• Welcome to DOSBODS

    Please consider creating a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

Sign in to follow this  
Libspero

Atomic Pi

Recommended Posts

I seem to remember there used to be a few Raspberry Pi enthusiasts on here,  some might be interested to know they have released a new high power version of their SBC, the Atomic Pi.

Incidentally at almost exactly the same time as the Lattepanda Alpha has been released..  so quite a few of these powerful SBCs coming into the market at the moment.

Quite like the idea of playing with these..  just not really sure what people do with them.  Or how.

Any original Pi users still find they use them?  What do you do with them?   How easy is it to learn how to use arduino etc?  Any thoughts on these new boards?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Arduino is pretty interesting. It's something I wish was available when I was only a teenager. The development environment lis a limited form of C, and it is not difficult. I do have one somewhere.

1 minute ago, The Masked Tulip said:

I built a Time machine and saved Humanity... once again.

You shouldn't let on, as it will change history.:CryBaby:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RetroPi and a 256GIG image of just about every videogame ever up to a certain point.

Be interesting to see if these new boards can emulate 3D consoles any better i.e. N64 and up, though I bought a NVIDIA shield for that purpose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use my Raspberry Pi as my company web server. Always on and costs next to nothing in power consumption. I also had a spell of nostalgically keying in Basic games from old Beebug magazines until I found out that the Inkey function didn't work on the Basic interpreter on Raspian. Apparently there is/was a proper BBC Basic implementation but you need to boot the Pi up with RiscOS or something. I will try it one day...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Arduino platform is great for learning bit bashing and low level sensor / simple control interfacing and you can be up and flashing LED's and interfacing in minutes from install.

Raspberry PI - more conventional software dev.

Got a Brennan audio server running on a PI and projects to do but no time, will be the base for security system eventually. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, onlyme said:

Arduino platform is great for learning bit bashing and low level sensor / simple control interfacing and you can be up and flashing LED's and interfacing in minutes from install.

Raspberry PI - more conventional software dev.

Got a Brennan audio server running on a PI and projects to do but no time, will be the base for security system eventually. 

Will you let me hack it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Raspberry pi (etc) are fantastic -- they're essentially a disposable computer -- ie, cheap enough to try out and if you muck it up (lose it, short it, blow it up, stolen) it's no great loss.

I like the idea of a much more powerful version, because it expands the use case by quite a bit.  That said, the real problem with Rasperry Pi is the gulf in performance (or flexibility or ease of use) comparing the cheap SBCs and the more capable microcontrollers.  It would be useful if Pis had a workable low power (sleep) mode as well.

Arduino are also great, but much more limited.  The problem with Arduino is that they're not sufficiently powerful for many use cases (where the Pi is overkill).

I've moved to ESP32 & STM32 for PoC systems as they're as usable/simple/flexible/cheap as Arduino, but are much more powerful (eg, can do FFT reasonably quickly), and have the usual microcontroller stuff (low power, proper sleep modes, etc) compared with a Pi.

Edited by dgul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, JoeDavola said:

RetroPi and a 256GIG image of just about every videogame ever up to a certain point.

Be interesting to see if these new boards can emulate 3D consoles any better i.e. N64 and up, though I bought a NVIDIA shield for that purpose.

I was looking to upgrade my android/Linux boxes to the Odroid N2 

https://www.odroid.co.uk/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=868

obviously more expensive, the atomic Pi looks like a good bang for your buck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Sideysid said:

I was looking to upgrade my android/Linux boxes to the Odroid N2 

https://www.odroid.co.uk/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=868

obviously more expensive, the atomic Pi looks like a good bang for your buck

Yeah the Odroid is a great machine, it was difficult to get when I first heard of it and then the NVIDIA shield was available on sale for about £130 so I snapped one up - think it's the last emulation box I'll ever need.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, dgul said:

Raspberry pi (etc) are fantastic -- they're essentially a disposable computer -- ie, cheap enough to try out and if you muck it up (lose it, short it, blow it up, stolen) it's no great loss.

I like the idea of a much more powerful version, because it expands the use case by quite a bit.  That said, the real problem with Rasperry Pi is the gulf in performance (or flexibility or ease of use) comparing the cheap SBCs and the more capable microcontrollers.  It would be useful if Pis had a workable low power (sleep) mode as well.

Arduino are also great, but much more limited.  The problem with Arduino is that they're not sufficiently powerful for many use cases (where the Pi is overkill).

I've moved to ESP32 & STM32 for PoC systems as they're as usable/simple/flexible/cheap as Arduino, but are much more powerful (eg, can do FFT reasonably quickly), and have the usual microcontroller stuff (low power, proper sleep modes, etc) compared with a Pi.

