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PeptoAbysmal

Party Manifestoes

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Given that there is a possibility of a general election that will follow the Brexit shambles.

I thought I would investigate some of the party manifestoes (https://labour.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/labour-manifesto-2017.pdf).

Here is Labour's (specifically the bits on spending, the section on Brexit is so vague as to be as meaningless as Treason May):

Quote

- We will take advantage of near record low interest rates to create a National Transformation Fund  that will invest £250 billion over ten years in upgrading our economy (that's 25 billion per year extra).

- Ensure that 60 per cent of the 8.’s energy comes from zero-carbon or renewable sources by 2030.

- Introduce an immediate emergency price cap to ensure that the average dual-fuel household energy bill remains below £1,000 per year, while we transition to a fairer system for bill payers.

- Take energy back into public ownership to deliver renewable energy, affordability for consumers, and democratic control.

- To give all children the best start in life, we will reduce class sizes to less than 30 for all five, six, and seven-year-olds, and seek to extend that as resources allow. To aid attainment, we will introduce free school meals for all primary school children.

- Overhaul the existing childcare system in which subsidies are given directly to parents who often struggle to use them, and transition to a system of high-quality childcare places in mixed environments with direct government subsidy.

-Maintain current commitments on free hours and make significant capital investment during our first two years of government, to ensure that the places exist to meet demand.
 
- Phase in subsidised provision on top of free-hour entitlements, to ensure that everyone has access to affordable childcare, no matter their working pattern.

- Transition to a qualified, graduate-led workforce, by increasing staff wages and enhancing training opportunities. This will benefit staff, who are among our worst-paid workers, and improve child development.

- Extend the 30 free hours to all two year olds, and move towards making some childcare available for one year-olds and extending maternity pay to 12 months.

- Propose four new public holidays bringing our country together to mark our four national patron saints’ days. These will be additional to statutory holiday.

- End the Public Sector Pay Cap because public sector workers deserve a pay rise after years of falling wages.

- The pension age is due to rise to 66 by the end of 2020. Labour  rejects the Conservatives’ proposal to increase the state pension age even further. We will commission a new review of the pension age, specifically tasked with developing a ȵe[ible retirement policy to reȵect both the contributions made by people, the wide variations in life expectancy, and the arduous conditions of some work.

- Increase Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) by £30 per week for those in the work-related activity group, and repeal cuts in the UC limited capacity for work element.
 
- Increase Carer’s Allowance by £11 to the level of Jobseekers’ Allowance.

-Labour will invest in early intervention by increasing the proportion of mental health  budgets spent on support for children and young people.  We will ensure that access to a counselling service is available for all children in secondary schools.

- (On the NHS) Labour will commit to over £30 billion in extra funding over the next Parliament.

- Our first urgent task will be to address the immediate funding crisis. We will increase the social care budgets by a further £8 billion over the lifetime of the next Parliament, including an additional £1 billion for the first year.

- Labour will consider the reinstatement of other legal aid entitlements after receiving the final recommendations of the Access to justice Commission led by Lord Bach.

- A Labour government will complete the HS2 high-speed rail line from London through Birmingham to Leeds and Manchester and then into Scotland, consulting with communities affected about the optimal route. We will link HS2  with other rail investments, such as Crossrail of the North (tying together our great Northern cities) and on to the Durham Freight Centre. We will build a new Brighton Main Line for the South East.

- In London, to ensure our capital continues to prosper, we will build Crossrail 2.

- To harness the economic potential of new technologies and science, we will complete the Science Vale transport arc that runs from Oxford to Cambridge through Milton Keynes.And we will deliver rail electrification and expansion across the whole country, including in Wales and the South West. We will also consult  with local communities to re-open branch lines.

- We will retrofit thousands of diesel buses in areas with the most severe air quality problems to Euro 6 standards.

- We will introduce a £1 billion Cultural Capital Fund to upgrade our existing cultural and creative infrastructure to be ready for the digital age and invest in creative clusters across the country, based on a similar model to enterprise zones. Administered by the Arts Council, the fund will be available over a five-year period. It will be among the biggest arts infrastructure funds ever, transforming the country’s cultural landscape.

- We will establish a Scottish Investment Bank, with £20 billion of funds available to local projects and Scotland’s small businesses, creating work and stimulating the economy.

 

Edited by SuperTramp

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It's interesting when tied up with this dataset:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1IUj_AGJS5WywibuptGr4lZVP9M0QCTvkZQ0Q_Pp9CHw/edit#gid=1

Which shows that the UK, despite various tax regimes and rates, has never been able to collect more than about 37.5% of GDP in taxes (the UK is currently collecting 36%).

