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Chewing Grass

Vinyl Wrapping

Question

Been looking at various vinyls that can be used for wrapping for two reasons.

1) I'm getting a roof rack, gutter mounted (I know, very very retro) for new vehicle and am thinking of two-toning the vehicle with a gloss black roof and vinyl would also might stop me scratching the paint.

2) There seems to be great scope for wrapping all sorts of other things with curves and some of the films available look really interesting.

Anyone done it at home i.e. DIY wrapping.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Brushed-Aluminium-Vinyl-Wrap-Car-Air-Bubble-Free-All-Colours-All-Sizes/322053360233

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Looked at it, key I think is getting a good quality vinyl and plan ahead, access to the roof a little tricky but nice and flat, practice on something that is a little more curved than the roof to get a feel for how much heat to apply and how to manipulate and stretch the material, also technique and what to lay down/line up first.

I've used and applied sign writing vinyl  but that is a different beast altogether and involves none of the stretching / heating. it can be applied dry or with the surface wetted to allow it to slip round and into place - cannot remember whether that technique is applicable to the wrap vinyl at all. Get a decent squeegee as that make as that will make a big big difference (they generally come with a felt and plastic edge).

Edited by onlyme

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I've seen the results from a novice DIY attempt - not perfect but it did what was wanted. Warmer = better, and expect best results on gentle curved panels not sharp pointed corners (PM sent with link). Pics when done pls B| 

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1 hour ago, MrPin said:

This is a daft idea, as those with vinyl roofs in the 70s would know. Water gets under it and rusting ensues.:Old:

Those 70's vinyls were more akin to glueing upholstery material for your roof - porous in many cases either form the factory or not long after with a bit of UV degradation. These vinyls and sign wrapping vinyls are a different beast, very thin, very closely bonded to the surface and life at 5/7 years but often practically much longer. If anything they protect the paint too much, buy a sign written van in the wrong colour s/h and try getting the paint matching again can be a right pig as the old letter shows through from the heavily degraded exposed paintwork. Not uncommon for very expensive new cars to be wrapped to preserve their resale value as once the wrap is off the original paintwork is like new - the vinyl acts as stone chip, grazing, chemical and UV protection.

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8 hours ago, Happy Renting said:

If the vinyl is scratched or damaged would it be virtually impossible to touch up? Do you just wrap the panel again?

There is some TV series about a bloke who wraps cars with this stuff. It must be exciting TV.  9_9

A light surface scuff should be able to buff out a bit (it is a solid vinyl layer), otherwise replacement. Problem is like paint the pigments do degrade with sunlight so matching likely an issue.

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