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Frank Hovis

10,000 days, 20,000 days

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Without whipping out my calculator I think 30,000 days (81 something) is a good innings so I celebrated my 10,000 (27 years and something) and am considering making my 19,999th day my last day working.

Does anybody else celebrate these?  I picked it up from a college mate and they are really good markers in your life.  So 5,000 days is spent in childhood / infancy then next 5,000 is about celebrating being young / starting a career / becoming an adult etc.  The way it blocks period of your life helps you to focus upon them; e.g. I expect / hope 20,000 - 25,000 (54- 67) to be my last block of 5,000 without physical limitations so will make sure that I make the most of it.

I also like that by reflecting these then are valuing each individual day rather than letting them slip and just focussing upon years.

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I got a snap of my car dashboard yesterday 175000 miles does that count? Not even properly run in yet.

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Just now, Funn3r said:

I got a snap of my car dashboard yesterday 175000 miles does that count? Not even properly run in yet.

Impressed; I'm at 153,000 but definitely want 200,000 to tick up.

1 minute ago, Happy Renting said:

You quoted me before I corrected my typos.

You fucking fucking bastard.

Oh no I didn't!

;)

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3 minutes ago, Funn3r said:

I got a snap of my car dashboard yesterday 175000 miles does that count? Not even properly run in yet.

 

2 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Impressed; I'm at 153,000 but definitely want 200,000 to tick up.

99,000 miles (taken 3 weeks ago).

I'm now at 99,420 miles.

 

miles.jpg

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2 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Impressed; I'm at 153,000 but definitely want 200,000 to tick up.

I try and get a photo every 25000 miles it is incredibly stressful. I drive along grim-faced clutching the steering wheel as it gets close in case I miss it. Then when it gets to nnn998 I start panicking looking for a place to stop that is not too close and not too far. Don't know why I do it, pointless, wondering if I got OCD.

I never thought about measuring blocks of my life in days. It is not a bad idea actually. I am pretty good at remembering dates and I often think OK it's exactly 10 years ago today that I (did something personally significant.)

2 minutes ago, UmBongo said:

 

99,000 miles (taken 3 weeks ago).

I'm now at 99,420 miles.

Well Nissan you have got an advantage there should go on for ever.

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11 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Without whipping out my calculator I think 30,000 days (81 something) is a good innings so I celebrated my 10,000 (27 years and something) and am considering making my 19,999th day my last day working.

Does anybody else celebrate these?  I picked it up from a college mate and they are really good markers in your life.  So 5,000 days is spent in childhood / infancy then next 5,000 is about celebrating being young / starting a career / becoming an adult etc.  The way it blocks period of your life helps you to focus upon them; e.g. I expect / hope 20,000 - 25,000 (54- 67) to be my last block of 5,000 without physical limitations so will make sure that I make the most of it.

I also like that by reflecting these then are valuing each individual day rather than letting them slip and just focussing upon years.

I've never thought of things that way but I like the concept.

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Just enjoy the fact that there is no point to life - it always helps me put things in perspective. It's pretty pointless putting unnecessary pressure/markers on yourself that you must always be achieving something. Write a symphony or a book if you must or do sweet FA - it's all good. 

I always enjoyed this quote by Biblical actor Victor Mature: "I was never that crazy about acting. I had a compulsion to earn money, not to act. So, I worked as an actor until I could afford to retire. I wanted to quit while I could still enjoy life... I like to loaf. Everyone told me I would go crazy or die if I quit working. Yeah? Well, what a lovely way to die. I'm not an actor — and I've got 64 films to prove it!"

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10 hours ago, maynardgravy said:

Just enjoy the fact that there is no point to life - it always helps me put things in perspective. It's pretty pointless putting unnecessary pressure/markers on yourself that you must always be achieving something. Write a symphony or a book if you must or do sweet FA - it's all good. 

I always enjoyed this quote by Biblical actor Victor Mature: "I was never that crazy about acting. I had a compulsion to earn money, not to act. So, I worked as an actor until I could afford to retire. I wanted to quit while I could still enjoy life... I like to loaf. Everyone told me I would go crazy or die if I quit working. Yeah? Well, what a lovely way to die. I'm not an actor — and I've got 64 films to prove it!"

I see it less as pressure than as possibility.

A little over thirteen and half years (5,000 days) is a timescale in which you can do some amazing things from a base of zero; one year is nowhere near enough for most things.  Think of all the things that you did from thirteen and a half to twenty seven.  It doesn't have to be one thing but I, like many, have a whole list of things that I'd like to do including, to take a less ambitious example, play in the town band despite the last time I played being in the school band.

I'm not comfortable with doing sweet FA because it feels, to me, like waiting for something and the things that are guaranteed to come along as you get older aren't IMO worth waiting for.

A family friend always knew that he was going to inherit a lot of money from his mother (which took decades because of the various tax evasions she had going on) so spent his life waiting for that, his only gainful employment being taking the money in summer in a car park that she had given him, and now with the money in the bank (eventually received in his sixties) drinks, according to his wife, four bottles of wine a night and gets up mid afternoon.  Yes he's probably very happy with that but he's still giving me the impression that waiting for something has become such an ingrained part of him that despite having received the inheritance for which he spent his life waiting he continues to wait. 

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13 hours ago, UmBongo said:

 

99,000 miles (taken 3 weeks ago).

I'm now at 99,420 miles.

I've only ever had one into six figures (the second Fiat Tipo) but it was very exciting when it happened.

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11 hours ago, maynardgravy said:

Just enjoy the fact that there is no point to life - it always helps me put things in perspective. It's pretty pointless putting unnecessary pressure/markers on yourself that you must always be achieving something. Write a symphony or a book if you must or do sweet FA - it's all good. 

