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The UK.1976. Heatwave

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Personally, if I could go back to one year again, it would be 1976. If you can forget the Pervy cameraman (and make no mistake, the guy is a real perv), notice how few people were obese at that time.What happened to this country? And yes, the women were absolutely gorgeous.

 

Edited by Tabasco Kid

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Re: obesity. I wonder how selective the cameraman is though as the world of 1976 seems to be populated by mostly childless women with nice boobs who are aged 35 or less. 

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34 minutes ago, Tabasco Kid said:

Watching this, I have realised that I am a 100% ass-man.

New Orleans! I've never seen so much big black ass squeezing out of hot pants, unless you count the film that Mr Renting never got returned to him.

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2 hours ago, SCC said:

Re: obesity. I wonder how selective the cameraman is though as the world of 1976 seems to be populated by mostly childless women with nice boobs who are aged 35 or less. 

He's very selective but there is the odd non-woman who walk into the frame.

Shocking really. Its like we've all been infected by some sort of fat disease.

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I didn't know Benny Hill was an amateur film maker.

What a summer, who knew that ladybirds bit you?

There were only two fat kids at school and it was regarded as a medical problem; one if not both were put in hospital on a strict diet to monitor their metabolic rate and run tests.

I wonder what the response would be now if someone took their child to the doctor requesting that they be hospitalised because they're fat; it would probably make the papers.

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Quite something that.

That cameraman would be bloody lynched these days, no doubt about it. 

Everyone looks pretty healthy and relatively happy, stark contrast to now to be honest. The last time I drove through Blackpool on a summers day was shocking, it was like driving through a Heronymous Bosch painting with an added greasy sheen and chips. 

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Wow. (Ignoring the pervy shots) watching that is like looking at a world which you kind of know, but you cant grasp, like trying to remember a dream. Tha abscence of sound accentuates the dreamlike quality.

I remember that summer quite well, although I was only a kid, playing endless cricket, swimming in the river, playing tennis in the park - happy days...

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I remember that summer very well. The summer of the hot pants. The film looks like rushes that a cameraman has taken having been sent out to get lots of shots of hot pants and tops for some item on what to wear during the heatwave. But yes, he would be on a list today.

On the hottest day in 1976, which was the hottest day in the UK in the 20th Century up until then, a SAS officer died in a freak blizzard on the Brecon Beacons.

 

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3 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

I remember that summer very well. The summer of the hot pants. The film looks like rushes that a cameraman has taken having been sent out to get lots of shots of hot pants and tops for some item on what to wear during the heatwave. But yes, he would be on a list today.

On the hottest day in 1976, which was the hottest day in the UK in the 20th Century up until then, a SAS officer died in a freak blizzard on the Brecon Beacons.

 

You're not thinking of Mike Kealey who died in 79 are you:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Kealy

I know they do lots of their training in the Brecons.

The Brecons stick in my memory for the driving wind and horizontal rain that breached my rucksack's waterproofing meaning that I had to climb fully dressed into a cold wet sleeping bag in the hope that it might warm up enough that I could get some sleep.

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Nice biit of camerawork at 9 minutes. Tracks the woman walking to and past the camera. Nice tilt down from her top to her bottom at the same time.

I recall the heat was so oppressive and there were lots of stories on the TV about how to stay cool and much ado that women were going braless to try and keep cooler. Hot pants, braless ladies, heat and attractive British women.

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2 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

You're not thinking of Mike Kealey who died in 79 are you:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Kealy

I know they do lots of their training in the Brecons.

The Brecons stick in my memory for the driving wind and horizontal rain that breached my rucksack's waterproofing meaning that I had to climb fully dressed into a cold wet sleeping bag in the hope that it might warm up enough that I could get some sleep.

 

Nope.

The Beacons are taken for granted by so many. You can dehydrate rapidly up there at any time of the year. People have died of thirst on them. Heat-stroke is another killer. The driving rain, as you say, just gets into everything. I can still feel the wet of soaking wet clothing.

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1 minute ago, The Masked Tulip said:

 

Nope.

The Beacons are taken for granted by so many. You can dehydrate rapidly up there at any time of the year. People have died of thirst on them. Heat-stroke is another killer. The driving rain, as you say, just gets into everything. I can still feel the wet of soaking wet clothing.

I think you need to be cold, wet and lost in the dark on mountains a few times to really appreciate just how exposed you are out there, it's not something that you can be taught.

I had heat stroke once, lovely sunny day in the Lakes, gentle slopes, beautiful walking, didn't drink enough water.  It's a mistake you only make the one time.

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37 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I think you need to be cold, wet and lost in the dark on mountains a few times to really appreciate just how exposed you are out there, it's not something that you can be taught.

I had heat stroke once, lovely sunny day in the Lakes, gentle slopes, beautiful walking, didn't drink enough water.  It's a mistake you only make the one time.

Yes, had the heatstroke myself one. Now people wonder why I am very wary of the heat and sunshine.

I used to take loads of chocolate digestives and plain digestives for the Beacons. I always knew that things were bad when I eventually got to the plain - yuck - digestives.

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27 minutes ago, MrPin said:

Dehydration is a real problem. Please take a drink with you. Even in the UK.

You might be very right, Mr P, but I have the opposite problem -- the UK schooling system has made my children into paranoid idiots, demanding copious quantities of water for even the shortest journey.  I try to explain that they'd be likely to survive a couple of hours walking around the shops without constantly rehydrating, but they fall into a thirsty heap after 30 minutes and can't go on.  At school they get special bottles so that they can rehydrate themselves in class, and special water fountains for filling them.  At least they haven't discovered the magical qualities of isotonic rehydration, and seem happy with old-fashioned water.

It wouldn't be so bad if they gave them occasional lessons in being ever so slightly dehydrated (and perhaps slightly hungry as well, which is a similar problem).

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Well Mr Dgul, during my short "holiday" in Pakistan, we always took a crate of bottled water, in the truck, because you might get stuck out there overnight if the road collapsed. I agree that drinking too much makes you pee a lot.

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