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Slug pellets to be banned


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For the veggie growers and farmers out there, the Metaldehyde based pellets are to be banned from next year.

I have used the Ferric phosphate pellets but don't have enough experience yet to confirm how effective they are. Putting aside the cost they are my preferred choice but will confess that a selective sprinkling of metadehyde pellets is used on certain crops at certain times of the year.

I might have a go with nematodes this year for the spuds.

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5 minutes ago, null; said:

For the veggie growers and farmers out there, the Metaldehyde based pellets are to be banned from next year.

I have used the Ferric phosphate pellets but don't have enough experience yet to confirm how effective they are. Putting aside the cost they are my preferred choice but will confess that a selective sprinkling of metadehyde pellets is used on certain crops at certain times of the year.

I might have a go with nematodes this year for the spuds.

Why?  Have they given a reason?  

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4 minutes ago, One percent said:

Why?  Have they given a reason?  

Metaldehyde ban in 2020 
In December 2018 DEFRA announced that metaldehyde will be banned from most uses in Spring 2020. The ban includes all home garden use. The decision followed advice from the UK expert committee on Pesticide and the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) who considered that metaldehyde poses an unacceptable risk to birds and mammals. Until the ban comes into force products containing metaldehyde continue to be used although they may become unavailable in the supply chain. Out of date products must be disposed of responsibly advice can be found here 

 

Not sure what the position is with Methiocarb, thats what the farmers I know use. I would suggest stocking up on Metalhyde if you use it, its curently around half the price of ferrous.

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2 minutes ago, null; said:

Metaldehyde ban in 2020 
In December 2018 DEFRA announced that metaldehyde will be banned from most uses in Spring 2020. The ban includes all home garden use. The decision followed advice from the UK expert committee on Pesticide and the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) who considered that metaldehyde poses an unacceptable risk to birds and mammals. Until the ban comes into force products containing metaldehyde continue to be used although they may become unavailable in the supply chain. Out of date products must be disposed of responsibly advice can be found here 

 

Not sure what the position is with Methiocarb, thats what the farmers I know use. I would suggest stocking up on Metalhyde if you use it, its curently around half the price of ferrous.

Ta. Off to sock up on slug pellets over the weekend. 

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You can get "organic" slug pellets, nematodes don't work very well in the open ground , only in pots. But they're expensive, better off IMO getting copper tape and wrapping it round the tops of the pots.

Getting some hens was the best solution for me, yes they crap everywhere but not a slug in sight.

Personally I never trusted these slug pellets with dogs etc. Good to see they're being banned IMO.

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Nemotodes work in open ground in my experience. But they are massively expensive to cover a lot of space.

I did a trial last year for them on my allotment. Also used previously in my garden. 

 

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On 13/02/2019 at 20:19, null; said:

Metaldehyde ban in 2020 
In December 2018 DEFRA announced that metaldehyde will be banned from most uses in Spring 2020. The ban includes all home garden use. The decision followed advice from the UK expert committee on Pesticide and the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) who considered that metaldehyde poses an unacceptable risk to birds and mammals. Until the ban comes into force products containing metaldehyde continue to be used although they may become unavailable in the supply chain. Out of date products must be disposed of responsibly advice can be found here 

 

Not sure what the position is with Methiocarb, thats what the farmers I know use. I would suggest stocking up on Metalhyde if you use it, its curently around half the price of ferrous.

Update - methiocarb was banned years ago, I guess the farmers must have accidently over ordered before the ban and running down their stockpile without realising the time limit for using up stock has expired.....

As for stockpling slug pellets I'm not sure how long they would last due to the cereal and yeast content. Probably still a number of years if kept dry.

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23 hours ago, sarahbell said:

Nemotodes work in open ground in my experience. But they are massively expensive to cover a lot of space.

I did a trial last year for them on my allotment. Also used previously in my garden. 

 

Haven't you got chickens though? Or am I getting confused.

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On 13/02/2019 at 20:04, null; said:

For the veggie growers and farmers out there, the Metaldehyde based pellets are to be banned from next year.

I have used the Ferric phosphate pellets but don't have enough experience yet to confirm how effective they are. Putting aside the cost they are my preferred choice but will confess that a selective sprinkling of metadehyde pellets is used on certain crops at certain times of the year.

I might have a go with nematodes this year for the spuds.

I built a pond in my garden and before that was invaded by slugs,woodlice etc.Now hardly ever see one,but i do see lots of fat frogs in the garden and pond.They are superb at keeping the slugs down,they eat the lot of them.I have never and will never use chemicals in my garden,and no need to.Put a small pond in,frogs do the rest.

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4 minutes ago, DurhamBorn said:

I built a pond in my garden and before that was invaded by slugs,woodlice etc.Now hardly ever see one,but i do see lots of fat frogs in the garden and pond.They are superb at keeping the slugs down,they eat the lot of them.I have never and will never use chemicals in my garden,and no need to.Put a small pond in,frogs do the rest.

Yes, I would like a pond but where I grow my veggies ponds are not allowed and it seems the badgers eat the hedgehogs which doesnt help.

I do use slug pellets at certain times for certain crops. I would prefer not to. I do keep their use to a complete minimum.

I expect that in the future the problem will be solved by small autonomus robot slug killers that patrol the veg patch by night.

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2 minutes ago, null; said:

Yes, I would like a pond but where I grow my veggies ponds are not allowed and it seems the badgers eat the hedgehogs which doesnt help.

I do use slug pellets at certain times for certain crops. I would prefer not to. I do keep their use to a complete minimum.

I expect that in the future the problem will be solved by small autonomus robot slug killers that patrol the veg patch by night.