So when Labour party representatives say they'll pay for it with tax rises (for example cutting VAT exemption on private school fees, or raising taxes on those earning over 80,000), it doesn't ring true.

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2 hours ago, SuperTramp said:

Given that there is a possibility of a general election that will follow the Brexit shambles.

I thought I would investigate some of the party manifestoes (https://labour.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/labour-manifesto-2017.pdf).

Here is Labour's (specifically the bits on spending, the section on Brexit is so vague as to be as meaningless as Treason May):

 

Looks like Viv Nicholson wrote it.

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5 minutes ago, NTB said:

In summary then, Labour will spend an awful lot of money that doesn't exist and make business 2% less productive. Did I miss anything?

To be fair thats what all parties offer, hence the 2 trillion pound debt and the need to print and debase our currency.

Whatever is in any future manifesto the future govt is going to have to start taxing wealth as opposed to income, not sure either party realise this or is willing to do so.

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9 minutes ago, Band said:

To be fair thats what all parties offer, hence the 2 trillion pound debt and the need to print and debase our currency.

Whatever is in any future manifesto the future govt is going to have to start taxing wealth as opposed to income, not sure either party realise this or is willing to do so.

Broadly true I guess but Ukip would scrap HS2 and the foreign aid budget according to their manifesto.

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                                                                                                UKIP

 

 

Policies for the People’ is the tag line used for the interim manifesto that was launched at UKIP’s conference yesterday.

The party’s policy team have been working the document up for several months and although it is not a complete manifesto, it was decided that it should be launched at Conference.

In the introduction, leader Gerard Batten says he wants UKIP to be a populist party – a party whose policies are popular with the voters. He explained that the manifesto could not include every policy area or every detail but represents a summary of where UKIP is now. “It is a dynamic document and policies will be developed further in the future,” he says.

The first and presumably the most important policy is Brexit: UKIP stands for a complete and total withdrawal from the European Union.

Outside the European Union Britain will be a more prosperous nation. It will regain control of its trade policy, free business from unnecessary regulation, regain control of its agricultural industry and restore its fishing industry. Increased prosperity will mean more jobs and more tax revenue to pay for the things we all want for the British people.

On the NHS, UKIP believes it should be free at the point of delivery but points out that the service is in crisis, not just from a lack of adequate funding but because of the inefficient use of funds, Private Finance Initiative (PFI) contract liabilities, and ever-increasing demand from foreign nationals who should have no entitlement to use its services free of charge.

The manifesto points out that:

EU open borders have created a major drain on resources by bringing in around 3.8 million additional people. Many of these people will have no history of contributing significant tax revenue to help pay for the NHS but have the same entitlement as British citizens. When Britain leaves the EU, this entitlement must not be extended to any new arrivals.

It promises to terminate the PFI contracts which are ‘draining much needed funds out of our NHS’ and will waive tuition fees for doctors, nurses and midwives in exchange for a minimum five-year period to be worked in the NHS. The party would also scrap hospital car parking charges wherever possible.

On social care the party intends to increase funding by £2bn per annum and recognises that an increasing number of younger people are suffering from mental health. This needs to be addressed.

The party is committed to maintaining a strong and robust supportive safety net for those in genuine need, but which will not be a soft-touch on welfare. While it will end the current work capability assessments, it will not pay child benefits for non-UK resident children of foreign citizens and will prohibit foreign nationals resident here from benefits until the have paid UK tax for five years.

UKIP will introduce a selective and limited Australian style points-based immigration system. Immigration for permanent settlement must be strictly limited and workers on permits will be expected to possess private health insurance as a condition of entry to the UK, as will students.

The party insists it doesn’t have a housing problem – it has a supply problem, with demand being fuelled by mass uncontrolled immigration.

One of the most significant problems has been that immigrants from the European Union have enjoyed access to social housing on the same basis as British citizens. Post Brexit, UKIP would end this.

The party will abolish Stamp Duty (see section 21. Taxation) thereby saving house buyers £16.2bn per annum.

The manifesto claims that the state education system ‘is turning out a large number of children who are functionally innumerate and illiterate’. It will encourage the establishment of new grammar schools, and will waive tuition fees for further and higher education in subjects vital to our national life: science, technology, engineering, mathematics.

UKIP opposes gender confusion ideologies and the implementation of compulsory LGBT-inclusive relationships education in primary schools, due to be introduced from September 2019.

