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Online Privacy - Apple

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WTF??

Apple's Mysterious New 'Trust Score' For iPhone Users Leaves Many Unanswered Questions

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Like Facebook (and the Chinese Communist Party) before it, Apple is now assigning users of its products a "trust" score that is based on users' call and email habits, the Sun reports. The new ratings were added as part of the latest iOS 12 update, as VentureBeat explains.

Apple’s promise of transparency regarding user data means that any new privacy policy update might reveal that it’s doing something new and weird with your data.

[...]

Alongside yesterday’s releases of iOS 12, tvOS 12, and watchOS 5, Apple quietly updated some of its iTunes Store terms and privacy disclosures, including one standout provision: It’s now using an abstracted summary of your phone calls or emails as an anti-fraud measure.

I am no Apple Fanboi and use an Android Phone. I am under no illusion that Google doesn't, or won't be, doing the same thing with Android.

If Apple aren't disclosing the data to third parties, how will they themselves be using this data?

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Customer profiling, this has been going on before mobile phones.  I have no doubt many other big companies can do this stuff by the use of loyalty cards, credit/debt cards and mobile phone signatures.

I guess the Trust score can be linked to your Credit score, and maybe used by banks and insurance companies to measure your risk.

In the market, people trade risk. The more information you have, the more you can measure the risk. And risk is linked to reward.

It's dem alogrithms again!

Edited by 201p

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And what if a user wants to review their trust score? Well, that's too bad, because Apple will refuse to disclose it, even if federal investigators demand it.

Surely under GDPR,  Apple have to disclose any information they store about an individual upon request? 

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2 minutes ago, MvR said:

Surely under GDPR,  Apple have to disclose any information they store about an individual upon request? 

That's my understanding.

I suppose that even if they did release an individual's score, without an explanation of the scoring system it would be meaningless.

Is a high number good or bad? Is it just a number, or a code with different digits meaning different things?

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One Apple device out of this household already, more to follow. Some of their product range is good and some features are good - the magsafe connector for example but as they drop the good features and charge even more for increasingly unserviceable products will not be buying any more.

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The problem is so much of this data that is collected, like loyalty card data, has this high marketing value placed on it but it's largely imaginary.

Clearly Google does use phone tracking data for sat nav on Google Maps as it takes you down all sorts of convoluted local rat runs, they've obviously uncovered, that you would never have found yourself but I can't see much of this data has any real commercial value. It does seem a lot of those who get worked up about it are deluding themselves their data is 'special' and they're not going to let anyone get their hands on it when the truth is their calls and texts are all 'what do fancy for dinner tonight' and the tracking is them shuttling between the kids' school, work and the supermarket like millions and millions of other drones.

Edit to add: I guess I superficially don't like the idea of them say assessing you're potentially a heavy drink or drug user and then consequently, unbeknownst to you, your insurance premiums are adjusted accordingly. On the flip side of that though as someone who isn't a heavy drinker or drug user do I really want to subsidise the insurance premiums of those who are.

 

 

Edited by SNACR

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1 hour ago, onlyme said:

One Apple device out of this household already, more to follow. Some of their product range is good and some features are good - the magsafe connector for example but as they drop the good features and charge even more for increasingly unserviceable products will not be buying any more.

I'm pretty disappointed with my apple company phone.

Yes,  it's slightly old now being an iphone 6,   but the battery life is shockingly poor after 3 years use and is already starting to exhibit that laggy loading between apps that you get on old phones.

Having had a good experience with my latest android tablet I'm very tempted to go down that route for my next phone.

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1 hour ago, SNACR said:

Clearly Google does use phone tracking data for sat nav on Google Maps as it takes you down all sorts of convoluted local rat runs

Sometimes Google is surprising like that, sometimes it goes the other way. They still don't know the most direct road to my house and insist on some large 2km detour.

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1 hour ago, SNACR said:

Edit to add: I guess I superficially don't like the idea of them say assessing you're potentially a heavy drink or drug user and then consequently, unbeknownst to you, your insurance premiums are adjusted accordingly. On the flip side of that though as someone who isn't a heavy drinker or drug user do I really want to subsidise the insurance premiums of those who are.

Individual risk is an odd concept to me when it comes to insurance.

The whole point of insurance is to split the risk of an event between everyone potentially effected by it so the over all cost is manageable.

The alternative being every one just pays for their own cancer treatment or heart surgery if they are unfortunate enough to need it.

If insurers get good enough at assessing personal risk that they can know in advance who is going to suffer a given fate to a high degree of certainty,  then you end up with people who need heart surgery paying for their own heart sugery (plus middle man's fee) because their premium is so high or they are simply uninsurable,  and those with no risk effectively just paying thd middle man's fee.

Edited by Libspero

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55 minutes ago, Libspero said:

I'm pretty disappointed with my apple company phone.

Yes,  it's slightly old now being an iphone 6,   but the battery life is shockingly poor after 3 years use and is already starting to exhibit that laggy loading between apps that you get on old phones.

Having had a good experience with my latest android tablet I'm very tempted to go down that route for my next phone.

I'm not an apple user, but I thought the new IOS had made all the older ones, back to six, much faster? 

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1 minute ago, Uptherebels said:

I'm not an apple user, but I thought the new IOS had made all the older ones, back to six, much faster? 

Certainly not mine.  Probably cancelled out by some security patch or other that screws everything up.

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46 minutes ago, Libspero said:

Certainly not mine.  Probably cancelled out by some security patch or other that screws everything up.

Planned obsolescence through patches. My Samsung s5 was pretty much unusable after about 18 months as it was so laggy and terrible battery performance. I ended up putting LinageOS on it and the phone was like brand new again. Fantastic performance all round. At this rate, I will get at least five years out of this phone.

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1 hour ago, Libspero said:

Yes,  it's slightly old now being an iphone 6,   but the battery life is shockingly poor after 3 years use and is already starting to exhibit that laggy loading between apps that you get on old phones.

Apple throttle the phone to improve battery life once the battery starts wearing out. They got a lot of stick for this, so offered a pretty good battery replacement deal on that model. Take it to an Apple store or service centre, and they'll replace the battery for £35 ish.  ( normally around £80 I think).  If you can take it to one of the major stores, they can do it on-site in a few hours.  It'll be nice and fast again once this is done.

Edited by MvR

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1 hour ago, Dave Bloke said:

Sometimes Google is surprising like that, sometimes it goes the other way. They still don't know the most direct road to my house and insist on some large 2km detour.

I've found that it prioritises shortest journey time and if a longer detour is quicker then it chooses that. It also has an element of randomness - if it detects traffic ahead then it sends you on a detour, but if it chose the same detour for everyone then it would just cause a different traffic problem.

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8 minutes ago, Funn3r said:

I've found that it prioritises shortest journey time and if a longer detour is quicker then it chooses that. It also has an element of randomness - if it detects traffic ahead then it sends you on a detour, but if it chose the same detour for everyone then it would just cause a different traffic problem.

Not in this case, the 2km detour is 5 minutes longer and never a car on either road. Seems to be a bug. If I actually drive on the road Google doesn't like it will then route from there, so it knows the road exists plus it must have detected me driving up it.

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