• Welcome to DOSBODS

     

    DOSBODS is free of any advertising.

    Ads are annoying, and - increasingly - advertising companies limit free speech online. DOSBODS Forums are completely free to use. Please create a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

     

Sign in to follow this  
spunko

DOSBODS Book Club

Recommended Posts

I read a fair amount, but never fiction - just not my thing really, more interested in political science/commentary/history/plays, but we all have varied tastes.

The current book I'm reading is Our Culture, What's Left of It by Dalrymple. I saw PJW mention him in one of his videos and picked up a used copy off eBay for a few quid. A brilliant book but utterly depressing as well - this summary saves me the effort of typing out my review:

Dalrymple has, it must be stressed, written an urgent, important, almost an essential book. Our Culture, What's Left of It needs to be read and acted on by policy-makers, by opinion-formers, and anyone who wants to grasp why Britain has become so much less pleasant a country in which to live. The book is elegantly written, conscientiously argued, provocative and fiercely committed... His measured polemics arouse disgust, shame and despair: they will shake many readers' views of their physical surroundings and cultural assumptions, and have an enriching power to improve the way that people think and act.

--

He comes across as a bit didactic at times but I'd recommend all DOSBODers give it a whirl. I love a book that makes you think, and shake the foundations of what you think is true. He's written shit loads of books so will be trying out a few more soon.

Can any DOSBODers recommend similar books that they've read with these kinds of themes? Some related books I read before it (by Raheem Kassam, Milo, Jordan Peterson) I found to be a bit basic but enjoyed nonetheless.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the recommendation.

For something a bit more foundational, I recommend "Plutarchs parallel lives". Its a classic in which a Roman author compares one of his (relative) contemporaries with a classical Greek. In it you will find the start of many major political themes and ideologies (ie collectivism and Lycurges)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read almost exclusively non-fiction, mainly accounts of sports, science or space exploration.

The one book that made me re-think how the world works was "No One Would Listen" by Harry Markopolos.

It is the story of how the Bernie Madoff Ponzi scheme was uncovered.  Markopolos was tasked by his bosses to work out how Madoff was getting such high returns so that they could copy him.  Initially, Markopolos couldn't understand how Madoff could be making so much money, and concluded that Madoff's business was fraudulent.  When Markopolos eventually uncovered proof, no one would believe him as Madoff was so well respected.  It took about another 10 years for Madoff's scheme to collapse.

Now for the scary part.  This book made me realise that the ownership of all assets is just an opinion, usually based on a database of some sort.  Whilst an asset may be physical, the record of the ownership of that asset is just information.  If the relevant authorities conclude that information is wrong, you have nothing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My reading tends to be 3 parts Sci-fi/Fantasy to 1 part Sci-fact/Self Improvement.

On the recent non-fiction side I found "Incognito: The secret Lives of the Brain" by Neuroscientist David Eagleman to be a fascinating read. I was surprised to find it actually left me feeling a little more compassionate toward my fellow human being.

I like his idea that there is no 'real you' but rather a democracy of competing thoughts that whirl around inside your mind before reaching a consensus. So for instance, you're not necessarily showing your true colors when you're drunk, instead the author suggests that the more moderate voices in your consciousness become subdued during this time leaving the radicals to have their way. Anyway, it's packed with lots of insights that build upon each other leading to his conclusions on the present state of crime and punishment in the modern world and what changes he would like to see - I couldn't disagree tbh. Highly recommend (although fair warning - some of it was a bit gruesome, eg I was not familiar with the term 'Hemispherectomy' before reading this book!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, goldbug9999 said:

Thats why we invented bitcoin

I think you've slightly missed my point due to me not being specific enough.  I wasn't just referring to physical assets that are primarily a store of wealth (perecious metals, hard cash, works of art etc.), but also to useful physical assets such as cars, and in particular, property.  That's what I find truly scary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.