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One percent

Bloody Sunday.

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-47540271

A former British soldier faces murder charges over the killing of two people on Bloody Sunday in Londonderry in 1972.

The Public Prosecution Service said there was enough evidence to prosecute Soldier F for the murders of James Wray and William McKinney.

The sole prosecution is seen as a "terrible disappointment" by some of the families of the 13 people killed.

They were shot dead at a civil rights march on 30 January 1972.

The day became known as Bloody Sunday - one of the darkest days of the Northern Ireland Troubles.

 

not passing comment as I don’t know enough. We do that have a strong norn Irish contingent on here. 

Discuss. 

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Just now, One percent said:

Can hardly forget it if the establishment drag it back up and through the courts 

You cannot "kipper" a soldier for doing his duty!:o

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As was complained about in the news: why is similar effort not being put into seeking out and bringing to court those guilty of unsolved terrorist murders in NI?

Could it perhaps be that it is much easier to prosecute British soldiers whose identities and actions are known to the authorities because they were acting under their orders?

There is no fairness or equity; merely bashing the soft targets.

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12 minutes ago, One percent said:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-47540271

A former British soldier faces murder charges over the killing of two people on Bloody Sunday in Londonderry in 1972.

The Public Prosecution Service said there was enough evidence to prosecute Soldier F for the murders of James Wray and William McKinney.

The sole prosecution is seen as a "terrible disappointment" by some of the families of the 13 people killed.

They were shot dead at a civil rights march on 30 January 1972.

The day became known as Bloody Sunday - one of the darkest days of the Northern Ireland Troubles.

 

not passing comment as I don’t know enough. We do that have a strong norn Irish contingent on here. 

Discuss. 

You can’t possibly get a fair trial, in a politically motivated show trial 46 years after the events. Our “justice system” is done for.

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2 minutes ago, Hail the Tripod said:

You can’t possibly get a fair trial, in a politically motivated show trial 46 years after the events. Our “justice system” is done for.

The words ‘dry’ ‘hanging’ out’ spring to mind 

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22 minutes ago, One percent said:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-47540271

A former British soldier faces murder charges over the killing of two people on Bloody Sunday in Londonderry in 1972.

The Public Prosecution Service said there was enough evidence to prosecute Soldier F for the murders of James Wray and William McKinney.

The sole prosecution is seen as a "terrible disappointment" by some of the families of the 13 people killed.

They were shot dead at a civil rights march on 30 January 1972.

The day became known as Bloody Sunday - one of the darkest days of the Northern Ireland Troubles.

 

not passing comment as I don’t know enough. We do that have a strong norn Irish contingent on here. 

Discuss. 

distraction story while the irish border is under discussion.

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I don't know much about that day, if the marchers weren't carrying weapons were the soldiers actions any different to those of the Police toward the Gilet Jeunes that we condemn?

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8 minutes ago, Dipsy said:

I don't know much about that day, if the marchers weren't carrying weapons were the soldiers actions any different to those of the Police toward the Gilet Jeunes that we condemn?

Well there’s a difference between the culpability of the rank and file and those giving the orders for the overall big picture events.

As for the detail of specific individual crimes, can you really untangle that kind of hyper partisan  chaos nearly 50 years later with any hope of achieving truth beyond reasonable doubt?

This will be like the version of “innocent until proven guilty” showcased in Rolf’s trial: if you can’t definitively prove that you weren’t even in the city that day...

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3 minutes ago, Hail the Tripod said:

Well there’s a difference between the culpability of the rank and file and those giving the orders for the overall big picture events.

As for the detail of specific individual crimes, can you really untangle that kind of hyper partisan  chaos nearly 50 years later with any hope of achieving truth beyond reasonable doubt?

This will be like the version of “innocent until proven guilty” showcased in Rolf’s trial: if you can’t definitively prove that you weren’t even in the city that day...

Good point there. It is never those who were issuing orders that find themselves on charges. Always the working class squaddy who if he didn’t follow the orders at the time would have found himself court-martialled. 

damned  if you do, damned if you don’t kind of scenario. 

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1 hour ago, MrPin said:

You cannot "kipper" a soldier for doing his duty!:o

I served with the Airborne forces and Bloody Sunday was discussed many a late night in the mess. 1 Tom managed to discharge 13 rounds, when he had only been issued with 10. This is symptomatic of a loss of control. 

Those guys didn’t know the ground, were unclear on their mission, and as alluded to above, we’re out of control. So yes there’s accountability at an individual level, but the command & control team should be beside Trooper F in the dock.

 I hope my actions overseas are never reviewed in 40 years time against the prevailing values and norms or I may also be in trouble...

Edited by Horrified Onlooker
Clarity

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5 minutes ago, One percent said:

Good point there. It is never those who were issuing orders that find themselves on charges. Always the working class squaddy who if he didn’t follow the orders at the time would have found himself court-martialled. 

damned  if you do, damned if you don’t kind of scenario. 

But you can't use the "I was only obeying orders" defence. Concentration camp guards learnt that. If you can't be clear as to what happened 50 years ago than the prosecution fails. I'm not saying it's fair to single this soldier out but is there a point back in history where we say, no you can't prosecute the crime it's too far back?

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1 minute ago, Great Guy said:

I bet the average WW2 squaddie did similar in WW2. The "troubles" were a low level civil war, I think you have to judge the paratroopers against soldiers in a war zone....

 

You can't really retrospectivy impose the morals of a peacetime onto a war zone/1

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