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Melchett

The dry and mould free dehumidifier thread

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Post your tales of mouldy rooms and gallons of water extraction here, to keep other threads nicely on topic and dehumidified.

I haven’t turned mine on yet this winter. Have you? Its still warm enough to open the window instead.

Edited by Melchett

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5 minutes ago, Melchett said:

Post your tales of mouldy rooms and gallons of water extraction here, to keep other threads nicely on topic and dehumidified.

I haven’t turned mine on yet this winter. Have you? Its still warm enough to open the window instead.

At the moment, outside is wetter than inside.

But I'm quite worried about energy bills post Brexit re running a dehumidifier 24/7.

I'm not sure that UKIPs policy to bring back coal fields is the right answer to our eergy needs, however. Will the ensuing additional global warming reduce or exacerbate the problem of humidity ? It will all depend upon what happens to the AMOC as the oceans warm.

Edited by Hopeful

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And without any discussion from me about this, my wife has just turned the upstairs on on for the first time this winter. o.O

OK, own up, which one of you am I married to? :S 

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2 minutes ago, Melchett said:

And without any discussion from me about this, my wife has just turned the upstairs on on for the first time this winter. o.O

OK, own up, which one of you am I married to? :S 

So you have more than one ?

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12 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

At the moment, outside is wetter than inside.

But I'm quite worried about energy bills post Brexit re running a dehumidifier 24/7.

I'm not sure that UKIPs policy to bring back coal fields is the right answer to our eergy needs, however. Will the ensuing additional global warming reduce or exacerbate the problem of humidity ? It will all depend upon what happens to the AMOC as the oceans warm.

Blame the Germans :D ,as they closed most of  their nuclear plants and have built two of the largest coal fired power stations in the world

Anyway the answer to the op is ventilation  

Edited by Long time lurking

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I turned mine on for a couple of days last week as the humidity had gone above 80%.  I only run it during the day, partly because it's free as I have solar panels and partly because if I run it through the night I have a very dry mouth on the morning which makes me prone to coughs.

I have it in the side of the house without big south facing windows as the lack of solar gain means that it is colder than the rest of the house so the damp from the other rooms with the big windows accumulates there.

It's also very handy combined with the heating on for drying clothes indoors in winter.  In the summer I dry them in the front porch which doesn't contain the front door so isn't inconvenient.

Prior to getting it as recommended on here I was putting the heating on to clear the damp which is a much more wasteful way of dealing with it and was making the house too hot in winter.

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1 minute ago, Hopeful said:

So you have more than one ?

I’m a flash git.

Although keeping them apart is tricky. Like Ghostbusters, never cross the streams. Or, more obscurely, like in the Farscape episode on the ruined command carrier, never allow the energy panel things to touch. It’s best that each doesn’t know about the other at all.

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13 minutes ago, Long time lurking said:

 

Anyway the answer to the op is ventilation  

 

So they say. But to achieve sufficient ventilation would make the house match the ambient outside ˚C, as the house would have to be open. Even though the house is leaky, it still requires to run a dehiumidifier and then, with heating, I can keep the inside a couple of ˚C above ambient, which does make a slight difference when the outside is around 12˚C. The 2˚C difference it makes upon morale disappears below that however xD and then the GF wears even more jumpers. Although I do survive the year in shorts.

 

Edited by Hopeful

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11 minutes ago, Long time lurking said:

Blame the Germans :D ,as they closed most of  their nuclear plants and have built two of the largest coal fired power stations in the world

Anyway the answer to the op is ventilation  

Ventilation isn't good enough for mine.  Cornwall is fairly damp anyway and add in being by the sea and cut into the side of a steep hill* and its natural winter humidity is over 80%; a colleague's house is up against a cliff and is 90% plus.

* In my cycle / wood store which is off my workshop there is a massive exposed lump of the ground rock.

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I use a head-recovery ventilation thing.  It is in the loft and I don't really notice it is there, apart from air wafting through the vents.

I'd guess the point about 'damp Cornwall' is that RH is temperature dependent, so that the damp air outside, once warmed, becomes relatively dryer air inside, without actually being dried.

