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One percent

She don't lie, she don't lie, she don't lie... Cocaine

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-suffolk-48117678

Scientists found cocaine in freshwater shrimps when testing rivers for chemicals, a study said. 

Researchers at King's College London, in collaboration with the University of Suffolk, tested 15 different locations across Suffolk.

Their report said cocaine was found in all samples tested. Other illicit drugs, such as ketamine, were also widespread in the shrimp.

The researchers said it was a "surprising" finding.

 

Looks like times are good in Suffolk. 

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They make an unconventional drugs mule, but up until now no-one was looking at them.  I suppose the route will be taken over by the trout now.

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They must be injecting it like Sherlock Holmes. Or else what? They get their dealer to line it for them on the shore then stick their heads out of the water to snort it. I don't think so. 

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50 minutes ago, The Grey Man said:

https://news.sky.com/story/amp/cargo-ship-seized-in-philadelphia-after-20-tonnes-of-cocaine-discovered-on-board-11759199

Biggest coke haul in US customs history.

Thats 20 tonnes worth of marching powder.

...

That's about 1% of global production, and about 5% of the annual cocaine consumption for the USA+Canada -- the haul might have an impact on prices in the North East USA.  

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1 hour ago, unregistered_guest said:

So, is that good or bad for GDP?

Ha!

[answer is that it is complicated -- should go up, but not by much -- for a 'party drug' like coke it is more like there's a limited (very big) sum of money for the stuff, so as prices go up demand will start to drop -- essentially people will either cut down on partying or move to a substitute, but whichever they choose, the same amount of money will be spent on partying.   The second order effect is that 'partying hard affects productivity' (hangovers, etc), but partying will take anything that's there (alcohol, drugs, whatever) anyway, so the productivity effect isn't very big.   'addiction drugs' (heroin) are slightly different but there's the same end first-order result -- as the price goes up people continue to buy it but in that instance they spend less in other areas of the economy to support a constant demand, so the same 'overall expenditure' (all their money) in total, ie no change in GDP.  Second order effects for 'addiction drugs' are very complicated (eg, does GDP go up if there are a pile of drugs ridden dossers hanging around, and then a pile of people running around after them cleaning up needles, sorting out healthcare, etc -- the 'drugs' equivalent to 'paying people to dig holes and then fill them in again', ie, GDP is a stupid measure for the economic output of a country]

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7 hours ago, dgul said:

That's about 1% of global production, and about 5% of the annual cocaine consumption for the USA+Canada -- the haul might have an impact on prices in the North East USA.  

Yes. But isn't it a Just In Time Business model. 

Everyone's going to be hanging for about a week, until the next shipment gets through. God knows what effect it will have. 

I'm sure the 2007/8 banking crisis was caused by a large shipment getti g impounded on its way to London. 

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, Poseidon said:

Yes. But isn't it a Just In Time Business model. 

Everyone's going to be hanging for about a week, until the next shipment gets through. God knows what effect it will have. 

 

Not much effect -- say someone is desperate to party and the cost of their coke goes from £50 to £100 (for eg) -- some will substitute to keep partying (they spend £50 on something else) , some will pay up but will have to buy less in the following weeks (capital constraints ie, £100 spent,  -£50 spent elsewhere in the economy), some will just not participate, but will have money to spend in the following weeks (ie, £0 spent, +£100 spent elsewhere in the economy). 

There'll be second order effects, but the main impact won't be as simple as 'demand before x increase in price'.

Edited by dgul

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Interestingly, I was in a Mcdonalds late at night, in London, and there were some chatty coppers in and I asked them what they thought the best way to solve knife crime would be and their thoughts on the solution were that people should stop buying drugs.

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13 minutes ago, SNACR said:

Interestingly, I was in a Mcdonalds late at night, in London, and there were some chatty coppers in and I asked them what they thought the best way to solve knife crime would be and their thoughts on the solution were that people should stop buying drugs.

That's a facile argument.  Anyway, what they actually meant was 'stop buying drugs from the bad people'.  And the problem with that argument is 'how else would people find their drugs?'

One of the best ways to control 'people giving money to bad people' would be to decouple the benign drugs market from the bad drugs market, and the best way to do that would be via controlled decriminalisation, particularly of cannabis.

As it stands about 10% of the UK population (20% for youngsters) took some cannabis in the last 12 months, and a good proportion of those will have interacted with someone that could get hold of anything if asked.  If those 10%-20% didn't meet 'bad people' it would have a massive impact on those 'bad people's' ability to market other stuff.  And that would have a massive impact on knife crime.

[Short answer -- if you want to know about crime ask a policeman.  if you want to know about how to stop crime ask anyone else.]

 

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5 minutes ago, dgul said:

That's a facile argument.  Anyway, what they actually meant was 'stop buying drugs from the bad people'.  And the problem with that argument is 'how else would people find their drugs?'

One of the best ways to control 'people giving money to bad people' would be to decouple the benign drugs market from the bad drugs market, and the best way to do that would be via controlled decriminalisation, particularly of cannabis.

As it stands about 10% of the UK population (20% for youngsters) took some cannabis in the last 12 months, and a good proportion of those will have interacted with someone that could get hold of anything if asked.  If those 10%-20% didn't meet 'bad people' it would have a massive impact on those 'bad people's' ability to market other stuff.  And that would have a massive impact on knife crime.

[Short answer -- if you want to know about crime ask a policeman.  if you want to know about how to stop crime ask anyone else.]

 

It's not an argument they're essentially stating that most knife crime is drug related.

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1 minute ago, SNACR said:

It's not an argument they're essentially stating that most knife crime is drug related.

No -- that would have been them saying 'most knife crime is drugs related'.  That's my 'if you want to know about crime ask a policeman'.  They actually said 'their thoughts on the solution were that people should stop buying drugs', and I'd say my point stands ' if you want to know about how to stop crime ask anyone else'.

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2 minutes ago, dgul said:

No -- that would have been them saying 'most knife crime is drugs related'.  That's my 'if you want to know about crime ask a policeman'.  They actually said 'their thoughts on the solution were that people should stop buying drugs', and I'd say my point stands ' if you want to know about how to stop crime ask anyone else'.

I'd give you the benefit of the doubt originally but it sounds like you want to delude yourself buying drugs isn't fuelling more serious violent crime.

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7 minutes ago, SNACR said:

I'd give you the benefit of the doubt originally but it sounds like you want to delude yourself buying drugs isn't fuelling more serious violent crime.

Oh, I'd absolutely agree with the correlation between drugs and crime.  And it's getting worse (IMO).

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