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spunko

Right To Repair

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11 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

Fight for the Right to use Araldite!

Spudgers are your friends!

Are you still looking for the reverse gear dogshaft sprocket, for your imaginary uncle's historic 1934 Flying Winnet sidecar combination, that you were conceived in?

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, spunko said:

How else do you learn about the mechanics of a car if you can't tinker about under the bonnet?

I hate getting caked in grease and oil so I probably still wouldn't bother but a lot of people would.

OBD1 and OBD2 regs were part of a type of right to repair ruling,the result of that was once great /simple self diagnostics contained in the ECU was whittled away and complicated to the point it made it very difficult to pointless for the independent garage to attempt to fix the problem no matter the owner  

Now don`t even get me started on CANBUS   

Edited by Long time lurking

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6 hours ago, spunko said:

Maybe, like the Energy Efficiency ratings. Stupidly they didn't realise that "A" rated appliances 10 years later would have to be rated above "A" so now we have this ridiculous A++, A+ and soon A+++ system.

Anyway, for purely selfish reasons even if it does apply to new cars it doesn't matter to my longterm goal of buying an old 70s "shitter" (!) like this MG Midget Ashley GT. :x

 

 

You will need to visit this place https://www.specialist-components.co.uk/index.php/shop/twinkam-16v-conversion.html it will transform it beyond belief 

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14 minutes ago, MrPin said:

Are you still looking for the reverse gear dogshaft sprocket, for your imaginary uncle's historic 1934 Flying Winnet sidecar combination, that you were conceived in?

I fround that a Throgmorton BizzyBee lawnmower sunwheel worked if it was packed out with newspaper around the shaft spline.

It rattles like shit but so does the engine so no-one notices anyway.

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2 hours ago, Chewing Grass said:

Citroen are also famous for using M7 threaded fasteners to confuse the unwary.

VW do the same with fine metric threads on suspension parts ,rusty bolt head that rounds off, VW it is I just paid the best part of 20 quid for two M14 bolts and almost a tenner for the nuts

 

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Used to do most of the mechanical stuff on cars including the basics of oil/filter changes, brake pads, swapping fronts and backs etc. Don't do a single thing these days apart from change a bulb (and even that can involve taking half the engine out). I had to take the car into the main dealer when the seat wouldn't move forward (3 door), spent about 30 minutes trying to figure out how the f**k to get the seat out and decided I CBA. Everything seems designed to make it impossible to tackle or such an aggravation you won't bother, very effective revenue generator for the manufacturer.

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35 minutes ago, MrPin said:

Are you still looking for the reverse gear dogshaft sprocket, for your imaginary uncle's historic 1934 Flying Winnet sidecar combination, that you were conceived in?

There's one on Ebay

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In 1990 my uncle's old dishwasher packed up so he asked me to fix it. The impeller seal had gone and let water into the motor bearings which had rusted. Rang the manufacturer, impeller and seal kit £11.80 new motor £132. What about just the bearings I asked. Sorry sir but it's a sealed unit you can't dismantle it. When I told her they should have told me before I stripped it down she wasn't amused.

I ordered the seal kit and rang my local bearing stockist with the part number. They had two that would fit, the cheap version the same as the original or a mega expensive waterproof version.

Standard £1.68

Waterproof £2.89

I splashed out on the waterproof version, dishwasher is still working fine.

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5 hours ago, nickc said:

or you could 20 years ago......

Had a Citroen heater blower fail about that time ..... needed brushes...... but had to buy the motor plus the huge plastic housing.....£98!!

I once fixed a blower motor on an Audi that was well known for the brushes failing. Audi being all over engineered they had used a very soft sort of sintered bronze. Probably conducted better and/or less arcing than carbon brushes, but they wore out very quickly.

Audi wanted around £350 for a new blower motor.

Even a pattern blower was around £200.

I bought a pair of large carbon brushes for under a tenner and filed them down to fit....

I noticed a year later someone started selling replacement brushes on ebay.

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4 hours ago, Happy Renting said:

There is a downside.

A lot of cheap consumer stuff is made to clip together without screws, etc.

One place I used to work did a lot of ultrasonic welding of plastic. The machines make a bloody awful noise - like somebody wringing out a guinea pig.

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1 hour ago, eight said:

One place I used to work did a lot of ultrasonic welding of plastic. The machines make a bloody awful noise - like somebody wringing out a guinea pig.

You could hear ultrasonic welders?

Are you a bat?

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, DoINeedOne said:

When I was a kid my parents used to give me old alarm clocks, bits of wire and switches, battery packs and those silly little light bulbs.

I would sit for hours just stipping stuff down or trying to work out how things worked then went on to woodwork

Phew, thought you were about to say something else! 

Edited by Harley

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I've just half-fixed a Playstation 3 I found dumped on the street. It was dead easy to strip it down, which is good as I needed to do it three times, as I failed to diagnose that the problem was the fan before I put it back together the first time, and then the replacement (£6.99 delivered from Ebay) needed some shimming to not catch on the heatsink assembly.

Now I've tested it I've found that the laser in the disc drive appears to be faulty. Replacements are ~£10 delivered from China. I'm in two minds about whether to bother as I already have a working PS3, and this one ought to still work for streaming Amazon Prime stuff to our bedroom TV, which is the only other use I can find for a second one.

