bad for her and died (quickly) of a heart attack aged 83 being in pretty good shape. (Apart from her heart apparently.)

Guess mum's (fatal) HA was probably smoking related but she got off lightly. Wasn't ill and was independent and functioning (smoking) well to the end. (I was always worried about her getting lung cancer or COPD so the HA was in a way a good way to go IMO.)

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3 minutes ago, JoeDavola said:

Remove processed meat completely from the diet. It's classed as a carcinogen. Limit red meat.

Easy on the booze.

Keep the body fat low.

Read up on angiogenesis (formation of new blood supplies to tumors) inhibition via lowered IGF1 ect...and see if you think that's something that you find convincing and whether there are steps you could take there.

Not sure about the colonoscopy; I've heard some skeptics say you should stay away....worth taking on board the skeptical view on that too.

All good advice. Once you get to be 60 the NHS automatically sends you bowel cancer testing strips which you have to paste a bit of your shit over three separate days and send them off to the lab. Research shows 60 can be too late so they are reducing the age to 50.

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1 hour ago, Turned Out Nice Again said:

A close friend mine, same age has me (~60),  has just been given a stage 4 colorectal cancer diagnosis out of the blue with only palliative chemo being offered as a treatment so it's not looking good for him.

This has got me thinking about what I could realistically do in the way of diagnostics/ prevention to improve my chances of avoiding the same fate.

I think an elective colonoscopy is probably a no-brainer at 60.

Being bald and of Irish stock I already visit a dermatologist every year, usually when I notice persistent or otherwise unusual marks on my skin, with everything so far having been eliminated as benign stuff (keratosis/ veins etc) and lasered or scraped off. It helps that my Consultant dermatologist is a foxy Czech lady (albeit married sadly).

Any other ideas?

 

so chemo is going to make him feel sick during the time he has left, not sure I would do that myself. painkillers and round the world trip or other pleasurable activities

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9 minutes ago, Funn3r said:

Don't overdo it though. I've been to dermatologists in the last few years for what thankfully turned out to be harmless skin lesions. One of them was from an ex-soviet country and explained the importance of getting enough vitamin D. Back then in winter they used to round up everyone and sit them under special lamps and stuff. She said people now are so paranoid about skin cancer that they were not going out in the sun enough and she was actually seeing vitamin D deficiencies in summer. 

I saw something on TV a while back. 

Was a controversial doctor bod who thinks that skin cancer actually shows good signs. He thinks the actual benefits of getting sun outweigh the negatives so when he sees folk coming in with wee things to be cut off he's happy. 

It wasn't actually vitamin D iirc - it was some reaction that it does with your body. Can't remember exactly.

Anyway they had an opposing doctor on to explain the other side. Interesting thing was even the opposing doctor didn't argue with the "controversial" doctors facts. She agreed. She just thought we should still cover up but that his theory was difficult to argue with. 

4 minutes ago, ashestoashes said:

so chemo is going to make him feel sick during the time he has left, not sure I would do that myself. painkillers and round the world trip or other pleasurable activities

Heroin and hookers. What's to lose :Old:;)

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i doubt you can avoid it, might be able to delay it/mitigate it, which is as good as avoiding it if you croak(due to something else) before it takes hold.

Its the reason why the space agencies like using astronauts > 40 years old, the lack of atmosphere they encounter greatly increases their chance of cancer causing radiation hitting them, that they reckon will manifest itself in 25 years or so, hence theyll be nie on kicking the bucket anyways before the cancer grabs them.

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1. Stop smoking, try not to drink too much.

2. Lots of veg in your diet,  go easy on the bacon

3. Keep your weight at a sensible level

4. Be safe in the sun

5. The big one. Be lucky.

Cancer is a stochastic process, and all the healthy living in the world may not be enough.

 

 

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  • Lose weight - cut out sugar - go low carb.
  • Intermittent fasting is supposed to be good also to protect against diabetes.
  • Don't smoke.
  • Try to de-stress your life.
  • Avoid red meat or eat in moderation.
  • Make sure your vitamin d levels are optimal as well as minerals like magnesium, potassium and zinc.
  • Do exercise.
  • Eat more vegetables, especially greens.
  • Don't read the news or anything that will get your blood pressure rising.
  • Avoid toxic thoughts and find an outlet for anger issues.
Edited by Game_of_Homes

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5 minutes ago, InLikeFlynn said:

1. Stop smoking, try not to drink too much.

2. Lots of veg in your diet,  go easy on the bacon

3. Keep your weight at a sensible level

4. Be safe in the sun

5. The big one. Be lucky.

Cancer is a stochastic process, and all the healthy living in the world may not be enough.

 

 

I am a bit obsessed but I truly think regular exercise is the key to a long and healthy life. 

We all have cancer. Daily. It's natural. 

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