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whitevanman

Where's my tribe?

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11 minutes ago, whitevanman said:

 

Is there a way out? 

Yes.

Well for me anyway it's getting outdoors to the remotest and wildest locations I possibly can, preferably where there isn't any fucker for fifty miles at least.

Things take on a different perspective out there. Tech and all of it's attendant vices suddenly become quite...insignificant.

Works for me.

 

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Yep, I was working up to posting a thread similar to yours.

Everybody's alienated and social spaces (pubs, cafes, clubs etc.) have all been monetized beyond affordability for people worn down by their underpaid work. The only things that are still cheap are supermarket grub + drink, Netflix/ Internet/ Social media and other indoor toys.

Multiculturalism is also playing a role.

When I lived in London in my 30s, I used to have my "tribe". We hung out at each other's flats and socialized cheaply even in The West End. I used to patronize Speaker's Corner every Sunday for a free intellectual fix, go fishing with pals and play pool in competitions around N. London. Lots of characters.

Where I am now people are all mostly working or recovering from work (indoors) and the sexual marketplace has been degraded by online dating.

The following book written in 2000 addressed the emerging problems which are all much worse now.

We're living in a land of loners.

4119NY82GCL._SX298_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bowling-Alone-Collapse-American-Community/dp/0743203046/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1548288044&sr=1-1&keywords=putnam+bowling+alone

BOWLING ALONE warns Americans that their stock of "social capital", the very fabric of their connections with each other, has been accelerating down. Putnam describes the resulting impoverishment of their lives and communities. Drawing on evidence that includes nearly half a million interviews conducted over a quarter of a century in America, Putnam shows how changes in work, family structure, age, suburban life, television, computers, women's roles and other factors are isolating Americans from each other in a trend whose reflection can clearly be seen in British society.

 

Edited by Turned Out Nice Again

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Football is the control tool of governments around the world.

90% are average to low IQ 

So they subsidise & promote football to give the masses some "tribalistic" release 

ie something to support and identify with and allow them to scream / chant warlike ditzy's against the oposing teams.

it prevents rioting and other social unrest as well as promoting "multiculturalism" by constantly plugging foreign signings like "Mohammed salah" and "Ole gunner solskaer" etc etc

#StampItOut initiative curries up mental images of low IQ football fans stamping on "racists" with studded boots etc etc

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Turned Out Nice Again said:

I think the way out is to get people together and energise them. Build it and they will come. That's what I plan to do in my sleepy berg.

I'm not sure it's possible in this country. As the world has got richer the malaise has spread everywhere that's not a third world shit hole. Everywhere the same story: financialisation, sterility, welfare, big government, atomisation and the loss of cultural legacy.

When I was a kid there were 'new age travellers', basically middle class dropouts who lived on the road and were involved in drugs and the rave scene. At the time they were demonised mercelessly in the press. Are they still around?

I'd be interested if anyone has any experience of attempting to go against these trends.

 

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30 minutes ago, whitevanman said:

I'm not sure it's possible in this country. As the world has got richer the malaise has spread everywhere that's not a third world shit hole. Everywhere the same story: financialisation, sterility, welfare, big government, atomisation and the loss of cultural legacy.

When I was a kid there were 'new age travellers', basically middle class dropouts who lived on the road and were involved in drugs and the rave scene. At the time they were demonised mercelessly in the press. Are they still around?

I'd be interested if anyone has any experience of attempting to go against these trends.

 

May i recommend reading Hagakure  

by Yamamoto Tsunetomo.

Read this and you will gain great insight my friend. 

 

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1 hour ago, whitevanman said:

I'm not sure it's possible in this country. As the world has got richer the malaise has spread everywhere that's not a third world shit hole. Everywhere the same story: financialisation, sterility, welfare, big government, atomisation and the loss of cultural legacy.

When I was a kid there were 'new age travellers', basically middle class dropouts who lived on the road and were involved in drugs and the rave scene. At the time they were demonised mercelessly in the press. Are they still around?

I'd be interested if anyone has any experience of attempting to go against these trends.

I don't think you can change the system but according to anarchist Hakim Bey in his 1980s pamphlet "Temporary Autonomous Zones" (PDF link below) local outbreaks of unregulated free-association are achievable - if only temporarily. He cites, for instance, pirate utopias of the 18th Century. I think hippie travellers and the rave scene were another recent examples in that tradition.

http://nomadism.org/pdf/taz.pdf

A personal case back from when I lived in London, a couple of musician friends and I approached the landlord of a failing local pub with the idea of setting up an open-mic night which ran for a year every Thursday night until the (early 19C.) pub was closed forever and sold to be converted into private flats. He provided free food and we ended up packing the place out for the best part of a year with acts of all calibres (from tone-deaf amateurs to semi-pros) which I videoed for fun and stuck up on a YT channel where they remain (mostly unviewed!) as a historical document. It was the friendliest music scene for miles around while it lasted and people still reminisce about it warmly.

