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sarahbell

legal aid for?

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Does it say legal aid? I couldn’t see it.

If there is legal aid... why? Can you imagine any other country in the world apart from Canada and Sweden spending g taxpayers money to advise illegal immigrants of the best way of playing and beating the system?

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1 minute ago, Melchett said:

Does it say legal aid? I couldn’t see it.

If there is legal aid... why? Can you imagine any other country in the world apart from Canada and Sweden spending g taxpayers money to advise illegal immigrants of the best way of playing and beating the system?

Not unless it's asylum , but are these solicitors doing it for the love of humanity or is it big business for solicitors? 


From
https://righttoremain.org.uk/toolkit/yourlegalcase.html

Legal aid helps people with no or little income, pay for the cost of getting legal advice. The government allocates funds for this purpose, and the legal aid fees are paid directly to the legal advice provider.

In the UK, legal aid is available for asylum claims, but is no longer available in England and Wales for legal advice or representation in non-asylum immigration matters. In terms of legal aid, an "asylum claim" also includes humanitarian protection claims (on the basis of a real risk of serious harm/indiscriminate violence) and claims based on Articles 2 and 3 of the European Convention on Human Rights (the right to life; and the right not to be subject to inhuman, degrading treatment/torture).

Legal aid is still available for non-asylum immigration cases in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

This means that if your immigration case is not an asylum case and you are in England or Wales, you cannot get legal aid advice or representation. You can no longer get legal aid, for example, for family migration cases, including family reunification applications under the Refugee Convention; matters around student visas; or visitor visas. If you are facing deportation, you cannot get legal aid if your case does not have an asylum or Article 3 element. You cannot get legal aid for Article 8 cases - the right to family and private life.

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Exceptions in England and Wales

There are some non-asylum immigration cases that may still get legal aid: certain cases where there has been domestic violence; cases involving Special Immigration Appeals Commission (SIAC) proceedings; and certain immigration applications for leave to enter or remain in the UK made by victims of trafficking.

You can also apply for exceptional legal aid funding if you believe your human rights or European Union rights would be breached if you do not have legal aid. The Public Law Project provides information and assistance in some cases.

Legal aid for detention matters

There is still legal aid available for challenging immigration detention - for bail, temporary release/temporary admission (including challenges to conditions applied on release) and challenging unlawful detention. People in detention in England and Wales cannot get legal aid, however, for their substantive immigration cases (non-asylum) if they are being represented by a lawyer based in England or Wales.

Legal aid for asylum support

In asylum support cases, legal aid for challenging a refusal of support is only available in cases where both accommodation and subsistence (money or pre-paid cards) are applied for. If you apply for asylum support and do not apply for accommodation (because you can live with someone else and do not want to be forced to move anywhere in the UK under their 'no choice' policy), you will not get legal aid to challenge a refusal to give you support. You will also not get legal aid for representation at the First-tier Tribunal for asylum support appeals.

Legal aid for judicial review

Recent cuts mean it is now much more difficult to get legal aid for a judicial review.

 

If you are not a 'qualified person', it is illegal to give immigration advice/legal advice as defined in section 82v of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999. A 'qualified person' in this context is someone registered or exempted by the Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner (OISC), or another regulatory body (such as if you are a solicitor or barrister), or someone who is working under the supervision of someone who is a qualified person.

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2 hours ago, Chewing Grass said:

1hr once a week equals fishing for business.

Reminds me of the joke about the lawyer who puts up a sign in his window saying "Legal Advice - first question answered for free"

A local farmer pops in and says, "That sign out there. I know lawyers have a reputation for being sneaky. Is there really no catch, you'll give me an answer for free?"

The lawyer answers, "Of course. Now, what's your second question?"

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2 hours ago, sarahbell said:

Exceptions in England and Wales

There are some non-asylum immigration cases that may still get legal aid: certain cases where there has been domestic violence; cases involving Special Immigration Appeals Commission (SIAC) proceedings; and certain immigration applications for leave to enter or remain in the UK made by victims of trafficking.

Interesting....

So, if someone was to make another poster highlighting that legal aid may be available for victims of domestic violence within the immigrant community, and that this particular solicitors is giving free advice, then they would be glad of the extra business?

I shall answer my question in the style of the secret barista.

"What you need to understand is that for the last decade or more, there has been something fundamentally wrong with the Legal Aid system. It is a disgrace that highly-qualified legal experts are reduced to dubious means of grubbing for new clients when a simple solution would solve the entire mess at a single stroke. Pay the lawyers more money!"

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14 minutes ago, MrPin said:

Lawyers are bottom feeding scum! Now was a generalisation. I hope you enjoyed it.

I beg to differ.

I'm sure many law students start off with honourable intentions. In the same way that no-one joins Nestle thinking, "What these people really need is a more creative approach to killing babies..." 

However, they didn't undertake sufficient background research. Anyone who has read a John Grisham novel will be acutely aware of the fact that far too many young people graduate with both a law degree and an unrealistic opinion of their chances of becoming a successful partner in a large law firm before taking that early retirement with a trophy wife. Not to mention the hours of mind-numbing drudgery they will need to put in to fulfil the practice's main purpose: to increase the number of billable hours.

And these are the lucky ones. They have jobs in a field which may be relevant to their studies. How many end up in call centres or serving coffee?

I shall finish my rant with another favourite lawyer joke:

A lawyer dies, and arrives at the Pearly Gates to see a great big welcome banner addressing him by name. There are fireworks and confetti as he walks up a freshly laid red carpet to meet St. Peter personally.

As Pete shakes his hand enthusiastically, the lawyer mentions that he did not expect such a reception, and wonders aloud if everyone is treated the same way.

The saint grins and says, "Oh no, we only do something like this for very special people. Before you died, we added up all the hours you billed your clients and worked out that you must be 973 years old. This makes you four years older than our previous record holder, Methuselah!"

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