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WorkingPoor

NHS to stop prescriptions of Gluten free food

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About time they cracked down on the "get your gluten free food cheap on the nhs" charade

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/mar/28/nhs-draws-up-list-of-items-to-be-banned-from-prescriptions

Viagra on prescription is for the chop too as well as travel vaccinations and a raft of other stuff that people ought to be paying out of their own pocket. 

Edited by WorkingPoor

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I think it is worth pointing out that the range of gf food that you could get on the NHS was very limited. In many cases the cost of the prescription was more than the food as it is one prescription one item. So paying a tenner for a prescription to get a loaf of bread that costs £3.00 in the shops is a nonsense.

I suspect the cancelling is more to do with stopping suppliers to the NHS making a fortune out of huge mark-ups on gf food. Now they need to address all the suppliers of toilet rolls and pens.

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8 minutes ago, WorkingPoor said:

Viagra on prescription is for the chop too as well as travel vaccinations and a raft of other stuff that people ought to be paying out of their own pocket. 

Viagra's gone generic now anyway; so it's cheap as chips.

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Those who get free prescriptions also tend to use the prescription services for over the counter medicines such as aspirin and paracetamol. Surely prescriptions should be for prescription drugs only 

1 minute ago, The Masked Tulip said:

I think it is worth pointing out that the range of gf food that you could get on the NHS was very limited. In many cases the cost of the prescription was more than the food as it is one prescription one item. So paying a tenner for a prescription to get a loaf of bread that costs £3.00 in the shops is a nonsense.

I suspect the cancelling is more to do with stopping suppliers to the NHS making a fortune out of huge mark-ups on gf food. Now they need to address all the suppliers of toilet rolls and pens.

But many using this will be those who don't pay for prescriptions 😏

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No reason why anyone should need a prescription for gluten free, its not like they didn't have to eat already anyway - they just need to choose a bit more carefully.

Actually, a lot more carefully - as a lactose intolerant I'm regularly gobsmacked when I check the labels to find just how many processed foods contain milk. I've been in some supermarkets where you can't buy a fresh burger that doesn't contain milk.

But checking labels is hardly difficult, is it?

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What about the travel vaccinations? surely if your rich enough to go on long haul exotic destination holidays then you can stump up for a shot of yellow fever or typhoid at one of those "independant travel shops" 

I had the yellow fever / typhoid travel vac once, i was sick as a dog for a couple of days after.

Edited by WorkingPoor

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8 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

I think it is worth pointing out that the range of gf food that you could get on the NHS was very limited. In many cases the cost of the prescription was more than the food as it is one prescription one item. So paying a tenner for a prescription to get a loaf of bread that costs £3.00 in the shops is a nonsense.

I suspect the cancelling is more to do with stopping suppliers to the NHS making a fortune out of huge mark-ups on gf food. Now they need to address all the suppliers of toilet rolls and pens.

Partly.

It does not address the make-work/fross inefficencies of the NHS.

The NHS needs a proper local, regional and national accounting system to see where the money is going.

Its not money being wasted on gluten-free bread thats the problem - although agree it should not paying for gluten crap.

Start charing £20 for a GPs appointment.

Start checking/enforcing entitlement i.e. no health tourism, which is chronic in some places.

 

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26 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

I think it is worth pointing out that the range of gf food that you could get on the NHS was very limited. In many cases the cost of the prescription was more than the food as it is one prescription one item. So paying a tenner for a prescription to get a loaf of bread that costs £3.00 in the shops is a nonsense.

 

If you're getting your bread on prescription one loaf at a time then you'd buy a pre-payment certificate. Pretty sure they prescribe more than one loaf at a time anyway, I used to live with a ceoliac and she used to get about ten loaves at a time. 

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Used to work with ab Irish guy who dis ivered his intolerance to gluten in his late 50s after strugglibg for years. His Mrs used to make bread for him using some method that used potatoes instead of wheat. Looked ok if a bit denser than a normal loaf.

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52 minutes ago, spygirl said:

 

Start charing £20 for a GPs appointment.

Start checking/enforcing entitlement i.e. no health tourism, which is chronic in some places.

 

^ This.

For as long as I can remember the NHS has lurched from crisis to crisis. It's time the political parties stopped using the NHS as a political football and had a rational discussion on it.

 

 

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12 minutes ago, Nosler said:

^ This.

For as long as I can remember the NHS has lurched from crisis to crisis. It's time the political parties stopped using the NHS as a political football and had a rational discussion on it.

 

 

They all have admin staff and practice managers so must be capable of running it as a business (for that it what it is) 
No excuse.

 

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I'm not entirely signed up to this one.

Gluten intolerance is a disability (I don't have it, I don't know anybody with it so I'm not special pleading) and there is a general principle, with which I agree, that the government should aim to minimise the disadvantage that people have from disability.

So if someone has to pay a massive mark up over normal food prices (they quoted 6x for bread on the radio this morning) because of their disability then I would want a mechanism to reduce this.

A combination of price controls and subsidy might be cheaper.

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I had to have a bit of steroid cream for something on my hand last year. I went to the chemists ad bought some cream that had about 0.5%, IIRC, steroid in it. I used it for about 10 days and nothing happened. I went to the GP and got given a prescription for steroid cream at, IIRC, 1.5% strength. It worked in about 3 days. Crazy that I could not just buy that in the chemist.

2 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I'm not entirely signed up to this one.

Gluten intolerance is a disability (I don't have it, I don't know anybody with it so I'm not special pleading) and there is a general principle, with which I agree, that the government should aim to minimise the disadvantage that people have from disability.