Edited by Turned Out Nice Again

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That was a nice video, but fails to tackle the world's most important problems.

1) What shaving kit to buy

2) Male hair loss, and wigs

3) Cleaning Elton John's vinyl

4) Who has the most elaborate coffee machine

5) Watching the "news" and believing there is some.

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Gavin McInnes addressed similar issues when he started "The Proud Boys".  He said that the US had been founded by and been a nation of what were essentially social clubs and that had been steadily disappearing with consequent fragmentation of society.

You may remember Mr Cunningham's Grand Order of Buffalo in Happy Days; it wouldn't be referenced if it didn't exist.

This was his attempt to restart one to bring back a form of society that had been around for hundreds of years but only recently disappeared.

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2 minutes ago, the gardener said:

I belong to a tribe - the Roman Catholic tribe. We have our own community, we meet every week in a purpose-built location and we even build and run our own schools for the children of our tribe.

 

Yes, the church is still the centre of a community in some places. My gran had so many pictures of popes, it put me off  a bit.

Still, I have a small "tribe" and they are my mates, and they are few.

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8 hours ago, whitevanman said:

Do you have a tribe? I'd be interested if anyone on here feels that they do, I certainly don't and feel very much poorer for it. Technology and modern life seem to conspire against the creation of strong, interlinked and stable communities.


Do you not feel part of the Dosbods tribe?

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8 hours ago, whitevanman said:

Do you have a tribe? I'd be interested if anyone on here feels that they do, I certainly don't and feel very much poorer for it. Technology and modern life seem to conspire against the creation of strong, interlinked and stable communities. There just seems to be something 'off' about the way we live and I'm starting to believe that the supposed answers to our problems (more technology, more wealth, more welfare, more education) may just be the cause of those problems in the first place. 

The video below puts it better than I can.

Is there a way out? 

I think if you have managed without education, after 16, and without recourse to welfare you feel a bit left out of Modern Society. Possibly a lot of the northern Brexit backlash was about folk in places like Mansfield that hadn't benefitted on either count  just had to suffer trillions onto the National debt in their name. And had to put up listening to the entitled that had milked the system and were complaining for more free stuff.

Edited by crashmonitor

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I  noticed this trend begin with the downturn in pub use starting in the late nineties. Locally, especially friday after work, the village pub would be full of local people young and old from farm workers to bosses of national companies. They would all talk and things would get done. Twenty years later I doubt there are 10 people in there and don't know how the pub makes ends meet. I live and often work slightly off the beaten track and quite often go most of the week without speaking to a single person and had that pub still been worth going to (only used by alky mongs now), it would have been a valuable resource.

After a lifetime of not being very sociable, my retired boomer parents have become part of a boomer social circle (think they are mother's college associates from the sixties), but it seems very contrived and they don't seem to socialise outside of the allotted 'events'. Also a strong element of financial pissing contest. They know something is wrong but can't figure it out.

All good for those with the intention to control society. They must hate the internet getting people talking again.

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16 minutes ago, Caravan Monster said:

After a lifetime of not being very sociable, my retired boomer parents have become part of a boomer social circle (think they are mother's college associates from the sixties), but it seems very contrived and they don't seem to socialise outside of the allotted 'events'.


knit and natter. Locally is hugely popular with people of all ages. Mostly women. The odd one works (one comes on her lunch break when she's not away on conferences or meetings), but lots of women who don't work  because of ill health, age or children.

All this sexist crap about 'men in sheds' being essential as men are lonely - well women can be too and need to have easy ways of meeting people to chat to and socialise.

 

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2 minutes ago, sarahbell said:


knit and natter. Locally is hugely popular with people of all ages. Mostly women. The odd one works (one comes on her lunch break when she's not away on conferences or meetings), but lots of women who don't work  because of ill health, age or children.

All this sexist crap about 'men in sheds' being essential as men are lonely - well women can be too and need to have easy ways of meeting people to chat to and socialise.

 

there's nothing wrong with sheds.

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1 minute ago, MrPin said:

there's nothing wrong with sheds.

 No but the sexist attitude towards funding and loneliness for the last however many years 'men in sheds' has been going, has led to women being abandoned as if they never get lonely.
 

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33 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

Which joins us all together?

 

The list that Mi5 have. 

Once they start rounding us up we'll see how tribal we are. 

"who....... Never heard of them...... Somebodies must have cloned me and my email........ Owww not my testicle.....OK ok... I'll tell you what you want....... Spunko he's the leader.... I was brainwashed by them......... Actually I want to be a woman now and I identify as a Muslim......free to go?  Okay then. 

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1 minute ago, sarahbell said:

 No but the sexist attitude towards funding and loneliness for the last however many years 'men in sheds' has been going, has led to women being abandoned as if they never get lonely.
 

That is an interesting comment! Some "of the male species" here, seem to think they are being ridiculed in "shaving tat" adverts!