I always enjoyed this quote by Biblical actor Victor Mature: "I was never that crazy about acting. I had a compulsion to earn money, not to act. So, I worked as an actor until I could afford to retire. I wanted to quit while I could still enjoy life... I like to loaf. Everyone told me I would go crazy or die if I quit working. Yeah? Well, what a lovely way to die. I'm not an actor — and I've got 64 films to prove it!"

Bang on! Than's a very considered approach to life. You are Albert Camus and I claim my £5.

Speaking of Hollywood actors, I believe Bob Mitchum and Elisha Cook Jr. also took a similar approach to "the profession" (to name but two)

Edited by Turned Out Nice Again

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46 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

 

A family friend always knew that he was going to inherit a lot of money from his mother (which took decades because of the various tax evasions she had going on) so spent his life waiting for that, his only gainful employment being taking the money in summer in a car park that she had given him, and now with the money in the bank (eventually received in his sixties) drinks, according to his wife, four bottles of wine a night and gets up mid afternoon.  Yes he's probably very happy with that but he's still giving me the impression that waiting for something has become such an ingrained part of him that despite having received the inheritance for which he spent his life waiting he continues to wait. 

Is your friend Prince Charles?

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1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

I see it less as pressure than as possibility.

A little over thirteen and half years (5,000 days) is a timescale in which you can do some amazing things from a base of zero; one year is nowhere near enough for most things.  Think of all the things that you did from thirteen and a half to twenty seven.  It doesn't have to be one thing but I, like many, have a whole list of things that I'd like to do including, to take a less ambitious example, play in the town band despite the last time I played being in the school band.

I'm not comfortable with doing sweet FA because it feels, to me, like waiting for something and the things that are guaranteed to come along as you get older aren't IMO worth waiting for.

A family friend always knew that he was going to inherit a lot of money from his mother (which took decades because of the various tax evasions she had going on) so spent his life waiting for that, his only gainful employment being taking the money in summer in a car park that she had given him, and now with the money in the bank (eventually received in his sixties) drinks, according to his wife, four bottles of wine a night and gets up mid afternoon.  Yes he's probably very happy with that but he's still giving me the impression that waiting for something has become such an ingrained part of him that despite having received the inheritance for which he spent his life waiting he continues to wait. 

I'm not advocating doing nothing. Just saying that different things suit different people at different times. Our protestant work ethic has programmed us to believe that relaxing is some kind of sin. My personal approach is to do a few weeks of very little, fobbing others off with excuses and then throwing myself into work with a passion (once wrote a concerto in three weeks). Depends on my mood, though I'm often compromised by deadlines.

There are too many people clock-watching, eating lunch at their desks and sitting there until the clock reaches a certain time, regardless of how productive they are being (or not). Nothing a few weeks in Italy having long lunches won't cure.

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2 minutes ago, maynardgravy said:

I'm not advocating doing nothing. Just saying that different things suit different people at different times. Our protestant work ethic has programmed us to believe that relaxing is some kind of sin. My personal approach is to do a few weeks of very little, fobbing others off with excuses and then throwing myself into work with a passion (once wrote a concerto in three weeks). Depends on my mood, though I'm often compromised by deadlines.

There are too many people clock-watching, eating lunch at their desks and sitting there until the clock reaches a certain time, regardless of how productive they are being (or not). Nothing a few weeks in Italy having long lunches won't cure.

You sound similar to me.  I can work at top speed for ten hours straight and pretty much do a week's work in a long day if I work through lunch that is.

Knowing that I can do this means that I rely upon it maybe too often and spend Monday to Wednesday doing not very much and then kick it off on Thursday.  Most people with whom I've worked, though there are exceptions, don't have this top gear so have to work away steadily each day.

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1 hour ago, Turned Out Nice Again said:

Bang on! Than's a very considered approach to life. You are Albert Camus and I claim my £5.

Speaking of Hollywood actors, I believe Bob Mitchum and Elisha Cook Jr. also took a similar approach to "the profession" (to name but two)

I'm ashamed to say that I had to search him, and I consider myself fairly well informed. Interesting guy - will have a poke around about his work. Thanks for the tip off.

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10 hours ago, eight said:

I've only ever had one into six figures (the second Fiat Tipo) but it was very exciting when it happened.

I had a Fiat Tempra (booted Tipo) which was a money pit but I liked it. Got it up to 92,000 miles before I crashed it. The only car I had with over 100k was my previous heap: a 16 year old ex police Ford Escort 1.8 LD that had 152,000 miles before I traded it in for my current Nissan. For £362.50 (inc 6 months VED) it was a bloody good car.

23 hours ago, Funn3r said:

Well Nissan you have got an advantage there should go on for ever.

I found out that the diesel engine in mine is Nissan's own unit and not a Renault one so it certainly has a chance of another 99,000 miles. My car was built after the alliance between Renault and Nissan.

Logging high mileages is a subject of mass debate here:

Autoshite High Mileage club

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3 minutes ago, UmBongo said:

I had a Fiat Tempra (booted Tipo) which was a money pit but I liked it. Got it up to 92,000 miles before I crashed it. The only car I had with over 100k was my previous heap: a 16 year old ex police Ford Escort 1.8 LD that had 152,000 miles before I traded it in for my current Nissan. For £362.50 (inc 6 months VED) it was a bloody good car.

I found out that the diesel engine in mine is Nissan's own unit and not a Renault one so it certainly has a chance of another 99,000 miles. My car was built after the alliance between Renault and Nissan.

Logging high mileages is a subject of mass debate here:

Autoshite High Mileage club

I'm on three forums and that's plenty but if I was going to join a fourth it would definitely be Autoshite.  I read it from time to time.

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