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4 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Ventilation isn't good enough for mine.  Cornwall is fairly damp anyway and add in being by the sea and cut into the side of a steep hill* and its natural winter humidity is over 80%; a colleague's house is up against a cliff and is 90% plus.

* In my cycle / wood store which is off my workshop there is a massive exposed lump of the ground rock.

You have a wood burner ? that could well be your problem if it has not got a balanced flue 

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IMHO, a dehumidifier is essential in the UK if you dry clothes inside over the colder months. When I dry clothes on the radiator I run the dehumidifier and it does make the clothes dry quicker.

Its a win win situation. Less energy to dry clothes and less mould on Windows.

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1 minute ago, Frank Hovis said:

No, though I see it read that way.

Long planks of wood / trim.

Gas central heating without out a balanced flue can cause the same problem ,but less dramatic as  the combustion air comes from inside the house so it must be replaced with damp air from outside opposed to balance flues which take there combustion air from outside 

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1 minute ago, Long time lurking said:

Gas central heating without out a balanced flue can cause the same problem ,but less dramatic as  the combustion air comes from inside the house so it must be replaced with damp air from outside opposed to balance flues which take there combustion air from outside 

I don't know but will lay money that my ancient gas central heating doesn't have such witchcraft.

I'm assuming it hasn't got long to go at which point I'll get rid of it and replace it with storage heaters.  I doubt the panels will be enough for them in winter but they will make it cheaper and I will avoid the usual issue people have with these by charging them in the day to release in the evening.

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10 minutes ago, Great Guy said:

IMHO, a dehumidifier is essential in the UK if you dry clothes inside over the colder months. When I dry clothes on the radiator I run the dehumidifier and it does make the clothes dry quicker.

Its a win win situation. Less energy to dry clothes and less mould on Windows.

We dry clothes in the spare room, don't generally bother with the radiator and just use a big airier and the dehumidifier, works a treat.

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I find that even on a wet day an open window makes all the difference in drying out somewhere like a recently used bathroom or kitchen.

Edited by Panther

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31 minutes ago, Panther said:

I find that even on a wet day an open window makes all the difference in drying out somewhere like a recently used bathroom or kitchen.

Ahh, but that is momentarily generated steam, not intrinsic damp air. So yes, bathroom window open while having a shower/bath and extractor hood on above cooker, but bathroom and kitchen doors closed to stop too much damp air permeating the rest of the house where the dehunidifier is doing battle.

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3 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

Ventilation isn't good enough for mine.  Cornwall is fairly damp anyway and add in being by the sea and cut into the side of a steep hill* and its natural winter humidity is over 80%; a colleague's house is up against a cliff and is 90% plus.

* In my cycle / wood store which is off my workshop there is a massive exposed lump of the ground rock.

You need ventilation to get rid of the radon. 

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I got one of these about 4 years ago.

https://www.wilko.com/en-uk/unibond-aero-360-moisture-absorber-450g/p/0286745

Spurred on by this thread I'm going to buy a refill today. Last one ran out about 3 1/2 years ago.

Never used to have a black mould problem until I had the double glazing replaced and got cavity wall insulation. Now we get quite a bit in 2 bedrooms but at least our gas usage fell about 30% and the house doesn't feel stupidly cold all the time in winter.

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3 hours ago, Melchett said:

Post your tales of mouldy rooms and gallons of water extraction here, to keep other threads nicely on topic and dehumidified.

I haven’t turned mine on yet this winter. Have you? Its still warm enough to open the window instead.

I miss many things about the UK but the perpetually damp air isn't one of them. Other than on very rare occasions, a humidifier is the order of the day here in Toronto.

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6 minutes ago, blobloblob said:

I got one of these about 4 years ago.

https://www.wilko.com/en-uk/unibond-aero-360-moisture-absorber-450g/p/0286745

Spurred on by this thread I'm going to buy a refill today. Last one ran out about 3 1/2 years ago.

Never used to have a black mould problem until I had the double glazing replaced and got cavity wall insulation. Now we get quite a bit in 2 bedrooms but at least our gas usage fell about 30% and the house doesn't feel stupidly cold all the time in winter.

Honestly, if you have a mould problem get a proper dehumidier. A dehumidifier is probably a lot cheaper than redecorating every few years....

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