• Welcome to DOSBODS

     

    DOSBODS is free of any advertising.

    Ads are annoying, and - increasingly - advertising companies limit free speech online. DOSBODS Forums are completely free to use. Please create a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

     

Sign in to follow this  
The Masked Tulip

Credit card 3 digit security number question

Recommended Posts

I just rang up Green Flag to renew my breakdown cover - wanted to haggle as I had a better price elsewhere.

I got £10 off the renewal and the chap then asked for my credit card card number - as they were changing the price of the auto-renewal and he did not have access to my credit card details.

So I gave him the long number on the front of the card. He then asked for the 3 digit security number on the back which, after pausing, I reluctantly gave him. I queried him about it but he said it was normal.

Should I have done this? It has been so long since I gave my card to someone via the telephone and I do not recall giving the 3 digit security number before.

I rang barclaycard and spoke to a nice indian chap but he seemed stuck in thinking that I had done this online. He did check and said that Green Flag had just tried to put £1 through on the card but, bizarrely, that it had been declined because the 3 digital security code given by them was wrong.

Thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's normal. The tx won't go through without it. It's to prove you have ownership of the actual card, not just the card number in the same way as giving them the expiry date is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

I just rang up Green Flag to renew my breakdown cover - wanted to haggle as I had a better price elsewhere.

I got £10 off the renewal and the chap then asked for my credit card card number - as they were changing the price of the auto-renewal and he did not have access to my credit card details.

So I gave him the long number on the front of the card. He then asked for the 3 digit security number on the back which, after pausing, I reluctantly gave him. I queried him about it but he said it was normal.

Should I have done this? It has been so long since I gave my card to someone via the telephone and I do not recall giving the 3 digit security number before.

I rang barclaycard and spoke to a nice indian chap but he seemed stuck in thinking that I had done this online. He did check and said that Green Flag had just tried to put £1 through on the card but, bizarrely, that it had been declined because the 3 digital security code given by them was wrong.

Thoughts?

The £1 blag is said to be what scammers do to test the water so to speak ,unless the transaction agreed was for £1,i would be questioning how you spoke to and where you got that number from 

Seems iffy at best 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, NTB said:

It's normal. The tx won't go through without it. It's to prove you have ownership of the actual card, not just the card number in the same way as giving them the expiry date is.

£1 thought ,is that normal sounds a bit sus to me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is the 'card not present' number -- so you're supposed to give it whenever the vendor can't see the card.

The idea is meant to be that no-one records the code, so that even if the database of card transactions is lost/stolen, then crims can't use the card.  This, of course, is nonsense, both because vendors most definitely do store the code, and in that a three digit code isn't particularly robust.  There is also meant to be a benefit in that if you use your card for a normal (card present) transaction, then the vendor can't use that card later for an online/telephone purchase (as they don't know the security code).  This is equally nonsense.

IMO it came about because there was so much data loss in the banks in the 90's and there was rising amount of fraud because the crims had all the cardholder numbers and details -- the three digit code was an extra that the crims didn't have.  For about a second.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, dgul said:

It is the 'card not present' number -- so you're supposed to give it whenever the vendor can't see the card.

The idea is meant to be that no-one records the code, so that even if the database of card transactions is lost/stolen, then crims can't use the card.  This, of course, is nonsense, both because vendors most definitely do store the code, and in that a three digit code isn't particularly robust.  There is also meant to be a benefit in that if you use your card for a normal (card present) transaction, then the vendor can't use that card later for an online/telephone purchase (as they don't know the security code).  This is equally nonsense.

IMO it came about because there was so much data loss in the banks in the 90's and there was rising amount of fraud because the crims had all the cardholder numbers and details -- the three digit code was an extra that the crims didn't have.  For about a second.

 

Yes, just did a google and plenty of people are asking about it. It is apparently to confirm that you have the card in your hands and are not making it up. Does not sound secure to me as a bloke now has the security number. But plenty of people asking about it online. I just can't recall being asked for it before or perhaps I have been but it is so long that I have forgotten.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Asking for the number is usual but I don't know why they attempted to put through a £1 transaction, that's usually the MO of a scammer to check the card works. The fact that they put through the wrong number suggests a thick scamming employee. I'd ask your card provider to cancel the card and I would get in contact with Green Flag and ask to speak to their fraud department and find out whether the £1 is a SOP for them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Related to this, I recently bought something online and they didn't ask me for this 3-digit number. It's a service, not a physical product, and billed monthly. No mention of Direct Debit etc, is that likely to be what it is? It was via a company called Klarna (but not on credit).

Sorry to thread hijack.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Long time lurking said:

The £1 blag is said to be what scammers do to test the water so to speak ,unless the transaction agreed was for £1,i would be questioning how you spoke to and where you got that number from 

Seems iffy at best 

 

I have had plenty of £1 things in the past - Amazon, for example, is one who does this with stuff like Prime membership. It is a test of the card details before they bill you for something that involves an auto-renew... such as Amazon Prime, my breakdown cover or any subscription.

