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The Generation Game

Is the traditional British village show a dying breed?

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I'm sure most of you have probably been to one of the these in your lives.

My father is the chairman of the local village show (fruit, veg, baking, handicrafts, art and floral art, kid's section - handwriting, miniature garden, creative stuff - and photography etc.)

The entries for this year (on Saturday) are way down on previous years. Other than the summer killing all the crops, what are the reasons for this drop off?

Some thoughts from me:

1) Ageing population - usual suspects are no longer capable of entering or have passed on

2) Not enough interaction with local school to get kids involved

3) Transient population. People move away and incomers are unaware of show 

4) Lack of advertising 

5) Better things to do

6) Society changing and becoming less face-to-face interactive (maybe Thatcher was right)

7) Lack of growing space in modern gardens/allotments

On a personal note, I don't really care either (other than I'm being made to care). I've only been involved through the tradition of my father and grandfather. 

Does anyone have any ideas on this? Cultural change? Ways to reinvigorate it or is it a dead horse?

Cheers for all input

Edited by The Generation Game

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This village has quite a few activities going on throughout the year but they're largely kept going by half a dozen people out of a population of 560.

There is a fete every year, quite a big event. Quiz nights. Open garden days. Talks on wildlife.

When they pass I'm not convinced that anyone else will step in.

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15 minutes ago, The Generation Game said:

I'm sure most of you have probably been to one of the these in your lives.

My father is the chairman of the local village show (fruit, veg, baking, handicrafts, art and floral art, kid's section - handwriting, miniature garden, creative stuff - and photography etc.)

The entries for this year (on Saturday) are way down on previous years. Other than the summer killing all the crops, what are the reasons for this drop off?

Some thoughts from me:

1) Ageing population - usual suspects are no longer capable of entering or have passed on

2) Not enough interaction with local school to get kids involved

3) Transient population. People move away and incomers are unaware of show 

4) Lack of advertising 

5) Better things to do

6) Society changing and becoming less face-to-face interactive (maybe Thatcher was right)

7) Lack of growing space in modern gardens/allotments

On a personal note, I don't really care either (other than I'm being made to care). I've only been involved through the tradition of my father and grandfather. 

Does anyone have any ideas on this? Cultural change? Ways to reinvigorate it or is it a dead horse?

Cheers for all input

My parents used to be deeply involved in the village where they lived. The fete was quite big and well-attended. It was like Dibley all year round really, and a lot of newcomers got involved too, those kind of people looking for that kind of village moved there. But in many of the surrounding villages this wasn't true, they had become more like dormitories. A village of about 1000 people had a tennis club, a cricket team, a fairly well-attended (by modern standards) church, a couple of halls for parties/activities, 2 pubs, a shop/post-office and every Dibley character could be found there.

To my mind it depends on the existence of a small core of people in the village driving things, all year round not just at fete time, and usually the local vicar will be part of it, local businesses like pubs and hotels, or a shop/post-office if there is one will help out too as they know a lively village helps them. But if a few of the "core" people drop out, and no-one replaces them, it can die off quickly. And the "drivers" need to get at least minimum support from the less-involved locals, if they don't get any thanks or support they'll tend to drop out.

Sounds like that's happening in GGs_Dadville.

 

 

 

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18 minutes ago, The Generation Game said:

I'm sure most of you have probably been to one of the these in your lives.

My father is the chairman of the local village show (fruit, veg, baking, handicrafts, art and floral art, kid's section - handwriting, miniature garden, creative stuff - and photography etc.)

The entries for this year (on Saturday) are way down on previous years. Other than the summer killing all the crops, what are the reasons for this drop off?

Some thoughts from me:

1) Ageing population - usual suspects are no longer capable of entering or have passed on

2) Not enough interaction with local school to get kids involved

3) Transient population. People move away and incomers are unaware of show 

4) Lack of advertising 

5) Better things to do

6) Society changing and becoming less face-to-face interactive (maybe Thatcher was right)

7) Lack of growing space in modern gardens/allotments

On a personal note, I don't really care either (other than I'm being made to care). I've only been involved through the tradition of my father and grandfather. 

Does anyone have any ideas on this? Cultural change? Ways to reinvigorate it or is it a dead horse?

Cheers for all input

All of the above reasons are why the village show is dying. They’re still happening here but the photos in the local paper are all local older folk.

I always remember the year when my 12ish year old male cousin beat my late mother in the baking section with his scones and Victoria sponge. Mother made light of it but she was defined not amused! In hindsight she should have been pleased that she was a such good teacher resulting in her student doing exceptionally well.

