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Libspero

Random doors to nowhere..

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So,  we were walking the kids this afternoon and saw this..

5_A6673_C7_C7_A5_48_DA_A678_A69700848_F9

Little door on the first floor that seemingly ejects any lost guests fumbling around for the bathroom directly from the premises.

You see this quite a lot on old buildings,  and I’m sure there’s a good reason for it.  I just don’t know what it is.

Any DOSBODs door experts able to enlighten us ?

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10 minutes ago, Libspero said:

So,  we were walking the kids this afternoon and saw this..

5_A6673_C7_C7_A5_48_DA_A678_A69700848_F9

Little door on the first floor that seemingly ejects any lost guests fumbling around for the bathroom directly from the premises.

You see this quite a lot on old buildings,  and I’m sure there’s a good reason for it.  I just don’t know what it is.

Any DOSBODs door experts able to enlighten us ?

For you to load stuff directly onto the top floor.

Commonly seen in animal sheds -- you'd load hay (or whatever) directly from a trailer through the door, then, at feeding time, fork it down through a hole in the floor* to a grill that would hold it for the animals to feed.

[*the usual way was to have one entire stretch of the floor missing next to one of the walls (not gable) -- that way you'd have access to the entire length of feed trough below, but you wouldn't be at risk of falling down (due to height restriction).]

[of course, I'm sure the Victorians then used it as a styling thing without purpose]

Edited by dgul

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9 minutes ago, Libspero said:

You see this quite a lot on old buildings,  and I’m sure there’s a good reason for it.  I just don’t know what it is.

Any DOSBODs door experts able to enlighten us ?

There might have been some wooden outdoor steps at some point in the past, or more usually, particularly for working buildings, farming, industrial etc, there would have been a pulley above the door to allow sacks of things to be pulled to the upper floor.  Easier than carrying them upstairs.

 

Edited by MvR

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7 minutes ago, Libspero said:

So,  we were walking the kids this afternoon and saw this..

5_A6673_C7_C7_A5_48_DA_A678_A69700848_F9

Little door on the first floor that seemingly ejects any lost guests fumbling around for the bathroom directly from the premises.

You see this quite a lot on old buildings,  and I’m sure there’s a good reason for it.  I just don’t know what it is.

Any DOSBODs door experts able to enlighten us ?

Probably used to store something like grain or hay.

Once it's too high start bringing it in thru the top door.

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One possible answer

oldfarmhouse.jpg?w=300&h=300

https://bigbasslakemi.wordpress.com/2012/04/09/why-is-there-a-door-to-the-outside-on-the-second-floor/

At our old family house I always wondered why there was an extertior door on the second floor with no staircase leading down. My grandmother told me that some winters the snow got so deep that it would completely cover the first floor. If you tried opening the front door all you could see would be snow.

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ive seen them on mills, usually a gantry and winch or block+tackle type affair or remenants of such a thing from the past over the door.

Was actually to get street level bales of ? hay/cloth/raw materials into and out of the building at that level/storey.  Here i dont know.

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5 minutes ago, Libspero said:

So,  we were walking the kids this afternoon and saw this..

5_A6673_C7_C7_A5_48_DA_A678_A69700848_F9

Little door on the first floor that seemingly ejects any lost guests fumbling around for the bathroom directly from the premises.

You see this quite a lot on old buildings,  and I’m sure there’s a good reason for it.  I just don’t know what it is.

Any DOSBODs door experts able to enlighten us ?

I always thought it was access to the hay loft. There would once upon a time been a pulley system over the door. 

Some interesting stuff here about the history and types of barn

https://content.historicengland.org.uk/images-books/publications/national-farm-building-types/national-building-types-2014.pdf/

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ah, ive got it, its for villages with large spanish expat populations that cant afford a tower to throw a donkey from anymore, so they just throw a pony from the  top door instead. Its traditional and wards off evil moors from the village.

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Just now, One percent said:

I always thought it was access to the hay loft. There would once upon a time been a pulley system over the door. 

