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Kurt Barlow

Redex fuel additive - it actually works!

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I started putting REDEX in my car at Xmas and have been really impressed with the improvement in fuel economy which has consistently been around 6% Fuel economy on our Auris Hybrid has gone from 51mpg to 54mpg 

I bought a bulk consignment from Amazon. 

I have calculated that for every pound spent on REDEX I get 3.16 back in fuel savings. 

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5 minutes ago, Kurt Barlow said:

I started putting REDEX in my car at Xmas and have been really impressed with the improvement in fuel economy which has consistently been around 6% Fuel economy on our Auris Hybrid has gone from 51mpg to 54mpg 

I bought a bulk consignment from Amazon. 

I have calculated that for every pound spent on REDEX I get 3.16 back in fuel savings. 

Was this a scientific experiment, did you take into account the mild February, my last 4 fills have gone 42.9, 42.5, 44.4, 50.7 first 2 Jan last 2 Feb with a good 100 mile motorway run on the last one.

Tread carefully.

Edit:- Diesel is an upper cylinder lubricant in itself and Redex looks exactly like 2-stroke oil (which is shit cheap).

Edited by Chewing Grass

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Just now, Chewing Grass said:

Was this a scientific experiment, did you take into account the mild February, my last 4 fills have gone 42.9, 42.5, 44.4, 50.7 first 2 Jan last 2 Feb with a good 100 mile motorway run on the last one.

Tread carefully.

We have had a real cold spell when the economy would have dropped to about 48mpg but we were getting 51mpg. 

We put the car in the Garage overnight so the car tends to not suffer the cold morning drop in fuel economy. 

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What makes me dubious is that, considering the relentless pursuit of fuel efficiency, surely a Gasoline company would add the Redex to it's product and promote it as a more effective and economical fuel.

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1 minute ago, Happy Renting said:

What makes me dubious is that, considering the relentless pursuit of fuel efficiency, surely a Gasoline company would add the Redex to it's product and promote it as a more effective and economical fuel.

Other fuel additives are added to the premium fuels on offer so this could well be the case. 

 

17 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Seconded; I put a slug in every three fill-ups or so.

It regularly goes on offer at Wilko at which point I buy lots.

Tip us off when they do because I get a 7.5% discount at wilko. Prefer to buy off them than Amazon. 

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4 minutes ago, Kurt Barlow said:

It cleans out all the fuel lines and injectors

5th Gear did some tests

 

OK, but do you need to use it occasionally, or all the time? If the latter I am sceptical.

 

7 minutes ago, Kurt Barlow said:

Other fuel additives are added to the premium fuels on offer so this could well be the case.

Is using Redex with these Premium fuels pointless then? Or does the Redex effect complement that of the fuel's additives?

 

Alternatively, can one get the full benefit of a Premium fuel by using the Premium fuel only occasionally?

Edited by Happy Renting

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6 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

OK, but do you need to use it occasionally, or all the time? If the latter I am sceptical.

 

Is using Redex with these Premium fuels pointless then? Or does the Redex effect complement that of the fuel's additives?

We use about 2/3rd of a tank of fuel a week (6.3 gallons)

I put the recommended shot of REDEX in after every other fill. 

On the second point possibly but then you will pay 10-11p a litre more. 

I routinely get 65mpg from our Auris whereas Mrs B would struggle to exceed 55mpg on the same journey. The reason is that she simply doesn't know the zone between flooring the accelerator and engaging the ABS9_9

Edited by Kurt Barlow

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25 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

What makes me dubious is that, considering the relentless pursuit of fuel efficiency, surely a Gasoline company would add the Redex to it's product and promote it as a more effective and economical fuel.

All the world's easily accessible supplies of Redex have been extracted already. It's an open secret that Saudi Arabia have been massively overstating the extent of their reserves for years now.

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I have some (slight) insight into the world of fuel additives, via former employment.

I cannot but conclude that, were they in any tangible sense effective, they would be bought out immediately by one of the oil majors.

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There wasa scandal about 30 years ago where Classic Car magazine tested a very well-known additive (I forget it's name) that was supposed to prevent valve seat wear even in unleaded fuels. The additive had been sold for decades.

It didn't. The damage to the engines under test due to valve seat wear was so bad the magazine stopped the test early. The additive promptly disappeared from the market, they had no evidence to back up their marketing claims.

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2 hours ago, Kurt Barlow said:

I started putting REDEX in my car at Xmas and have been really impressed with the improvement in fuel economy which has consistently been around 6% Fuel economy on our Auris Hybrid has gone from 51mpg to 54mpg 

I bought a bulk consignment from Amazon. 

I have calculated that for every pound spent on REDEX I get 3.16 back in fuel savings. 

It`s a finite game though as Redex is an injector cleaner once they are clean it`s never going to get any better to keep them clean for longer the cheapest way for non DI engines is to delete the EGR valve,,, diesels are a different ball game 

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1 hour ago, Ponty Mython said:

I have some (slight) insight into the world of fuel additives, via former employment.

I cannot but conclude that, were they in any tangible sense effective, they would be bought out immediately by one of the oil majors.