The £1 is then paid back within days and then they later charge you the bill amount.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, dgul said:

It is the 'card not present' number -- so you're supposed to give it whenever the vendor can't see the card.

The idea is meant to be that no-one records the code, so that even if the database of card transactions is lost/stolen, then crims can't use the card.  This, of course, is nonsense, both because vendors most definitely do store the code, and in that a three digit code isn't particularly robust.  There is also meant to be a benefit in that if you use your card for a normal (card present) transaction, then the vendor can't use that card later for an online/telephone purchase (as they don't know the security code).  This is equally nonsense.

IMO it came about because there was so much data loss in the banks in the 90's and there was rising amount of fraud because the crims had all the cardholder numbers and details -- the three digit code was an extra that the crims didn't have.  For about a second.

Never really understood the 3 digit security code - you can process a card payment over the phone without it.

 

When you make a card payment over the phone, in order to comply with PCI DSS, the organisation is supposed to pause any call recordings too.

For annual payments, they can use something called tokenisation, where a reference is used to take a repeat card payment instead of storing the actual card details.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remember back in the days when you'd go into a shop to buy something and they'd stick your card in a hand-operated machine with a multipart paper slip above it, pressing the embossed face into it to record the details?.

Apparently these were being stolen by the fistful from bins round the back of the shops so the idea was to provide an extra number that wouldn't be recorded on them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, spunko said:

Related to this, I recently bought something online and they didn't ask me for this 3-digit number. It's a service, not a physical product, and billed monthly. No mention of Direct Debit etc, is that likely to be what it is? It was via a company called Klarna (but not on credit).

Sorry to thread hijack.

Does Klarna hold this number? If it does then the company you have purchased from probably doesn't need to have that information? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Dipsy said:

Asking for the number is usual but I don't know why they attempted to put through a £1 transaction, that's usually the MO of a scammer to check the card works. The fact that they put through the wrong number suggests a thick scamming employee. I'd ask your card provider to cancel the card and I would get in contact with Green Flag and ask to speak to their fraud department and find out whether the £1 is a SOP for them.

 

I just rang them and they said that yes it is their standard policy.

They explained that they need the long card number on the front and the 3 digit security number on the back. NEVER give the pin they said.

They explained that the screen is muted - whatever that means - when a customer gives them the 3 digit security code meaning that no one can see or hear it. I don't have a clue what that means but I will take the lady's info as being kosha... Unless there is a massive corruption conspiracy at Green Flag...

So the only issue now seems to be the apprent rejection of the £1 by Barclaycard for the wrong 3 digit security number. Oh well, I assume Green Flag will ring me back if it is wrong. I was not that impressed with the Indian guy at Barclaycard for I am assuming that he has got things mixed up.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, The Masked Tulip said:

 

I just rang them and they said that yes it is their standard policy.

They explained that they need the long card number on the front and the 3 digit security number on the back. NEVER give the pin they said.

They explained that the screen is muted - whatever that means - when a customer gives them the 3 digit security code meaning that no one can see or hear it. I don't have a clue what that means but I will take the lady's info as being kosha... Unless there is a massive corruption conspiracy at Green Flag...

So the only issue now seems to be the apprent rejection of the £1 by Barclaycard for the wrong 3 digit security number. Oh well, I assume Green Flag will ring me back if it is wrong. I was not that impressed with the Indian guy at Barclaycard for I am assuming that he has got things mixed up.

 

That's good news. I suspect the employee mistyped the number when you gave it to them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, spunko said:

Related to this, I recently bought something online and they didn't ask me for this 3-digit number. It's a service, not a physical product, and billed monthly. No mention of Direct Debit etc, is that likely to be what it is? It was via a company called Klarna (but not on credit).

Sorry to thread hijack.

 

It could be that the automatice verification service that banks charge is too costly for them - eats into their profit. So they are perhaps doing a manual billing of the card front number when you fill in that number. It looks like an automatic transaction but perhaps involves someone reading a print-out somewhere and then manually entering the info.

 

2 minutes ago, Dipsy said:

That's good news. I suspect the employee mistyped the number when you gave it to them.

 

Probably. No doubt they will contact me in due course. All this to save a tenner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a mobile eftpos/card reader for business - I only need the ccv number when doing a transaction over the phone.

When you do a physical tap/swipe/insert of a card a pin is required.

I hope this clears everything up:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Dipsy said:

😁

 

It is the slow creep thing that I do not like. Firms raise your premium a bit each year and if you do not challenge it then you end up X years down the line paying a lot more than you should.

