• Welcome to DOSBODS

    Please consider creating a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

Sign in to follow this  
spunko

Right To Repair

Recommended Posts

23 minutes ago, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

Isn't yours old and Japanese though? (ie still works and will likely continue to do so)

Those old Brit sports cars are pretty but you need a passion for them because they're not a reliable utilitarian vehicle.

If I do ever get one it'll be a summer driver and only locally. I want to learn the basics, I don't know anything about the mechanics of cars. Once I get a garage... :Old:

27 minutes ago, MrPin said:

You are inspiring my to get rid of my old car, and get an even older one.

Oi, hands off ! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Cars are a nightmare had to change a sensor on partners car took nearly a day because I had to remove so much stuff, then you have the headache of remembering where it all went and why do I have this screw left over 9_9

When I was a kid my parents used to give me old alarm clocks, bits of wire and switches, battery packs and those silly little light bulbs I would sit for hours just stipping stuff down or trying to work out how things worked then went on to woodwork

Also remembering spending hours with friends working on our bikes or skateboards how many kids actually do stuff like that now

a lot bits at home I have fixed rather than buying new but you only need to go to the tip to see the amount crap people throw away that still seems in good nick

Edited by DoINeedOne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, 201p said:

PC computers are the greatest modern self repairing products of our time. A computer's electronics can last for most part 10+ years. The case can last forever, so can keyboards. When the insides get out of date, they can be swapped out pretty easily, and can be repaired by PC technicians without having to buy specialist manufacturer tools. You don't have to take it to a "main dealer".

 

Henry Hoovers also get a thumbs up, as the design doesn't radically change year after year. You can get replacement hoses and attachments, bags, and motors......and brushes.

 

or you could 20 years ago......

Had a Citroen heater blower fail about that time ..... needed brushes...... but had to buy the motor plus the huge plastic housing.....£98!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, DoINeedOne said:

Cars are a nightmare had to change a sensor on partners car took nearly a day because I had to remove so much stuff, then you have the headache of remembering where it all went and why do I have this screw left over 9_9


Youtube.

Or video yourself taking it apart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Came across an interesting chap Robert David Steel (in connection with Q, as it happens). He's very hot on open sour e e everything- technology, intelligence, everything.

Eg he talks about a tractor costing $250,000 that can be used in India (say) but it's stuffed with proprietary hardware and software and is irreparable by it's owner. And he contrasts that with a just-as-good tractor, open source, cost $25,000 that is easily repairable in the field using 3d printing, ordinary spanners etc, and says we've really gone down the wrong path/paradigm. Interesting chap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, sarahbell said:


Youtube.

Or video yourself taking it apart.

The car has worked fine since I'm sure it was not needed O.o

Point is if stuff was more accessible I could have repaired it quicker and had to remove fewer parts, They do it on purpose I swear

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, DoINeedOne said:

 

a lot bits at home I have fixed rather than buying new but you only need to go to the tip to see the amount crap people throw away that still seems in good nick

Don't, if it wasn't for the fact that I've got too much stuff I end up bringing back more from the tip than I took.

4 minutes ago, DoINeedOne said:

The car has worked fine since I'm sure it was not needed O.o

Point is if stuff was more accessible I could have repaired it quicker and had to remove fewer parts, They do it on purpose I swear

 

Car designers are really clever. When you think about something as simple as the spanner included in the tool kit its designed so that whenever you need to remove a wheel nut it is the exact length needed to scrape the skin off your knuckle on one of the nuts removed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, sleepwello'nights said:

Don't, if it wasn't for the fact that I've got too much stuff I end up bringing back more from the tip than I took.

Car designers are really clever. When you think about something as simple as the spanner included in the tool kit its designed so that whenever you need to remove a wheel nut it is the exact length needed to scrape the skin off your knuckle on one of the nuts removed.

Oh car designers like to use odd fixing sizes, stuff the average home mechanic won't have in their tool kit, like 7mm hex screws.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO this will only be a positive if they are made so that anyone with an IQ over 50 can fix them themselves.

The reason being,  the reason nobody gets anything repaired is not the component cost,  but the cost of getting someone to actually do the job.

If your washing machine broke most of the modules for it probably are available..  say £60 quid for an electronics box or something.

But then you probably end up having to pay someone £100 to come and fit it and take the risk of sucking up the cost if they've spec'd it wrong.

So you're looking at £160 to repair..   or you could just  get a nice new shiny one for £300.   Most people go for the nice new shiny one because "the old one is on its last legs anyway".

If the spares a £60 quid,  but are easy to trouble shoot and install..  yes people would probably do it.