1 minute ago, Poseidon said:

The list that Mi5 have. 

Once they start rounding us up we'll see how tribal we are. 

"who....... Never heard of them...... Somebodies must have cloned me and my email........ Owww not my testicle.....OK ok... I'll tell you what you want....... Spunko he's the leader.... I was brainwashed by them......... Actually I want to be a woman now and I identify as a Muslim......free to go?  Okay then. 

Spunko is a "government mole", obviously, but which government?

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1 minute ago, MrPin said:

That is an interesting comment! Some "of the male species" here, seem to think they are being ridiculed in "shaving tat" adverts!

I think you have to always look for the angle.

For men in sheds - it's been charities collecting funding and buildings to 'further their aims'  but usually the funding goes where the research shows, so it's like people look for a new way of extracting funding/ There's usually buckets of money available to apply for but the themes change. 

Shaving tat companies want to sell loads of shit. Sometimes their ads will fail.  Most advertising is wanky shit. How many women when they're having a period actually want to dance about or go hand gliding. at least 10% will be hugging a hot water bottle

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I was talking about this only the other day with a friend of mine.  I had stumbled on some video clips of "Cheers" which I used to watch and enjoy years ago.  It is the interaction of a diverse mix of characters in a bar.  As some of you know I run a dance club and it hit me that my dance club had dopplegangers in "Cheers".  Chatting away in Timmies my friend, who is a dance club member, and I had a laugh matching up the dance club members with the "Cheers" show.  There were remarkable matches.  He is Norm and I am Sam and the character traits are remarkably close.  We even have our Carla who is such a close match it is sort of spooky. 

Our group is much larger than the Cheers group so we have even more bizarre characters but the basic notion is there.  We have fall outs and heated discussions but everyone keeps coming back and even though we all love dance it is blatantly obvious that we are there mostly for the social connection and the love of dance keeps us together through the rough bits.  Exactly like a family or a tribe.   Our tribe is open to all comers and all ages and is growing.  It is an important part of many lives and many friendships and many small sub groups form, like the wrecking yard gutter mechanics, who have female members and regail the rest of us with junk yard stories and more remote from ballroom dancing it would be hard to get but they fit in just fine and there are more couples that find each other at our dance club than you can shake a stick at and sometimes they drift away and sometimes they come back.  It is all very fluid but old members are always welcomed back. 

So, yes, I belong to a tribe and it is an important part of my life.  I am very happy to be the leader, father figure, but I encourage others to instruct too so the leader types get to have a go.  About a month or two ago one of these part time leaders introduced us to "Zorba" which is a Greek circle dance and it highlights the group social atmosphere.  We do Zorba holding hands in a circle and the feeling of belonging is intense.  Another is an old time tango dancer and he is popular too.  Remarkably to me the "kids" (ages about 20-25) love both Zorba and the tango and their energy encourages the rest of us. 

Belonging to a tribe is very important.  My dance club is an important part of many lives.   

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1 minute ago, Snow bird said:

I was talking about this only the other day with a friend of mine.  I had stumbled on some video clips of "Cheers" which I used to watch and enjoy years ago.  It is the interaction of a diverse mix of characters in a bar.  As some of you know I run a dance club and it hit me that my dance club had dopplegangers in "Cheers".  Chatting away in Timmies my friend, who is a dance club member, and I had a laugh matching up the dance club members with the "Cheers" show.  There were remarkable matches.  He is Norm and I am Sam and the character traits are remarkably close.  We even have our Carla who is such a close match it is sort of spooky. 

Our group is much larger than the Cheers group so we have even more bizarre characters but the basic notion is there.  We have fall outs and heated discussions but everyone keeps coming back and even though we all love dance it is blatantly obvious that we are there mostly for the social connection and the love of dance keeps us together through the rough bits.  Exactly like a family or a tribe.   Our tribe is open to all comers and all ages and is growing.  It is an important part of many lives and many friendships and many small sub groups form, like the wrecking yard gutter mechanics, who have female members and regail the rest of us with junk yard stories and more remote from ballroom dancing it would be hard to get but they fit in just fine and there are more couples that find each other at our dance club than you can shake a stick at and sometimes they drift away and sometimes they come back.  It is all very fluid but old members are always welcomed back. 

So, yes, I belong to a tribe and it is an important part of my life.  I am very happy to be the leader, father figure, but I encourage others to instruct too so the leader types get to have a go.  About a month or two ago one of these part time leaders introduced us to "Zorba" which is a Greek circle dance and it highlights the group social atmosphere.  We do Zorba holding hands in a circle and the feeling of belonging is intense.  Another is an old time tango dancer and he is popular too.  Remarkably to me the "kids" (ages about 20-25) love both Zorba and the tango and their energy encourages the rest of us. 

Belonging to a tribe is very important.  My dance club is an important part of many lives.   

Poof!xD

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