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One percent

Yet another adulteration of the food chain

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-45371852

More than a fifth of meat sample tests in 2017 found DNA from animals not on the labelling, the So-Called BBC has learned.

Out of 665 results from England, Wales and Northern Ireland collected by the Food Standards Agency, 145 were partly or wholly made up of unspecified meat.

The FSA said the levels were consistent with "deliberate inclusion" - but added testing had targeted those businesses suspected of "compliance issues". 

The samples came from 487 businesses, including restaurants and supermarkets. 

A BBC Freedom of Information request to the FSA revealed that in total 73 of the contaminated samples came from retailers - including three supermarkets. A further 50 came from restaurants, while 22 originated from manufacturing or food processing plants. 

It also showed:

  • Some samples contained DNA from as many as four different animals, while others contained no trace of the meat that appeared on the product's label
  • Meat labelled as lamb was most likely to contain traces of other animals' DNA, followed by beef and goat
  • Cow DNA was the most commonly found contaminate, followed by pig, chicken, sheep and turkey
  • The most commonly mis-labelled product was mince meat, while sausages, kebabs and restaurant curries also featured prominently 
  • Other products in the dataset include ready meals such as spaghetti Bolognese and curries, pizzas and a portion of ostrich meat, which contained only beef

 

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1 minute ago, Roger_Mellie said:

It's a good thing. Puts a bit of variety into the carnivore diet. 

Unless your belief system does not allow you to eat certain animals.  I wonde4 what the strange DNA was?  It doesn’t go into much detail apart from someone pass8ng beef off as ostrich. 

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13 minutes ago, One percent said:

Unless your belief system does not allow you to eat certain animals.  I wonde4 what the strange DNA was?  It doesn’t go into much detail apart from someone pass8ng beef off as ostrich. 

Cross contaminatiom with Pork would be interesting. Allah doesn't appear to be a forgiving soul on this point.

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2 minutes ago, Roger_Mellie said:

Cross contaminatiom with Pork would be interesting. Allah doesn't appear to be a forgiving soul on this point.

This was just 'average meat' that had been tested -- Perhaps anything labelled as halal (etc) will be more likely to be clean?

And perhaps the non-label meat isn't the problem -- the added meat might not have been killed or prayed properly (which would be dreadful).  I presume all that is tested by sprinkling special magic dust or something, but they're not giving us those results.

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It won't just be 'meat', I suspect that a lot of seafood, especially fish is miss-labeled, for example fish labelled as cod or haddock (or similar premium white fish), especially in some fast food Take-Aways, will be pangasius/river cobbler/basa, or if you are more lucky, pollock.

I wouldn't touch pangasius, not even with a very long barge pole

Edited by Hopeful

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1 minute ago, SpectrumFX said:

Just lable it all as "meat".

Problem solved.

xD

I went to Prague in the mid 90s, and the menus mostly were written as: “meat” and then some specific vegetables.

My girlfriend of the time would ask “What kind of meat is it, beef, ham, chicken?”

And they would reply in a slightly offended tone: “It is real meat! Not fake meat!” To this day I have no idea what they thought she was really questioning.

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5 minutes ago, SpectrumFX said:

Just lable it all as "meat".

Problem solved.

xD

When I worked at an eastern block site a bloke asked me what was the meat that was served in the canteen. I told him it depended on the day of the week, Monday the cook called it lamb, Tuesday beef, Wednesday pork etc. Actually it was mostly horse as that's what the locals ate.

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2 hours ago, Bkkandrew said:

I know we are all hoping it will be other meats contaminated with pork, but kebab meat is likely contaminated with human meat. 

 

 

Samples contaminated by un-named DNA at a level of less than 1% were excluded from the results on the basis they could have been caused by poor hygiene.

 

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1 minute ago, sarahbell said:

 

Samples contaminated by un-named DNA at a level of less than 1% were excluded from the results on the basis they could have been caused by poor hygiene.

 

Breakfast cereals are limited by parts per million as to how much: insect bits, rodent hair, and shit they can contain. 

All that goodness in every bite!

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10 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

 

Samples contaminated by un-named DNA at a level of less than 1% were excluded from the results on the basis they could have been caused by poor hygiene.

 

 We have to be careful in interpreting comments like this.

I am confident that I could find human DNA in any meal I eat at any restaurant, however posh - it will come from skin cells from placing the food or handling the plate, form saliva droplets (a cough) or a wipe of a brow in a hot kitchen.

Any production line that handles different meats will cross contaminate DNA. Ironically, the cleaner and drier an environment the more DNA is persistent. DNA hates wet, bacterial ridden conditions.

The techniques to 'find' DNA are incredibly sensitive, they can detect just a few molecules. So the key is the % composition. Trace amounts of 'contamination' wouldn't worry me as it would be silly to expect them not to be there.

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2 minutes ago, Hail the Tripod said:

Breakfast cereals are limited by parts per million as to how much: insect bits, rodent hair, and shit they can contain. 

All that goodness in every bite!

It's good for you.
 

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7 hours ago, Hopeful said:

 We have to be careful in interpreting comments like this.

I am confident that I could find human DNA in any meal I eat at any restaurant, however posh - it will come from skin cells from placing the food or handling the plate, form saliva droplets (a cough) or a wipe of a brow in a hot kitchen.

Any production line that handles different meats will cross contaminate DNA. Ironically, the cleaner and drier an environment the more DNA is persistent. DNA hates wet, bacterial ridden conditions.

The techniques to 'find' DNA are incredibly sensitive, they can detect just a few molecules. So the key is the % composition. Trace amounts of 'contamination' wouldn't worry me as it would be silly to expect them not to be there.

Re. your last paragraph. When I worked for the constabulary if the crime wasn't deemed serious (i.e. car break-in during the night) forensics would bother going out if it had rained. The learning from this is to carry out all misdemeanours whilst it's raining.

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4 minutes ago, longtomsilver said:

Re. your last paragraph. When I worked for the constabulary if the crime wasn't deemed serious (i.e. car break-in during the night) forensics would bother going out if it had rained. The learning from this is to carry out all misdemeanours whilst it's raining.

or eat your stinking kebab in the rain.

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1 hour ago, eight said:

And yet mine somehow survived Mrs. Eight's rancid box.

But it was protected from complete contact with her throughout it's epic journey, and, in the end, it only ever connected with 50% of her

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49 minutes ago, longtomsilver said:

Re. your last paragraph. When I worked for the constabulary if the crime wasn't deemed serious (i.e. car break-in during the night) forensics would bother going out if it had rained. The learning from this is to carry out all misdemeanours whilst it's raining.

I think the key word is serious, I'm sure that the effort would be made if it was serious as I would still hope to find DNA evidence even if it had rained. The worse thing for DNA is biological degradation by DNase enzymes (we produce them, bacteria produce them - they are a defense mechanism) and enzymes require a wet environment. Keep DNA dry and it is very robust even at high temperatures. It has to be a robust molecule given where it can be found.

Edited by Hopeful

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