The last time I put an entry in a village/town show was over 25 years ago (pre kids). I’ve got time now but haven’t bothered. Hmmmm, maybe I should. We should support it or lose it.

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10 minutes ago, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

My parents used to be deeply involved in the village where they lived. The fete was quite big and well-attended. It was like Dibley all year round really, and a lot of newcomers got involved too, those kind of people looking for that kind of village moved there. But in many of the surrounding villages this wasn't true, they had become more like dormitories. A village of about 1000 people had a tennis club, a cricket team, a fairly well-attended (by modern standards) church, a couple of halls for parties/activities, 2 pubs, a shop/post-office and every Dibley character could be found there.

To my mind it depends on the existence of a small core of people in the village driving things, all year round not just at fete time, and usually the local vicar will be part of it, local businesses like pubs and hotels, or a shop/post-office if there is one will help out too as they know a lively village helps them. But if a few of the "core" people drop out, and no-one replaces them, it can die off quickly. And the "drivers" need to get at least minimum support from the less-involved locals, if they don't get any thanks or support they'll tend to drop out.

Sounds like that's happening in GGs_Dadville.

 

 

 

Yep. It is that kind of village, although also a dormer for the local wealthy and footballers as well. The school is well rated and has grown exponentially since my day (meaning the catchment is much less localised).

I kind of think it's a dead duck but he's always asking people what kind of classes they'd like to see (as it's their show) but gets no response. 

Like the local football club, whether by design or accident, it has neglected its youth and thus will slowly die out. It's held in the church so that might put some off (and limits what can acceptably be held there - my brother and I talked about setting up a raspberry pic with old emulator games for a competition but doubt the church would allow it). 

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34 minutes ago, One percent said:

My mate who is an avid attendee of country shows was just mentioning this last week.  Her home village, Aislaby, the show has finished apparently. She blamed it on incomers and second homes. 

Aislaby is about ten miles from my house, although I have never heard of it and don't know that it isn't a village at all but merely a straggle of disparate houses spread out along a country lane.

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2 minutes ago, eight said:

Aislaby is about ten miles from my house, although I have never heard of it and don't know that it isn't a village at all but merely a straggle of disparate houses spread out along a country lane.

A clue?  Nearest Bigish town as I think there are a few villages with that name. 

Edited by One percent
Crapple

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26 minutes ago, DTMark said:

There is a fete every year, 

Is it worse than death?

Just now, One percent said:

A clue?  Nearest British town as I think there are a few villages with that name. 

The one I'm thinking of is between Darlington and Yarm, and would be right under the flighpath of Teesside Airport, if planes went there.

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3 minutes ago, eight said:

Is it worse than death?

The one I'm thinking of is between Darlington and Yarm, and would be right under the flighpath of Teesside Airport, if planes went there.

The one I’m talking about is just north of Whitby. About three miles out if that. 

We must arrange a dosbods meet for those in YORKSHIRE. xD

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We used to have a superb one every August bank holiday weekend in my local park. Huge cream tents were raised into which were placed lots of tables. 

Each tent was fruit, veg or flowers. There were competitions for the best in everything. I recall seeing the most amazing things. Huge leaks or onions that looked perfect. Minature gardens where entire allotments were recreated using minature fruit & vegs.

I can recall each tent being filled with wonderful scents. The light coming in through the tent flaps. The warmth of the tent canopy after the sun had been on them for hours.

Every year was packed.

Then sometime in the 90's someone in the Labour Council decided that the Brangwyn Ball was underused. So they moved it there. The atmosphere was awful. People hated. They tried again the following year but growers and public did not go.

That was that.

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3 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

We used to have a superb one every August bank holiday weekend in my local park. Huge cream tents were raised into which were placed lots of tables. 

Each tent was fruit, veg or flowers. There were competitions for the best in everything. I recall seeing the most amazing things. Huge leaks or onions that looked perfect. Minature gardens where entire allotments were recreated using minature fruit & vegs.

I can recall each tent being filled with wonderful scents. The light coming in through the tent flaps. The warmth of the tent canopy after the sun had been on them for hours.

Every year was packed.

Then sometime in the 90's someone in the Labour Council decided that the Brangwyn Ball was underused. So they moved it there. The atmosphere was awful. People hated. They tried again the following year but growers and public did not go.

That was that.

Lovely description of a village show and just how I remember the one in my town.

The place where the main show was held in my town was demolished in the New Labour reign and now has “posh” highly priced timber framed bungalows on it! It was a works social club with lots of space around it.

There hasn’t been a horticultural, baking etc show in my town for years but lots of other towns/villages are holding on. 

