• Welcome to DOSBODS

    Please consider creating a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

Sign in to follow this  
Frank Hovis

Boeing 737 MAX second crash

Recommended Posts

23 minutes ago, Snow bird said:

Usually yes (simulator) but Boing made the case that the max was just an upgrade of a 737 so special training was not needed.  A cost saving measure.  Should never have gotten past the FAA. 

 

Wasn't Canada Air 143 in 1983ish - the one that run out of fuel mid air - a flight of an 737 aircraft new to the pilots? I may be wrong

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 14/03/2019 at 23:33, 201p said:

 

The Eurofighter is inherently unstable in flight, which was deliberately designed so it is more manoeuvrable. However, it needs a computer to constantly adjust the canard wings so it remains stable in flight.

Can't believe they would put this kind of thing in passenger airliners just to eek out a bit of efficiency. The rewards just aren't outweighed by the risks here. 

image.png.93a34707738e2fa1b8d7fe8df7383bf1.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Happy Renting said:

My half-cousin,  GR67-P, used to fly Dakotas!  He was shit at it, though.

image.thumb.png.f224ce265cb8c6040c1b5da209df6487.png

Dakotas are exactly what I had in mind. Your cousin missed out on the Lego mvie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 13/03/2019 at 22:52, Happy Renting said:

You know when piots announce 'all crew to their landing positions'? That's called 'trim'.

Indeed it is. The flying laboratory at Cranfield is great and allows you to quantify it. Being the fattest bastard on my course, I got the honour of moving from the front row to back row mid-flight so that we could observe the required trim changes from the change in Centre-of-Mass position. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, spygirl 🏆 said:

200 hours flying for a first officer, avoid 3rd world airlines is my advice.

A couple of pilot friends say they get co pilots with 600 to 700 hours and they really  need a lot of supervision. They also said you get some pilots who are never any good, even with 10,000 hours. They can programme the autopilot but would be useless in an emergency.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Dave Bloke said:

200 hours flying for a first officer, avoid 3rd world airlines is my advice.

A couple of pilot friends say they get co pilots with 600 to 700 hours and they really  need a lot of supervision. They also said you get some pilots who are never any good, even with 10,000 hours. They can programme the autopilot but would be useless in an emergency.

Flying is like medicine.  There are a load of people who would be very good at it but don't even get to the interview, while there are a pile of others attracted to the lifestyle and income but that are absolutely crap at the actual job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Dave Bloke said:

200 hours flying for a first officer, avoid 3rd world airlines is my advice.

A couple of pilot friends say they get co pilots with 600 to 700 hours and they really  need a lot of supervision. They also said you get some pilots who are never any good, even with 10,000 hours. They can programme the autopilot but would be useless in an emergency.

If they don't get to co-pilot, how do they get the hours in the first place?

Edited by Happy Renting

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 15/03/2019 at 16:38, The Masked Tulip said:

 

Wasn't Canada Air 143 in 1983ish - the one that run out of fuel mid air - a flight of an 737 aircraft new to the pilots? I may be wrong

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gimli_Glider

Confusion over how much fuel was in there partially due to recent metrication. The good news is that no-one died.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

If they don't get to co-pilot, how do they get the hours in the first place?

Training courses. Acting as instructors themselves. Taking people on scenic flights. They work as pilots but doing stuff where they are not flying heavy aircraft with lots of passengers.

So they build up hours flying smaller aircraft whilst training to fly the bigger stuff. Training courses count towards hours. Hence why lots of pilots fork out a few hundred K to get trained.

Eventually a job opening becomes available flying Type A with Type X hours - Type A being a passenger aircraft but something smaller. If they they get the job then they can begin to built up hours but far quicker. If then wish they can carry on training for a different type - bigger aircraft - then they can. Things are easier if they are in a large airline with multiple types of aircraft and training to progress pilots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

Training courses. Acting as instructors themselves. Taking people on scenic flights. They work as pilots but doing stuff where they are not flying heavy aircraft with lots of passengers.

So they build up hours flying smaller aircraft whilst training to fly the bigger stuff. Training courses count towards hours. Hence why lots of pilots fork out a few hundred K to get trained.

Eventually a job opening becomes available flying Type A with Type X hours - Type A being a passenger aircraft but something smaller. If they they get the job then they can begin to built up hours but far quicker. If then wish they can carry on training for a different type - bigger aircraft - then they can. Things are easier if they are in a large airline with multiple types of aircraft and training to progress pilots.

+ simulator hours.

Simulator hours are particularly important for type ratings for commercial pilots.

[Lots of people don't rate simulator hours as they're 'not real', but simulators are actually very good (now) and that's where the pilot gets to practice the important stuff like engine out landings -- I'd suggest simulator hours are harder and 'worth more' than real flying.  But they've got to actually have real flying as well -- simulator isn't enough]

[Oh, and simulator flying is also important to practice flying new airports]

Edited by dgul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

If they don't get to co-pilot, how do they get the hours in the first place?

I guess on gliders and light planes then training. One pilot friend got his hours with the RAF flying troop transports.

Pilot friend flies and flew gliders in his spare time. A bit of a busman's holiday.

I must say it all looks fairly easy when things go well. Flaps down, luv!

 

Edited by Dave Bloke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

Training courses. Acting as instructors themselves. Taking people on scenic flights. They work as pilots but doing stuff where they are not flying heavy aircraft with lots of passengers.

So they build up hours flying smaller aircraft whilst training to fly the bigger stuff. Training courses count towards hours. Hence why lots of pilots fork out a few hundred K to get trained.

Eventually a job opening becomes available flying Type A with Type X hours - Type A being a passenger aircraft but something smaller. If they they get the job then they can begin to built up hours but far quicker. If then wish they can carry on training for a different type - bigger aircraft - then they can. Things are easier if they are in a large airline with multiple types of aircraft and training to progress pilots.

I meant hours on type, which I would expect only after many hours flying smaller planes and on a simulator.

Are they saying the co-pilot had ony 200 hours of flying in total?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

Training courses. Acting as instructors themselves. Taking people on scenic flights. They work as pilots but doing stuff where they are not flying heavy aircraft with lots of passengers.

So they build up hours flying smaller aircraft whilst training to fly the bigger stuff. Training courses count towards hours. Hence why lots of pilots fork out a few hundred K to get trained.

Eventually a job opening becomes available flying Type A with Type X hours - Type A being a passenger aircraft but something smaller. If they they get the job then they can begin to built up hours but far quicker. If then wish they can carry on training for a different type - bigger aircraft - then they can. Things are easier if they are in a large airline with multiple types of aircraft and training to progress pilots.

Seems to work for Indian IT ....

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.moonofalabama.org/2019/03/flawed-safety-analysis-failed-oversight-why-two-737-max-planes-crashed.html#more

pretty damning - FAA captured by Boeing

think reporting of aircraft crashes needs to be censored in future as it leads to lack of trust in government and regulators

Edited by ashestoashes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, ashestoashes said:

https://www.moonofalabama.org/2019/03/flawed-safety-analysis-failed-oversight-why-two-737-max-planes-crashed.html#more

pretty damning - FAA captured by Boeing

think reporting of aircraft crashes needs to be censored in future as it leads to lack of trust in government and regulators

So the AoA sensor is a vane type (as opposed to a pressure differntial type) according to that article. It would only take a bit of ice  or something to interfere with it's operation.

MCAS using only one is madness.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

So the AoA sensor is a vane type (as opposed to a pressure differntial type) according to that article. It would only take a bit of ice  or something to interfere with it's operation.

MCAS using only one is madness.

 

Saves money though. Apparently you can get a second vane if you cough up some more cash.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.