Yes badgers are sods with hedgehogs.Shame no ponds,frogs are the best at it,they eat the lot.My close all had problems with them and woodlice getting in houses.Now zero problems,my frogs eat the lot .

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1 minute ago, DurhamBorn said:

Yes badgers are sods with hedgehogs.Shame no ponds,frogs are the best at it,they eat the lot.My close all had problems with them and woodlice getting in houses.Now zero problems,my frogs eat the lot .

I have fond childhood memories of the pond in our garden, used to love watching the tadpoles make the amazing change from spawn to tadpole to perfect minature frogs.

It was only recently that I learnt that badgers eat hedgehogs (everyday I learn something new), I was both surprised and disapointed. I was going to make some hedgehog dens but it seems pointless as no hedgehogs have been seen but the badgers are regular visitors and a bit of a pain as they dig holes everywhere. There are some slow worms and lizards but sadly they are in small numbers and rare, something that seemed abundant as a child. The foxes are interesting as they discard some very random objects, one buried a Father Chrismas shaped candle once, I assume it came from a bag of rubbish from the houses nearby.

There were adders at one time, I have never seen one in my life but would love to see one. I take most accounts of adders with a pinch of salt but one of the old boys tells me he found one in his compost heap and he is a knowledgeable enough guy that I believe him.

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Chewing Grass

I have selected two good posts below from this old R4 thread.

One saucer of beer placed in my garden catches and kills about thirty slugs a night....they are not very discerning, as lager seems to work just as well! I am told that milk works too, but have not yet tried it ...... so perhaps that left over cup of white coffee would be worth a go!! I sometimes find very tiny slugs queuing up trying to find an easy route into my saucer, these are easily helped with a cocktail stick.
Paul Rogers, Isle of Wight.

Slugs love bran but it kills them! I feed my garden birds with a plateful of porridge oats and bran each morning the birds eat the oats and at night all the slugs and snails have a feast on the bran. In the morning the birds eat all the dead slugs. A good bit of recycling?
Angela Morton.
 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/today/reports/archive/science_nature/slug_caffeine_mail.shtml

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22 hours ago, null; said:

I have fond childhood memories of the pond in our garden, used to love watching the tadpoles make the amazing change from spawn to tadpole to perfect minature frogs.

It was only recently that I learnt that badgers eat hedgehogs (everyday I learn something new), I was both surprised and disapointed. I was going to make some hedgehog dens but it seems pointless as no hedgehogs have been seen but the badgers are regular visitors and a bit of a pain as they dig holes everywhere. There are some slow worms and lizards but sadly they are in small numbers and rare, something that seemed abundant as a child. The foxes are interesting as they discard some very random objects, one buried a Father Chrismas shaped candle once, I assume it came from a bag of rubbish from the houses nearby.

There were adders at one time, I have never seen one in my life but would love to see one. I take most accounts of adders with a pinch of salt but one of the old boys tells me he found one in his compost heap and he is a knowledgeable enough guy that I believe him.

Adders can be seen in the Ashdown Forest, I haven't seen one but I've been told by reliable folk that they're still a common sight in summer. Don't know where you are in the UK but chalk/sandy places with gorse and low population density seem the best bet.

RE: slowworms my friend said he accidentally mowed one once, and it 'screamed'. :S

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  • 2 weeks later...

I just take a sledge hammer to them. A little bit of a problem if they make their way up the walls of a house or near the green house etc. but gets the job done with fantasic results.

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Happy Renting

I tried using slug pellets once, but it was too difficult to hit a slug with a pellet from 3 metres or more. And they just bounce off anyway.

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  • 1 month later...

I am delighted with this news. I run a hedgehog rescue and when they come in poisoned the death is slow and agonizing. I have tried nematodes in my own garden and they have been pretty good. And beer traps do work really well. The best way to get rid of slugs and snails remains hand picking unfortunately. Though of course on big areas this would be a big task (or impossible even).

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On 13/04/2019 at 07:05, happipixie said:

I am delighted with this news. I run a hedgehog rescue and when they come in poisoned the death is slow and agonizing. I have tried nematodes in my own garden and they have been pretty good. And beer traps do work really well. The best way to get rid of slugs and snails remains hand picking unfortunately. Though of course on big areas this would be a big task (or impossible even).

So does my wife (although it seems to consume rather a lot of my time too). Welcome to the forum.

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On 13/04/2019 at 07:05, happipixie said:

I am delighted with this news. I run a hedgehog rescue and when they come in poisoned the death is slow and agonizing. I have tried nematodes in my own garden and they have been pretty good. And beer traps do work really well. The best way to get rid of slugs and snails remains hand picking unfortunately. Though of course on big areas this would be a big task (or impossible even).

Hmmm...

 

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We had two hogs on the allotment recently. 

So is there some guidance on what to do with the old pellets? I don't want to tell people to hurry up and use them. Suspect putting a photo of the hedgehogs on site up might discourage their use.

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24 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

We had two hogs on the allotment recently. 

So is there some guidance on what to do with the old pellets? I don't want to tell people to hurry up and use them. Suspect putting a photo of the hedgehogs on site up might discourage their use.

Our local tip will take pesticides as long as they are in their original containers. You have to ask one of the blokes and hand them over, there isn't an obvious place to just put them. Check on your local council website, it should give details.

As an aside, garden netting is a big danger to hogs. They get tangled up in it and end up losing limbs or worse. It would be good if you can encourage people to put any that is not in use neatly away rather than leaving it lying around.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 17/02/2019 at 19:56, spunko said:

Adders can be seen in the Ashdown Forest, I haven't seen one but I've been told by reliable folk that they're still a common sight in summer.

Also common on the sand dunes at Rhosneigr on Anglesey.

Infact,  that's where the name comes from.. originally  Rhos Neidr   -  Snake moor in Welsh.

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