What do you use FFT for?

Last time I implemented FFT was in Basic on an HP 85A microcomputer (256 samples of an 8-bit waveform).

It wasn't exactly, um.., real-time. It had to be left to run overnight and then output the transform on an XY plotter.

It was still enough to impress the octogenarians who ran the N*mr*d avionics test rig. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, JoeDavola said:

Yeah the Odroid is a great machine, it was difficult to get when I first heard of it and then the NVIDIA shield was available on sale for about £130 so I snapped one up - think it's the last emulation box I'll ever need.

You young whippersnappers and your fancy high-falutin' new-fangled  gadgets....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Karl Denninger of the market-ticker I believe used his Pi to develop some kind of home-hub security thing that unlike the big names doesnt spy on you, put all your personal info onto the cloud/someone elses server etc.

 

Give him a million dollars or something and he'll send you all the details. O.o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Libspero said:

Any original Pi users still find they use them?  What do you do with them?   How easy is it to learn how to use arduino etc?  Any thoughts on these new boards?

Not used my original Pi for some time - too slow compared to my Pi 2. Tend to write stuff in Python to run on a small screen using a mini wireless keyboard to communicate with it. Had thought I'd do more with the GPIO pins, but as others have said; for a small project, I'm more likely to quickly put together something with one of my Arduino boards. The Leonardo will emulate a mouse or keyboard, so you can write on one platform and plug into another to display data captured in real time.

A lot of the stuff I did earlier was pretty trivial, to get the BotLets interested - BotLet #2 still has an Arduino-powered nightlight which automatically switches on when it gets dark. BotLet #1 used them for fancy dress costumes and IB coursework....

As for the Arduino IDE - it's 'sort-of' based on Processing, and has a 'C-like'  feel to it. Plenty of code examples and libraries out there to learn from and use.

But if Scratch-like block-based user-interfaces are more your sort of thing, you might want to look at Snap4Arduino.

As for new boards. Got hold of a 101 some time back - but I'm far more likely to use a Leonardo or Uno in a project.  The other new boards don't appeal to me as I don't attempt projects that would need the extra features they offer. Will probably invest in a Pi 3 at some point if only to compare performance with my Pi 2 - but will wait until a suitable project idea emerges that would mean having one in use all the time. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Happy Renting said:

What do you use FFT for?

Signal filtering -- all done in frequency domain.   

2 hours ago, Happy Renting said:

What do you use FFT for?

Last time I implemented FFT was in Basic on an HP 85A microcomputer (256 samples of an 8-bit waveform).

It wasn't exactly, um.., real-time. It had to be left to run overnight and then output the transform on an XY plotter.

I've got three hp85s in the attic.    Not used them since the 90's, but they're built like battleships so I'd imagine they'd turn on if I tried.

The ESP32 is doing 512 sample FFT in realish time (2khz or so).

Arduino was slow (and only had enough memory for 128 sample, and I had to use the Fast Hartley Transform, which is similar-but-worse, but is faster and more memory efficient). 

Rasperry Pi did FFT in the GPU and was over 1000 times faster than I needed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, PatronizingGit said:

Karl Denninger of the market-ticker I believe used his Pi to develop some kind of home-hub security thing that unlike the big names doesnt spy on you, put all your personal info onto the cloud/someone elses server etc.

 

Give him a million dollars or something and he'll send you all the details. O.o

 

I use several in various rooms as media players (Kodi) and for gaming (mostly using RetroPie).  I plugged old web cams into them and using Motion they become security cameras.

Then I set up Home Assistant which pings my phone so when I go out it knows I'm not there and switches the security cameras on automatically.  Next I got it to switch the lights on if I'm home and it's dark and I'm not watching a movie.  Now I've mostly gone back to using light switches because it got too weird.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Atomic Pi is cheap because it's being built from parts for an OEM order for a company that abandoned their project.

It's Intel architecture though -- so support will be good. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Sideysid said:

I was looking to upgrade my android/Linux boxes to the Odroid N2 

https://www.odroid.co.uk/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=868

obviously more expensive, the atomic Pi looks like a good bang for your buck

The problem is that ODroid N2 uses a 4.9 kernel. Mainline is not there yet; but RPF are tracking upstream aggressively.

AMLogic S922x is a pig in terms of heat. We rejected it as a SoC for our next product because the A73s end up throttled very easily. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, unregistered_guest said:

Tend to write stuff in Python

 

Does it not bend when you press down on it?

Edited by eight

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.