Edited by Rave

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My workshop stereo is a Panasonic which must be >30 years old that I have wired a 3.5mm socket to the long dead cassette pick up to stream web radio through the smart phone, or can tune in to sw, mw , lw or fm on the japanese board which still works fine. The work van is 13 years old, but I reckon the engine and trans has about 250k miles left in it, just a matter of stopping the body panels from rotting, I increasingly hear of other tradesmen that work within half an hour from home sticking with the rougher but more robust older vans which are more profitable to keep on the road. Much admiration for the repairers finding ways around the corporate feckers, like the phone repairers figuring out how to melt glues without damaging electronics to replace batteries and other components.

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The wave of cheap consumer goods from China made it uneconomical to repair a lot of goods 

My dad’s business was sales and repairs of white goods etc 

In the 80’s he charged £5 to replace the lead on a steam iron, early 2000’s you could buy a new steam iron in Tesco for £5 or a branded one from about £15 

I still take great satisfaction in being able to fix items that others throw away that I learned from my dad and also do my own car servicing and as many repairs as possible 

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16 hours ago, Libspero said:

I guess the comparable current day product would be the Miele products.  They are reputed to be well built and repairable.   How much is a decent Miele compared to a standard cheap product ?

IIRC MIele washer was around £500 compared £300 for another brand's cheapie, around 10 years of use and no issues at all thus far and has been hammered with working clothes. The fact that you see their service vans around shows that at least it is part of their model. Suspect spares and repair rates will not be cheap though.

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1 hour ago, Malthus said:

The wave of cheap consumer goods from China made it uneconomical to repair a lot of goods 

My dad’s business was sales and repairs of white goods etc 

In the 80’s he charged £5 to replace the lead on a steam iron, early 2000’s you could buy a new steam iron in Tesco for £5 or a branded one from about £15 

I still take great satisfaction in being able to fix items that others throw away that I learned from my dad and also do my own car servicing and as many repairs as possible 

I wonder whether the establishment have gotten wind that the supply of cheap disposable goods from China is going to be turned off and we will be returning to a period of make do and mend? 

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2 hours ago, One percent said:

I wonder whether the establishment have gotten wind that the supply of cheap disposable goods from China is going to be turned off and we will be returning to a period of make do and mend? 

I think that's a big part of it.  Not just China,  the West are rapidly running out of low wage countries to exploit generally.      I expect Chinese Products Index of inflation could be quite hard to maintain at the 2-3% mark in the nearish future.

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8 minutes ago, Libspero said:

I think that's a big part of it.  Not just China,  the West are rapidly running out of low wage countries to exploit generally.      I expect Chinese Products Index of inflation could be quite hard to maintain at the 2-3% mark in the nearish future.

Would be one heck of a trade tariff too - imagine a retailer having to sell equipment with a guaranteed supply of parts for X years into the future, going out and buying the cheapest short run tat would be out of the question - if the rules were strictly enforced with say punitive fines for retailers/suppliers where  customers could prove they had bought unserviceable equipment of whatever good/dubious quality in the first place). 

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I've found most stuff these days is rebadged generic stuff so parts can be easier to find.  For example, parts for my electric log splitter. I do however have issues finding the absolute correct parts given small product changes which are hard to check on-line.  The manufacturers could do a good business if make do and mend gets going by collaborating on a single portal.  Or maybe I need a 3D printer!

Edited by Harley

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5 minutes ago, Harley said:

I've found most stuff these days is rebadged generic stuff so parts can be easier to find. 

A few of the larger retailers have the manufactures "modify" standard products so they get a different part number (I'm looking at you Curry's).

They will get the position of two buttons reversed or even just different colour labels.

This benefits them in two ways:

1  the can't buy the same item cheaper anywhere anywhere else guarantee.

2.  They are the only people who hold spares for that model number so can charge the earth.

I always check the manufacturer's range for similar items and find out the best price for the same thing albeit with a different name/part number.

Some retailers even have their own branded versions of items which follow the same pattern of deceit.

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There also has been a move away from standardisation that makes things much more difficult to fix 

I think it was a Toyota Corolla that my dad had in the 70’s that came with a comprehensive tool kit 

Double end spanner 10mm/13mm

Screwdriver plain / Philips reversible 

Wheel brace and jack 

That was all that was needed to carry out any but the most major repair 

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Electric log splitter: Capacitor gone.  Standard industry one so just bought one.  Got it say £5 whereas would have been over £25 had I gone through a workshop, the supplier, etc.  Bought case as well, and yes switches in different locations but an improvement (more protected).  Just had to modify the mounts (drill two holes).

Stihl chainsaw: Carb silted up due to leaving petrol in it.  Could have spent a bit of time or money cleaning it out but identified manufacturer and part number and bought the generic carb.  Best as the standard replacement offered was a different manufacturer and model so may not have been the best.

Car: Heating blower actuator went.  £+ to replace with standard.  Bought for next to nothing from ebay US.  Oh b*gger, wrong was round as steering wheel on other side of car.  Er think!  Sure enough the part was made to work on both car types, just turn one internal part around!

Car:  Crash sensor went.  Cost a bomb to get diagnosed (cost would have paid for my own kit for next time!).  Good garage found one for about £50+.  Saw quotes for over £100.  Got one (defo OEM) from Germany for about £25(?) incl CIF.

Mower: Open market for parts (at least in the US).  Loads of equivalent part numbers to the OEM.  Far cheaper (but quality can rarely vary, esp belts).  Indeed, even the mower manufacturer is using OEM parts (e.g. Mountfield versus HYP).  Probably same company or at least same supply chain!

Switches: CPC Farnell, etc seem to stock the ones used on many pieces of equipment.

............

Just wish internet searching for this stuff was easier as quite time consuming.

Edited by Harley

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Loads of washing machines and tumble driers scrapped because the drum and motor don't turn, usually the capacitor.

Most expensive one I've bought was £9, easy replacement.

 

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