Some interesting stuff here about the history and types of barn

https://content.historicengland.org.uk/images-books/publications/national-farm-building-types/national-building-types-2014.pdf/

I'd never seen a pulley (for one like the above) -- usually it would be a case of park the wagon/trailer up to it and chuck the stuff up the rest of the way.  Remember, in those days stuff was packaged (if at all) at a weight that could be readily manhandled.  It is only in recent years that it became common to have stuff with a weight that required fancy lifting gear.

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4 minutes ago, 201p said:

surely with the snow that high it would dangerous to get on to it at that level unless it was pretty well packed or you had some sort of load dispersing system so you wouldnt go straight down once you stepped out onto it ?

Edited by leonardratso

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16 minutes ago, Libspero said:

So,  we were walking the kids this afternoon and saw this..

5_A6673_C7_C7_A5_48_DA_A678_A69700848_F9

Little door on the first floor that seemingly ejects any lost guests fumbling around for the bathroom directly from the premises.

You see this quite a lot on old buildings,  and I’m sure there’s a good reason for it.  I just don’t know what it is.

Any DOSBODs door experts able to enlighten us ?

More importantly, why were you walking the kids? Did you really want a dog?

And what kind of collar and lead do you use?

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Just now, dgul said:

I'd never seen a pulley (for one like the above) -- usually it would be a case of park the wagon/trailer up to it and chuck the stuff up the rest of the way.  Remember, in those days stuff was packaged (if at all) at a weight that could be readily manhandled.  It is only in recent years that it became common to have stuff with a weight that required fancy lifting gear.

I’m sure I’ve seen them on old buildings. I think as well as barns on buildings near quays and docks. This is America so apologies 

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/photocontest/detail/altered-images/storing-hay-the-old-fashioned-way-hay-being-lifted-from-a-tractor-pulled-wa/

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2 minutes ago, leonardratso said:

surely with the snow that high it would dangerous to get on to it at that level unless it was pretty well packed or you had some sort of load dispersing system so you wouldnt go straight down once you stepped out onto it ?

I guess we're used to snowflake snow, which doesn't last, but in ye old days I guess it would be there for months. We wouldn't last that long as a civilised society today?!

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6 minutes ago, leonardratso said:

surely with the snow that high it would dangerous to get on to it at that level unless it was pretty well packed or you had some sort of load dispersing system so you wouldnt go straight down once you stepped out onto it ?

That's what the low window is for, so you can tunnel your way back in...

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2 minutes ago, leonardratso said:

looks pretty well built for just an animal shelter, even as a barn it looks good and strong. What is it? did you not go up and have a nosey in thru the windows?

Barns were incredibly well built. Visited this one not long ago. Amazing building

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/bradford-on-avon-tithe-barn/history/

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6 minutes ago, Cunning Plan said:

More importantly, why were you walking the kids? Did you really want a dog?

And what kind of collar and lead do you use?

If we keep them locked up in the house they start chewing the furniture..

Leads are so last week.  Everyone uses WiFi/4G enabled smart child shock collars these days.

electrified-dog-collars-luxury-black-ant

 

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36 minutes ago, Libspero said:

So,  we were walking the kids this afternoon and saw this..

5_A6673_C7_C7_A5_48_DA_A678_A69700848_F9

Little door on the first floor that seemingly ejects any lost guests fumbling around for the bathroom directly from the premises.

You see this quite a lot on old buildings,  and I’m sure there’s a good reason for it.  I just don’t know what it is.

Any DOSBODs door experts able to enlighten us ?

Jeepers Creepers. Dont go a knockin

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31 minutes ago, One percent said:

I’m sure I’ve seen them on old buildings. I think as well as barns on buildings near quays and docks. This is America so apologies 

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/photocontest/detail/altered-images/storing-hay-the-old-fashioned-way-hay-being-lifted-from-a-tractor-pulled-wa/

Oh, I'm sure, pulleys were used, especially for specialist stuff.  But I don't recall ever seeing it done that way.  When I was little on my grandad's farm it was just trailer against wall and chuck the stuff up.  That was bales of hay -- the labourers* would easily chuck them over shoulder level.  I understand that before bales it was forked up, but that's way before my time.

[including dad and grandad, and me when I was older -- just to avoid jibes.  I doubt anyone* would do that now -- probably a H&S issue anyway]

[* Polish and probably other EE people would -- they're tough enough.  No locals though.]

Edited by dgul

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