With that, my car insurance has gone up £50 so I have to get on to them, tell them about the rival quote I have for £50 less, haggle, probably settle on my premium going up £20 or £30.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

 

It is the slow creep thing that I do not like. Firms raise your premium a bit each year and if you do not challenge it then you end up X years down the line paying a lot more than you should.

With that, my car insurance has gone up £50 so I have to get on to them, tell them about the rival quote I have for £50 less, haggle, probably settle on my premium going up £20 or £30.

I have heard that, if you start getting alternative insurance policy quotations well in advance of your renewal time,  you can get far better prices. I intend to try that out, about 6 weeks before my car insurance renewal is due.

Edited by Happy Renting

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Happy Renting said:

I have heard that, if you start getting alternative insurance policy quotations well in advance of your renewal time,  you can get far better prices. I intend to try that out, about 6 weeks before my car insurance renewal is due.

 

That's what I do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

 

It is the slow creep thing that I do not like. Firms raise your premium a bit each year and if you do not challenge it then you end up X years down the line paying a lot more than you should.

With that, my car insurance has gone up £50 so I have to get on to them, tell them about the rival quote I have for £50 less, haggle, probably settle on my premium going up £20 or £30.

They take existing customers for mugs. Used to be insured with Direct Line for the cars. One year premium went up by 25%, so I got a new customer quote, surprise, surprise much cheaper. Called them and asked to speak to their customer retention team, they couldn't give me a coherent explaination for the difference in price (obviously they weren't going to admit that they were trying to rip me off). Anyway after tying up their staff on the call for a few more minutes I told them I wasn't going to renew. Ended up with even cheaper cover elsewhere. I always shop around every year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dipsy said:

They take existing customers for mugs. Used to be insured with Direct Line for the cars. One year premium went up by 25%, so I got a new customer quote, surprise, surprise much cheaper. Called them and asked to speak to their customer retention team, they couldn't give me a coherent explaination for the difference in price (obviously they weren't going to admit that they were trying to rip me off). Anyway after tying up their staff on the call for a few more minutes I told them I wasn't going to renew. Ended up with even cheaper cover elsewhere. I always shop around every year.

 

Direct Line guy refused point blank to give me any discount. Didn't even ask me for the rival quote or a company. So I suspect he had no intention of competing.

Then tried to sell me Direct Line breakdown cover - which is Green Flag - for £20 more than I just renewed with Green Flag.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Dipsy said:

They take existing customers for mugs. Used to be insured with Direct Line for the cars. One year premium went up by 25%, so I got a new customer quote, surprise, surprise much cheaper. Called them and asked to speak to their customer retention team, they couldn't give me a coherent explaination for the difference in price (obviously they weren't going to admit that they were trying to rip me off). Anyway after tying up their staff on the call for a few more minutes I told them I wasn't going to renew. Ended up with even cheaper cover elsewhere. I always shop around every year.

i did this one year with a broker(hastings), they sent me a price to renew with the same underwriter, +20% over last year, so i went on confused.com and did a fresh new quote to find a cheaper one, same details, same car, lo- the same underwriter came up via hastings direct but same price as last year, i just bought that one instead and binned the renewal, even though it was exactly the same. Bunch of wankers ripping off loyal customers and offering maybe loss leaders to new punters.

They tried it again the year after, but i just went elsewhere that was cheaper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, The Masked Tulip said:

I just rang up Green Flag to renew my breakdown cover - wanted to haggle as I had a better price elsewhere.

I got £10 off the renewal and the chap then asked for my credit card card number - as they were changing the price of the auto-renewal and he did not have access to my credit card details.

So I gave him the long number on the front of the card. He then asked for the 3 digit security number on the back which, after pausing, I reluctantly gave him. I queried him about it but he said it was normal.

Should I have done this? It has been so long since I gave my card to someone via the telephone and I do not recall giving the 3 digit security number before.

I rang barclaycard and spoke to a nice indian chap but he seemed stuck in thinking that I had done this online. He did check and said that Green Flag had just tried to put £1 through on the card but, bizarrely, that it had been declined because the 3 digital security code given by them was wrong.

Thoughts?

Yep - it is fine provided the ppeople you are giving it to are trustworthy. They cannot take payment without it - the card validation code or cvc.

They will also need obviously the card number and the expiry date. They will usually ask for your postcode and house number as these number digits means the bank charge less money to process the transaction if these match too but they are not critical to a successful transaction like the others.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I carry a "police mans" oh sorry "police persons" notebook, and record the date and amount transacted, IMMEDIATELY after use and reconcile when the bill is due.

This is pretty robust and I will be hot on anyone pilfering money. 

I've had to give a 3 digit code sometimes, and do ask is it safe - of course they say it's safe, but there's nothing stopping the operator jotting the stuff down.

Make sure you are calling a legit business using a legit number.

Think would you give a 3 digit number to an Indian call centre operative?

(You are racist if you don't)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.