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spygirl

Happy OAP Equality day!!!!

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How nice it would have been to have equalised them at 60; given that they are one of the few benefits left that actually require contributions to be made.

A thank you from the state if you will; for your 35 years' of labour that have provided all the money that the government receives and which underpins its ability to borrow.

"Thank you taxpayer; you are the very foundation of this nation state and the reason we don't all starve to death and sleep in fields.  Through your labours we have been able to build houses, roads, ports, schools and hospitals.  You are the ultimate source of everything that is good about this country, your labours have built this country, so as a thank you from a grateful nation we are lowering the state pension age to 60."

In my dreams.

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9 minutes ago, Sugarlips said:

Still discrimination against men given they die much earlier than women

That's probably a direct result of working full time for forty years. 

Women are now having to do that as well so I expect the sex life expectancy gap to narrow; that's only my guess and I have nothing with which to back that assertion up.

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18 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

That's probably a direct result of working full time for forty years. 

Women are now having to do that as well so I expect the sex life expectancy gap to narrow; that's only my guess and I have nothing with which to back that assertion up.

my sex life expectancy dropped after we got married :(

Edited by snaga

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32 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Women are now having to do that as well so I expect the sex life expectancy gap to narrow; that's only my guess and I have nothing with which to back that assertion up.

It has narrowed but women still live longer

image.png.45dc1b3e726d96917f1cdb4bf8c104e5.png

Quote

Due to faster improvements in male mortality compared with females, the gap in life expectancy at birth for males and females in the UK has steadily reduced over time, decreasing from 6.0 years in 1980 to 1982 to 3.7 years in 2012 to 2014. Factors such as a reduction in the proportion of men smoking, the decline of heavy industry and the move away from physical labour and manufacturing industries towards the service sector are all possible contributors. Since 2012 to 2014, the gap between male and female life expectancy has remained at 3.7 years and females have continued to have higher life expectancy than males.

I wouldn't be surprised if it narrows further considering the obesity and drinking patterns of women.

Edited by maudit
figure

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2 minutes ago, maudit said:

It has narrowed but women still live longer

image.png.45dc1b3e726d96917f1cdb4bf8c104e5.png

I wouldn't be surprised if it narrows further considering the obesity and drinking patterns of women.

there will be a 15-20 year lead time before we see how later retirement affects female life expectancy.

Edited by snaga

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1 minute ago, maudit said:

It has narrowed but women still live longer

I wouldn't be surprised if it narrows further considering the obesity and drinking patterns of women.

I'm expecting it to narrow further owing to there being, for the first time ever, a lot of ?most women working full time jobs for thirty - forty years.  These mainly started working in the 80s so won't have hit their sixties yet so we're not seeing full life expectancy patterns from the first generation of women who have had to do this.

(I am aware that soem women have always worked full careers but when I have chatted about it with women at work in their forties / fifties their mothers pretty much all gave up full time work when they had a family and didn't return to it).    

4 minutes ago, snaga said:

there will be a 15-20 year lead time before we see how later retirement affects female life expectancy.

Hey, I typed out a longer answer saying the same thing!

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9 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

(I am aware that soem women have always worked full careers but when I have chatted about it with women at work in their forties / fifties their mothers pretty much all gave up full time work when they had a family and didn't return to it).    

 

You do hear stories of women in such as typing pools being basically booted out of the door the moment they got married.

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14 minutes ago, maudit said:

It has narrowed but women still live longer

image.png.45dc1b3e726d96917f1cdb4bf8c104e5.png

I wouldn't be surprised if it narrows further considering the obesity and drinking patterns of women.

That does look like it's levelling off at a time when they are increasing the state pension age 'because people are living longer'. As Frank said, with obesity and sedentary lifestyles replacing hard labour and smoking - we should see a rate of decline quite soon. I also expect once the Gen X'ers start reaching retirement (the first generation where women worked similar full time hours as men) we could see a rapid decline in women's mortality rate. No evidence - but I'll bet all my neighbours possessions that's what will happen. I'm pretty certain obesity is higher in women than men.

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5 minutes ago, TheNoSnowMan said:

No evidence - but I'll bet all my neighbours possessions that's what will happen. I'm pretty certain obesity is higher in women than men. 

Anecdotally my mum is in her 50s supposed to work for another 8 years IIRC, she gave up her last job as she needs to care for her father in France. In the last 2 years before giving up the job which was long hours and demanding she was getting problems with blood sugar control and passing out despite being thin. All stopped since she left with no other lifestyle changes.

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2 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

The victims of feminism are the very women with whom I work every day who have twenty or thirty years of full time work behind them, with another twenty or ten years to go.  Some with children some without.

Most of their mothers retired in their late twenties or early thirties.

If I was one of those women I would feel rather cheated.

I agree, the feminists have ruined things for most women. On this point I thought the study about stress was interesting
https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/working-mother-stress-work-full-time-job-pressure-children-family-study-a8749191.html

Quote

According to their findings, the overall levels of biomarkers associated with chronic stress are 40 per cent higher among women who have two children and are working full-time jobs, in comparison to women who have no children and are also working full-time.

Thought I would have been more interested to see the comparison with women with two children who were not working (haven't checked the paper they may have done this).

The stress reflects my experience trying to work with 2 children I was struggling to eat last year because I felt so stressed and constant guilt not having enough time for job or children.
 

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48 minutes ago, maudit said:

It has narrowed but women still live longer

image.png.45dc1b3e726d96917f1cdb4bf8c104e5.png

I wouldn't be surprised if it narrows further considering the obesity and drinking patterns of women.

Four years extra pension is a pretty hefty financial bonus. It adds up to about £30,000 more in monetary terms than most men receive.

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4 minutes ago, Virgil Caine said:

Four years extra pension is a pretty hefty financial bonus. It adds up to about £30,000 more in monetary terms than most men receive.