UKIP will scrap HS2. At an estimated cost of £100bn this vanity project is not affordable but will invest in the existing railways to improve capacity and journey times.

The transport policy is to support the transition to electric vehicles. However the electric charging infrastructure is not keeping pace. We will support the installation of charging stations by diverting funds from the electric car subsidy. We will also encourage off-street parking and charging provision in all new housing and industrial developments through the local planning process. The party also supports the development of driverless car technology.

On foreign aid, Britain’s foreign policy will not need to be linked to the EU’s Common Security and Defence Policy after Brexit, which would inevitably involve us in the EU’s planned armed forces and embroil us in its foreign policy ambitions. We should put the needs of our own citizens first. Our foreign aid budget is often wasted on corrupt regimes, or given to countries that can afford their own atomic weapon and space programmes.

UKIP will scrap the target of 0.7% GNI for Overseas Aid and return £14 billion to HM Treasury to assist our own citizens in our own country.

The party has declared that we ‘should not get involved in international conflicts unless it can be clearly shown to be in the national interest’. It supports NATO but will withdraw from PESCO.

Britain’s Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force have been so reduced in size that they struggle to meet their commitments. UKIP is committed to adequately funding Britain’s armed forces. UKIP will initiate a defence review to consider our future defence requirements and the size and shape of our armed forces. UK manufacturers should get first call on providing our armed forces equipment.

UKIP is committed to maintaining the Trident nuclear deterrent.

Several other manifesto policies are outlined including those on veterans, police, the prison service, agriculture, fisheries, the economy, trade, industry, energy, the environment, small businesses, taxation, children and families, sexual exploitation and paedophile gangs, animal welfare, extreme Islam, the constitution, political reform, English identity, free speech and political correctness.

The full manifesto can be seen here.

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1 hour ago, shindigger said:

Is anyone likely to take any notice of these in future?

Well give they say one thing to gain power and then do something entirely different once in power, I would guess that’ll be a no. 

Duplicitous bastards the lot of ‘em 

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13 hours ago, One percent said:

Well give they say one thing to gain power and then do something entirely different once in power, I would guess that’ll be a no. 

Duplicitous bastards the lot of ‘em 

 

14 hours ago, Long time lurking said:

                                                                                                UKIP

 

 

Policies for the People’ is the tag line used for the interim manifesto that was launched at UKIP’s conference yesterday.

The party’s policy team have been working the document up for several months and although it is not a complete manifesto, it was decided that it should be launched at Conference.

In the introduction, leader Gerard Batten says he wants UKIP to be a populist party – a party whose policies are popular with the voters. He explained that the manifesto could not include every policy area or every detail but represents a summary of where UKIP is now. “It is a dynamic document and policies will be developed further in the future,” he says.

The first and presumably the most important policy is Brexit: UKIP stands for a complete and total withdrawal from the European Union.

Outside the European Union Britain will be a more prosperous nation. It will regain control of its trade policy, free business from unnecessary regulation, regain control of its agricultural industry and restore its fishing industry. Increased prosperity will mean more jobs and more tax revenue to pay for the things we all want for the British people.

On the NHS, UKIP believes it should be free at the point of delivery but points out that the service is in crisis, not just from a lack of adequate funding but because of the inefficient use of funds, Private Finance Initiative (PFI) contract liabilities, and ever-increasing demand from foreign nationals who should have no entitlement to use its services free of charge.

The manifesto points out that:

EU open borders have created a major drain on resources by bringing in around 3.8 million additional people. Many of these people will have no history of contributing significant tax revenue to help pay for the NHS but have the same entitlement as British citizens. When Britain leaves the EU, this entitlement must not be extended to any new arrivals.

It promises to terminate the PFI contracts which are ‘draining much needed funds out of our NHS’ and will waive tuition fees for doctors, nurses and midwives in exchange for a minimum five-year period to be worked in the NHS. The party would also scrap hospital car parking charges wherever possible.

On social care the party intends to increase funding by £2bn per annum and recognises that an increasing number of younger people are suffering from mental health. This needs to be addressed.

The party is committed to maintaining a strong and robust supportive safety net for those in genuine need, but which will not be a soft-touch on welfare. While it will end the current work capability assessments, it will not pay child benefits for non-UK resident children of foreign citizens and will prohibit foreign nationals resident here from benefits until the have paid UK tax for five years.