Ultra low sulphur diesel fuel has lower lubricity than old fashioned diesel. This causes extra wear in the fuel pumps, injectors and cylinders. To counter this the oil companies put additives into the fuel to bring the lubrication properties back into spec. You can add extra lubricity improvers to the fuel to improve things further, well worth doing for an older diesel that's designed to run on the old fuel. 

I don't know how much analysis and enforcement of fuel quality actually goes on. I suspect the government only cares about the sulphur level rather than the damage being done to engines by poor quality fuel.

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2 hours ago, Chewing Grass said:

Was this a scientific experiment, did you take into account the mild February, my last 4 fills have gone 42.9, 42.5, 44.4, 50.7 first 2 Jan last 2 Feb with a good 100 mile motorway run on the last one.

Tread carefully.

Edit:- Diesel is an upper cylinder lubricant in itself and Redex looks exactly like 2-stroke oil (which is shit cheap).

The warmer the weather the worse the fuel economy should be (if you exclude longer warm up period) as cold air is denser than hot air VE increases due to the denser air  ,it`s much more relevant in forced induction engines  

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11 minutes ago, whitevanman said:

Ultra low sulphur diesel fuel has lower lubricity than old fashioned diesel. This causes extra wear in the fuel pumps, injectors and cylinders. To counter this the oil companies put additives into the fuel to bring the lubrication properties back into spec. You can add extra lubricity improvers to the fuel to improve things further, well worth doing for an older diesel that's designed to run on the old fuel. 

I don't know how much analysis and enforcement of fuel quality actually goes on. I suspect the government only cares about the sulphur level rather than the damage being done to engines by poor quality fuel.

I have been told by a lab tech from a refinery that all this diesel plus stuff is bollocks in the main ,sit outside any refinery and you will see all sorts of tankers going in take Chevron in Pembroke you will see BP /Shell/ Esso /Tesco/ Morrisons etc   

Do Esso Stations in Scotland have there fuel delivered from Southampton (fawley is ESSO) when Grangemouth is down the road  and i`m pretty sure they don`t make a special bled for each customer 

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11 minutes ago, Long time lurking said:

 

 

The warmer the weather the worse the fuel economy should be (if you exclude longer warm up period) as cold air is denser than hot air VE increases due to the denser air  ,it`s much more relevant in forced induction engines  

Nah, in a petrol engine, the warmer the intake charge the less mass of air is being pumped by the engine and the less fuel needs to be added to maintain ideal combustion. This results in less power at any given revs at wide open throttle.

All engines, petrol or diesel, get better fuel economy in warmer weather. 

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4 minutes ago, Long time lurking said:

I have been told by a lab tech from a refinery that all this diesel plus stuff is bollocks in the main ,sit outside any refinery and you will see all sorts of tankers going in take Chevron in Pembroke you will see BP /Shell/ Esso /Tesco/ Morrisons etc   

Do Esso Stations in Scotland have there fuel delivered from Southampton (fawley is ESSO) when Grangemouth is down the road  and i`m pretty sure they don`t make a special bled for each customer 

Yeah, it's all the same stuff but apparently different companies add different additives. Not sure if that's true or not.

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3 minutes ago, whitevanman said:

Nah, in a petrol engine, the warmer the intake charge the less mass of air is being pumped by the engine and the less fuel needs to be added to maintain ideal combustion. This results in less power at any given revs at wide open throttle.

All engines, petrol or diesel, get better fuel economy in warmer weather. 

I’m not sure about economy but I think engines can produce more power when the intake air is cold. 

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3 minutes ago, whitevanman said:

Yeah, it's all the same stuff but apparently different companies add different additives. Not sure if that's true or not.

A mechanic recently advised me to avoid supermarket diesel, due to it having a higher biodiesel content.

I suspect Grangemouth diesel is all I’ll be getting, but there are maybe three or four grades of it. 

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11 minutes ago, whitevanman said:

Nah, in a petrol engine, the warmer the intake charge the less mass of air is being pumped by the engine and the less fuel needs to be added to maintain ideal combustion. This results in less power at any given revs at wide open throttle.

All engines, petrol or diesel, get better fuel economy in warmer weather. 

No it`s the other way around ,in your scenario there would be no need for inter coolers in petrol or diesel engines 

And the purpose of a MAF meter is to calculate the fuel air ratio virtually all modern engines work this way and they also use intake temps as part of that equation 

 

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5 minutes ago, Carl Fimble said:

I’m not sure about economy but I think engines can produce more power when the intake air is cold. 

Yes, cold air gives more power but worse fuel economy. 

Engines are just air pumps, the denser the air the more air they move and the more fuel they use. Putting is another way, as the air temperature goes up and down so does the effective capacity of your engine. Your 2L engine might behave like a 2.1L engine in cold weather and a 1.9L engine in warm weather. Altitude has the same effect.

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8 minutes ago, whitevanman said:

Yeah, it's all the same stuff but apparently different companies add different additives. Not sure if that's true or not.

Not from what i`m told or more this scenario Esso might do it in there refinery but all Esso garages don`t sell fuel made by Esso for the reason i made in my last post  

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