True maybe they should also do it by postcode, let the poor Glaswegians get their pension early.

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1 minute ago, maudit said:

True maybe they should also do it by postcode, let the poor Glaswegians get their pension early.

Or offer more but take it out of your estate when you die.

Poorer people could retire earlier - providing they drop dead.

I did notice LnG are reporting higher profits due to the fall off in life expectancy.

Every cloud ....

I expect UK life expetancy to drop quite a bit from now on.

Unlike their parents, boomers are bloaters, bingers etc.

And I also expect certain areas of the UK to have a huge problem re: housing and lack of buyers.

And not just the North.

 

 

 

 

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11 minutes ago, spygirl 🏆 said:

Or offer more but take it out of your estate when you die.

Poorer people could retire earlier - providing they drop dead.

I did notice LnG are reporting higher profits due to the fall off in life expectancy.

Every cloud ....

I expect UK life expetancy to drop quite a bit from now on.

Unlike their parents, boomers are bloaters, bingers etc.

And I also expect certain areas of the UK to have a huge problem re: housing and lack of buyers.

And not just the North.

 

 

Most of the new builds are timber framed and shoddily constructed so will just fall down of their own accord in twenty years' time; it saves on demolition costs.

 

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18 minutes ago, maudit said:

True maybe they should also do it by postcode, let the poor Glaswegians get their pension early.

Unskilled male manual workers used to have the worst deal from the old age pension. Many paid in for nearly 50 years yet many were  lucky to get 5 years payback. Prior to changes made by the Thatcher government women could qualify for widows pensions from the age of 50 if their husbands died. Women really have lost out from equalisation in this area of life which shows feminism was anything but a free lunch.

Edited by Virgil Caine

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4 hours ago, maudit said:

It has narrowed but women still live longer

image.png.45dc1b3e726d96917f1cdb4bf8c104e5.png

I wouldn't be surprised if it narrows further considering the obesity and drinking patterns of women.

Men’s life expectancy increasing faster than women’s? More evidence of male privilege. We need a campaign to address this.

 

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5 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

How nice it would have been to have equalised them at 60; given that they are one of the few benefits left that actually require contributions to be made.

A thank you from the state if you will; for your 35 years' of labour that have provided all the money that the government receives and which underpins its ability to borrow.

"Thank you taxpayer; you are the very foundation of this nation state and the reason we don't all starve to death and sleep in fields.  Through your labours we have been able to build houses, roads, ports, schools and hospitals.  You are the ultimate source of everything that is good about this country, your labours have built this country, so as a thank you from a grateful nation we are lowering the state pension age to 60."

In my dreams.

Well, the best way to do pensions is to offer the full state pension to citizen when they complete 40 years of NI contrib.

Everyone else can retire with x/40th of NI paying years from whatever SR age is.

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25 minutes ago, spygirl 🏆 said:

Well, the best way to do pensions is to offer the full state pension to citizen when they complete 40 years of NI contrib.

Everyone else can retire with x/40th of NI paying years from whatever SR age is.

I’ll agree to that. I currently have 45 years of full NI contributions! Still another five years to go for me for drawing a state pension though at age 66.

I’ve withdrawn from paying any tax or ni these days. If I were o be paid decently for my efforts I would reconsider but I’m not hopeful.

I wish society would have a serious debate about the role of males and females in society. For the record I believe that the sexes are different. Neither is better than the other they just have,IMO, different biological wiring.

Leaving that aside as a so called civilised society I would like to see debate on biological differences between the sexes and how we can best utilise them for the general good of society.

Also, I totally disagree with government policy raising state pension age access for all people. It’s not as if we inhabit a world where getting a fairly secure job is easy for anyone plus debilitating illness can strike at any age.

 A fair compromise would perhaps be access to state pension for all at age 63. Plenty of time to accrue the currently required 35 years NI contributions!

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Just now, Van Lady said:

I’ll agree to that. I currently have 45 years of full NI contributions! Still another five years to go for me for drawing a state pension though at age 66.

I’ve withdrawn from paying any tax or ni these days. If I were o be paid decently for my efforts I would reconsider but I’m not hopeful.

I wish society would have a serious debate about the role of males and females in society. For the record I believe that the sexes are different. Neither is better than the other they just have,IMO, different biological wiring.

Leaving that aside as a so called civilised society I would like to see debate on biological differences between the sexes and how we can best utilise them for the general good of society.

Also, I totally disagree with government policy raising state pension age access for all people. It’s not as if we inhabit a world where getting a fairly secure job is easy for anyone plus debilitating illness can strike at any age.

 A fair compromise would perhaps be access to state pension for all at age 63. Plenty of time to accrue the currently required 35 years NI contributions!

State pension should be seen as a reawrd from state to tax paying citizen.

Sooner uk moves to contrib benefits, the better.

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16 hours ago, spygirl 🏆 said:

State pension should be seen as a reawrd from state to tax paying citizen.

Sooner uk moves to contrib benefits, the better.

That's never going to happen. Too many of the rentier class rely on the government to pay their clients rent for them. And we saw what happened when Gideon even tried the tiniest of Tax Credit reforms. The Lords blocked it. Course they did - they're all fucking landlords...

The only way we'll ever get sensible economics back in this country is after a total financial collapse.

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17 hours ago, spygirl 🏆 said:

Well, the best way to do pensions is to offer the full state pension to citizen when they complete 40 years of NI contrib.

Everyone else can retire with x/40th of NI paying years from whatever SR age is.

Was going to say something similar, knock a year off retirement age for every 5 years of contribution.

Double benefit, mean those retiring at 60 might have covered (at least) some of that additional payment via their contribution and on the other side incentivise having a job, regardless of what it was.

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