UKIP will introduce a selective and limited Australian style points-based immigration system. Immigration for permanent settlement must be strictly limited and workers on permits will be expected to possess private health insurance as a condition of entry to the UK, as will students.

The party insists it doesn’t have a housing problem – it has a supply problem, with demand being fuelled by mass uncontrolled immigration.

One of the most significant problems has been that immigrants from the European Union have enjoyed access to social housing on the same basis as British citizens. Post Brexit, UKIP would end this.

The party will abolish Stamp Duty (see section 21. Taxation) thereby saving house buyers £16.2bn per annum.

The manifesto claims that the state education system ‘is turning out a large number of children who are functionally innumerate and illiterate’. It will encourage the establishment of new grammar schools, and will waive tuition fees for further and higher education in subjects vital to our national life: science, technology, engineering, mathematics.

UKIP opposes gender confusion ideologies and the implementation of compulsory LGBT-inclusive relationships education in primary schools, due to be introduced from September 2019.

UKIP will scrap HS2. At an estimated cost of £100bn this vanity project is not affordable but will invest in the existing railways to improve capacity and journey times.

The transport policy is to support the transition to electric vehicles. However the electric charging infrastructure is not keeping pace. We will support the installation of charging stations by diverting funds from the electric car subsidy. We will also encourage off-street parking and charging provision in all new housing and industrial developments through the local planning process. The party also supports the development of driverless car technology.

On foreign aid, Britain’s foreign policy will not need to be linked to the EU’s Common Security and Defence Policy after Brexit, which would inevitably involve us in the EU’s planned armed forces and embroil us in its foreign policy ambitions. We should put the needs of our own citizens first. Our foreign aid budget is often wasted on corrupt regimes, or given to countries that can afford their own atomic weapon and space programmes.

UKIP will scrap the target of 0.7% GNI for Overseas Aid and return £14 billion to HM Treasury to assist our own citizens in our own country.

The party has declared that we ‘should not get involved in international conflicts unless it can be clearly shown to be in the national interest’. It supports NATO but will withdraw from PESCO.

Britain’s Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force have been so reduced in size that they struggle to meet their commitments. UKIP is committed to adequately funding Britain’s armed forces. UKIP will initiate a defence review to consider our future defence requirements and the size and shape of our armed forces. UK manufacturers should get first call on providing our armed forces equipment.

UKIP is committed to maintaining the Trident nuclear deterrent.

Several other manifesto policies are outlined including those on veterans, police, the prison service, agriculture, fisheries, the economy, trade, industry, energy, the environment, small businesses, taxation, children and families, sexual exploitation and paedophile gangs, animal welfare, extreme Islam, the constitution, political reform, English identity, free speech and political correctness.

The full manifesto can be seen here.

Sounds logical, so probably will be roundly rejected by most the country!

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Well, I say logical. I probably wouldnt scrap stamp duty, and we already have a points based immigration system in practice. As has been noted many times before, Australia ia one of the few countries that has HIGHER immigration numbers than the UK, and given UKIPs (certainly important) focus on scale of immigration, such a policy doesnt really help, IMO. 

 

Immigration should cease to be an economic tool, IMO. The benefits are debatable, and, at best , marginal. Immigration should be one the basis of marriage, and marriage only. Take away all the arranged marriages, and annual net inflows could easily be reduced to around 20,000 a year. 

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"we continue to believe no deal is better than a bad deal for the UK"

"as we leave the EU, we will no longer be part of the customs union or single market"

"we will seek a comprehensive free trade agreement"

 

With such barefaced lies, any Brexiteer considering voting Tory should be referred for a CAT scan.

(Tory manifesto 2017)

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4 hours ago, PatronizingGit said:

Well, I say logical. I probably wouldnt scrap stamp duty, and we already have a points based immigration system in practice. As has been noted many times before, Australia ia one of the few countries that has HIGHER immigration numbers than the UK, and given UKIPs (certainly important) focus on scale of immigration, such a policy doesnt really help, IMO. 

 

Immigration should cease to be an economic tool, IMO. The benefits are debatable, and, at best , marginal. Immigration should be one the basis of marriage, and marriage only. Take away all the arranged marriages, and annual net inflows could easily be reduced to around 20,000 a year. 

As for Australia and immigration its a as and when needed basis ,with the work permit side of it ,and you can be sure if the sector you are working in starts to slow down it will be you ,not the indigenous that are first to go,this is how it should work 

As for residency you really have to have something to offer,it`s age/wealth limited as well  

I agree on the stamp duty but i see that as a trying to please all policy 

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