But I expect this new generation of high quality appliance will cost at least double, if not triple the current retail price point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Snark said:

Oh car designers like to use odd fixing sizes, stuff the average home mechanic won't have in their tool kit, like 7mm hex screws.

Don't forget the "special tool" that costs £500.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Libspero said:

 

But I expect this new generation of high quality appliance will cost at least double, if not triple the current retail price point.

On;y if they do some serious industry wide price fixing.

What's needed is good old school designers, people who've been tinkering for decades and know how to design stuff for ease of repair.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Snark said:

On;y if they do some serious industry wide price fixing.

What's needed is good old school designers, people who've been tinkering for decades and know how to design stuff for ease of repair.

I guess the comparable current day product would be the Miele products.  They are reputed to be well built and repairable.   How much is a decent Miele compared to a standard cheap product ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Option5 said:

Don't forget the "special tool" that costs £500.

 

Oh yeah, who could forget, I had Peugeot in the early 2000's, it was built almost entirely using TORX screws, from the interior panels to the suspension top mounts, back then it was VERY hard to get decent TORX tools. On top of that the alloy wheels were centreless, not a problem these days, but back then only Peugeot dealers could balance them, and they'd refuse to do it if you didn't buy your tyres from them......................

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Snark said:

 

Oh yeah, who could forget, I had Peugeot in the early 2000's, it was built almost entirely using TORX screws, from the interior panels to the suspension top mounts, back then it was VERY hard to get decent TORX tools. On top of that the alloy wheels were centreless, not a problem these days, but back then only Peugeot dealers could balance them, and they'd refuse to do it if you didn't buy your tyres from them......................

You can get a very decent Torx set, and everything else now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One way to reduce wastage would be to have component systems in most appliances. Eg, most of a washing machine is just a metal drum and casing. If all the circuitry etc could just be removed and replaced with some sort of cassette system, it would help the environment enormously. This has been the norm with hi-fi systems for decades. Bicycles too, if you think about it. Very few people would dump an entire bike if just the front wheel needed to be replaced.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, DoINeedOne said:

Cars are a nightmare had to change a sensor on partners car took nearly a day because I had to remove so much stuff, then you have the headache of remembering where it all went and why do I have this screw left over 9_9

When I was a kid my parents used to give me old alarm clocks, bits of wire and switches, battery packs and those silly little light bulbs I would sit for hours just stipping stuff down or trying to work out how things worked then went on to woodwork

Also remembering spending hours with friends working on our bikes or skateboards how many kids actually do stuff like that now

a lot bits at home I have fixed rather than buying new but you only need to go to the tip to see the amount crap people throw away that still seems in good nick

The new "clock boy"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DocH said:

Came across an interesting chap Robert David Steel (in connection with Q, as it happens). He's very hot on open sour e e everything- technology, intelligence, everything.

Eg he talks about a tractor costing $250,000 that can be used in India (say) but it's stuffed with proprietary hardware and software and is irreparable by it's owner. And he contrasts that with a just-as-good tractor, open source, cost $25,000 that is easily repairable in the field using 3d printing, ordinary spanners etc, and says we've really gone down the wrong path/paradigm. Interesting chap.

I was going to make that point about printers. If we're going to have bodies such as the EU then this is the sort of thing they should be involving themselves in - like there should be one generic ink formulation that all printer manufacturers are obliged to use. Standardised tanks even.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, sarahbell said:

https://repaircafe.org/en/

 

:)

Near me (well I say near)

Manchester Repair Café
Stitched Up HQ
527B WIlbraham Road
Manchester

I know one of the Stitched up ladies. :)
 

Levenshulme Repair Café
Levenshulme Inspire
747 Stockport Rd, Manchester
Manchester

Never heard of this concept before and these are quite near to me, so thanks for the heads up, might pop by one day!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, Snark said:

 

Oh yeah, who could forget, I had Peugeot in the early 2000's, it was built almost entirely using TORX screws, from the interior panels to the suspension top mounts, back then it was VERY hard to get decent TORX tools. On top of that the alloy wheels were centreless, not a problem these days, but back then only Peugeot dealers could balance them, and they'd refuse to do it if you didn't buy your tyres from them......................

Citroen are also famous for using M7 threaded fasteners to confuse the unwary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a downside.

A lot of cheap consumer stuff is made to clip together without screws, etc.

It makes them cheaper to manufacture.

Seals, ec., may be damaged if an item is disassembled.

Carrying a spares inventory to support repair services will involve huge costs.

This initiative may backfire, especially for low-cost consumer items.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

There is a downside.

A lot of cheap consumer stuff is made to clip together without screws, etc.

 

 

 

Sounds like most Fords.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.