So if someone has to pay a massive mark up over normal food prices (they quoted 6x for bread on the radio this morning) because of their disability then I would want a mechanism to reduce this.

A combination of price controls and subsidy might be cheaper.

I am about to write a complaint about seeing a staff member last week place all the gf bread on the floor - yuck. I have paid up to £4 for a tiny gf loaf at times.

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8 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I'm not entirely signed up to this one.

Gluten intolerance is a disability (I don't have it, I don't know anybody with it so I'm not special pleading) and there is a general principle, with which I agree, that the government should aim to minimise the disadvantage that people have from disability.

So if someone has to pay a massive mark up over normal food prices (they quoted 6x for bread on the radio this morning) because of their disability then I would want a mechanism to reduce this.

A combination of price controls and subsidy might be cheaper.

So's being allergic to peanuts. shellfish, bee stings.

People with a lguten problem will have an upset stomach.

People with a peanut allergy risk dying.

One gets free bread.

The other gets .. er... nothing.

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Ah but hang on a mo, is coeliac disease a disability? if so do you collect PIP / DLA? (enhanced benefit payments to reflect higher cost of living)

I have heard of people getting "vouchers" from their GP to exchange for gluten free foodstuffs in supermarkets. 

(also heard of alcoholics being given GP vouchers to exchange for booze but that is another story) 

Edited by WorkingPoor

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19 minutes ago, spygirl said:

So's being allergic to peanuts. shellfish, bee stings.

People with a lguten problem will have an upset stomach.

People with a peanut allergy risk dying.

One gets free bread.

The other gets .. er... nothing.

I deliberately said disability as opposed to allergy or illness.

If you're allergic to peanuts then you avoid peanuts. They are not a major foodstuff, you don't have to pay inflated sums to buy peanut free things.  So as it's not costing you anything because you have a peanut allergy there is nothing to reimburse.

I'm not saying give people money because they have gluten intolerance. I'm saying that having gluten intolerance already costs them money so it seems fair to reduce that cost.

Sure we all need to eat but it costs them more.

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1 minute ago, Frank Hovis said:

I deliberately said disability as opposed to allergy or illness.

If you're allergic to peanuts then you avoid peanuts. They are not a major foodstuff, you don't have to pay inflated sums to buy peanut free things.  So as it's not costing you anything because you have a peanut allergy there is nothing to reimburse.

I'm not saying give people money because they have gluten intolerance. I'm saying that having gluten intolerance already costs them money so it seems fair to reduce that cost.

Sure we all need to eat but it costs them more.

Although we do have a wheat based diet for carbs, there are other options - rice, etc.

Its not like there's no other just as cheap option.

And Western wheat consumption appears to be on a massive downer at the mo.

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Just now, spygirl said:

Although we do have a wheat based diet for carbs, there are other options - rice, etc.

Its not like there's no other just as cheap option.

And Western wheat consumption appears to be on a massive downer at the mo.

It's that bread and wheat products are such a large component of our ordinary diet, I didn't realise it was reducing, that it's difficult to replace it all.  It would be like being on a permanent strict diet whereas with the gluten free products you eat normally.

Dairy is also tricky; soya milk fine, no cheese fine, but butter or similar is in loads of things.  Though I don't know whether they have to strictly avoid all of it.

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22 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I'm not entirely signed up to this one.

Gluten intolerance is a disability (I don't have it, I don't know anybody with it so I'm not special pleading) and there is a general principle, with which I agree, that the government should aim to minimise the disadvantage that people have from disability.

So if someone has to pay a massive mark up over normal food prices (they quoted 6x for bread on the radio this morning) because of their disability then I would want a mechanism to reduce this.

A combination of price controls and subsidy might be cheaper.

Lactose free stuff is also more expensive and you don't get that on prescription. Plus you don't need to eat pasta and bread - I'm gluten intolerant and mostly just eat stuff that doesn't have gluten in it anyway. We pay a bit more for Taste the Difference sausages since they're gluten free, but they're nicer than normal sausages anyway and I very occasionally buy something like gluten free tortellini or bread.

I don't get free prescriptions for my asthma (unlike if I'd given myself diabetes by eating cake all day) and I don't currently get any help with the roughly £30 I spend a month on supplements for my chronic fatigue (I've just applied for PIP so that might change).

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Hopefully you get your PIP This Time.

There's a materiality consideration of course but in general the aim should be levelling the playing field in the case of increased costs as a result of genuine disability.

Taking it up some notches if someone's in a wheelchair I'm sure that everybody's happy that they receive financial help for transport so that they can get about.

 

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32 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Hopefully you get your PIP This Time.

There's a materiality consideration of course but in general the aim should be levelling the playing field in the case of increased costs as a result of genuine disability.

Taking it up some notches if someone's in a wheelchair I'm sure that everybody's happy that they receive financial help for transport so that they can get about.

 

Indeed Frank, and I don't beat up cripples. A lady friend on mine in IT support got a special van, and kept working, and being productive, and held down the job!

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1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

I'm not entirely signed up to this one.

Gluten intolerance is a disability (I don't have it, I don't know anybody with it so I'm not special pleading) and there is a general principle, with which I agree, that the government should aim to minimise the disadvantage that people have from disability.

I can not see without glasses. I do not get any help with my check up costs or the cost of my new glasses.

If I could have a new pair for the cost of a prescription (About £8 something?) then that'd be great.
 

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5 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

I can not see without glasses. I do not get any help with my check up costs or the cost of my new glasses.

If I could have a new pair for the cost of a prescription (About £8 something?) then that'd be great.
 

Can people not still get these on the NHS? They were always rubbish looking Buddy Holly ones but they were free.

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