Going by photos it’s mainly over 50/60 people who are participating

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2 minutes ago, Van Lady said:

Lovely description of a village show and just how I remember the one in my town.

The place where the main show was held in my town was demolished in the New Labour reign and now has “posh” highly priced timber framed bungalows on it! It was a works social club with lots of space around it.

There hasn’t been a horticultural, baking etc show in my town for years but lots of other towns/villages are holding on. 

Going by photos it’s mainly over 50/60 people who are participating

Im convinced this stuff is deliberate. Identify where people meet and make sure it is eliminated. 

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It is all about getting the next-generation involved.

IMO they should liaise with the local school(s) to get kids to enter a few competitions.  Round here they go to the school and give out things like little packets of cress seeds or seed potatoes; if the kids don't want to get involved it is no great financial loss, but the kids will have a physical thing to act as incentive.

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41 minutes ago, eight said:

Is it worse than death?

The one I'm thinking of is between Darlington and Yarm, and would be right under the flighpath of Teesside Airport, if planes went there.

Theres 3. One in Ryedale too.

Its the old Viking word for '2nd place in baking. Cunts'.

Maybe the mega shows are sucking up the smallers ones?

Egtons getting big and the horsey stuff seems to mainly smoggies.

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Diversity and people being more suspicious of each other and who might turn up at that sort of event.  Whatever else you might think of it the Christian church did help to bind people together. 

Then there's a lot more competition for people's time.  People don't work such regular hours anymore and for work reasons lots of people are thrown all around the country to find work.  Maybe the kids aren't that interested either.  Traffic congestion and lack of parking in many areas is another factor.

Edited by twocents

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36 minutes ago, One percent said:

Im convinced this stuff is deliberate. Identify where people meet and make sure it is eliminated. 

 

The Swansea move was IMPO - many people said so at the time.

It cost money to put the show on in the park - not much though. Whilst the town hall down the road was underused and they wanted some grants to refurbish it. So they found a use for it. It holds these hideous Brangwyn Panels - works of Art - that were originally made for Parliament but Parliament had the good sense to reject them and gift them to the good people of Swansea. They now reside in this ugly awful Brangwyn Hall with no atmosphere, terrible lighting and they are treated as if they are some wonderful treasure.

So they hold the beer festival there... Um, that's it. Sometimes the Welsh National Opera turn up.

But moving the show there killed it stone dead. Something that happened for over a century was just finished off. Swansea is the poorer for it but, with each year that passes, there are less and less people who even recall it. Very sad.

But these things are happening in every town and city across the UK. British traditions and values being targeted, closed, destroyed and then replaced.

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2 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

 

The Swansea move was IMPO - many people said so at the time.

It cost money to put the show on in the park - not much though. Whilst the town hall down the road was underused and they wanted some grants to refurbish it. So they found a use for it. It holds these hideous Brangwyn Panels - works of Art - that were originally made for Parliament but Parliament had the good sense to reject them and gift them to the good people of Swansea. They now reside in this ugly awful Brangwyn Hall with no atmosphere, terrible lighting and they are treated as if they are some wonderful treasure.

So they hold the beer festival there... Um, that's it. Sometimes the Welsh National Opera turn up.

But moving the show there killed it stone dead. Something that happened for over a century was just finished off. Swansea is the poorer for it but, with each year that passes, there are less and less people who even recall it. Very sad.

But these things are happening in every town and city across the UK. British traditions and values being targeted, closed, destroyed and then replaced.

My home town has a regatta. Mainly a rowing regatta with rowing races at sea. It’s been going for over 150 years.it was always run by townspeople giving their time for free. In the last few years, some incomers took it over, turned it into a limited company so that they could take a wage from it. 

I went this year. It was a shadow of its former self. Tragic. The whole town came together for this event. I saw one local person I knew. Criminal. 

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4 minutes ago, One percent said:

My home town has a regatta. Mainly a rowing regatta with rowing races at sea. It’s been going for over 150 years.it was always run by townspeople giving their time for free. In the last few years, some incomers took it over, turned it into a limited company so that they could take a wage from it. 

I went this year. It was a shadow of its former self. Tragic. The whole town came together for this event. I saw one local person I knew. Criminal. 

 

That is awful.

All across the UK I think there are asset-strippers stripping our every way of life - forever - for their own financial gain.

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4 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

 

That is awful.

All across the UK I think there are asset-strippers stripping our every way of life - forever - for their own financial gain.

The person leading this asset stripping had never done an honest day’s work afaict. Some locals went on a mission to out the person and dug up, allegedly, quite a lot of dodgy shenanigans.  Allegedly. .    

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