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One percent

I’m depressed

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35 minutes ago, One percent said:

Well not me but alistair Campbell on bbc 2 at 9pm.  I’m not sure if the focus is on him being depressed or him depressing the rest of us. 

Im not planning on watching it to find out. Way too depressing. 

He's still living, unlike several 100 UK squaddies and several 10k of Ayrabs.

 

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1 minute ago, One percent said:

Well you clearly survived. What could be worse?  

Oh wait, the kids are coming home.  Commiserations. 

Nearly. I am actually looking forward to that.

I will take this to the other side.

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15 minutes ago, One percent said:

Dunno, he has bliar and mandleslime 

If I found them sitting on my sofa, drinking my beer, and I realised that they were my only friends, I ‘d be straight on the phone to Dignitas. And no, I am not making light of suicide....

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1 minute ago, Horrified Onlooker said:

If I found them sitting on my sofa, drinking my beer, and I realised that they were my only friends, I ‘d be straight on the phone to Dignitas. And no, I am not making light of suicide....

We don't call it suicide anymore. Do keep up.

(I think it is now called self extinguishment or some such bollocks)

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4 minutes ago, Horrified Onlooker said:

If I found them sitting on my sofa, drinking my beer, and I realised that they were my only friends, I ‘d be straight on the phone to Dignitas. And no, I am not making light of suicide....

I repped you but I have a slight issue with this as you should at least try to take them with you, willing or not. 

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1 hour ago, Rowley said:

I work in construction and for the last couple of years "mental health" has been 'on trend'. People wittering on, trying to out-do each other with stories of their own personal struggles and conquests.

Rather than reducing depression and anxiety, I suspect it has vastly increased it - and we will never know how many extra cases are genuine and how many chancers are trying it on.

Look after your fitness, diet, have a couple of decent friends / family members, and a hobby you enjoy, and happiness will be your lifelong friend

Spot on. All talking about it in public does is make more people feel depressed. Go and see a specialist FFS.

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I think the vast majority of the newly depressed are of the look at me variety. 

Not all, but most. 

Why ? Because it's another badge on the arm in the Scout movement version of modern life. 

All I read about is the "stigma" of mental health. Seriously ? It appears a bona fide badge of honour these days. 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, dgul said:

For some reason the latest trend is to think that the way to fight depression is to go on and on and on and on and on about it.

There's a brilliant quote by Theodore Dalrymple that I thought I would share. Bearing in mind he was a GP for many years.

There is something to be said here about the word "depression," which has almost entirely eliminated the word and even the concept of unhappiness from modern life. Of the thousands of patients I have seen, only two or three have ever claimed to be 'unhappy': all the rest have said that they were depressed. This semantic shift is deeply significant, for it implies that dissatisfaction with life is itself pathological, a medical condition, which it is the responsibility of the doctor to alleviate by medical means. Everyone has a right to health; depression is unhealthy; therefore everyone has a right to be happy (the opposite of being depressed). This idea in turn implies that one's state of mind, or one's mood, is or should be independent of the way that one lives one's life, a belief that must deprive human existence of all meaning, radically disconnecting reward from conduct.

A ridiculous pas de deux between doctor and patient ensues: the patient pretends to be ill, and the doctor pretends to cure him. In the process, the patient is willfully blinded to the conduct that inevitably causes his misery in the first place. I have therefore come to see that one of the most important tasks of the doctor today is the disavowal of his own power and responsibility. The patient's notion that he is ill stands in the way of his understanding of the situation, without which moral change cannot take place. The doctor who pretends to treat is an obstacle to this change, blinding rather than enlightening.

 

Edited by spunko

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To an extent I envy those that can become truly miserable.

I think we are programmed to have a wave chart. I can go from mildly grumpy to a touch pleased. Others can go from euphoric to fucking miserable.

Because I can never experience an absolute low, ergo I can't get a total high.

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Maybe I am being reductive but I see depression in terms of being an existential binary. Death is a somewhat sad but inevitable end to the happy person's life. To the depressive it is a potential solution. To me, if someone hasn't had a good old think about the logistics of doing themselves in then they are not suffering from depression. 

Anxiety runs on a similar binary but is associated with the fear of death rather than the act itself. If you haven't had a proper panic attack where you think you are about to die imminently then you do not have anxiety.

Sometimes people get a bit down, a bit sad, and they worry about stuff. These things are completely different to depression and anxiety.

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24 minutes ago, spunko said:

There's a brilliant quote by Theodore Dalrymple that I thought I would share. Bearing in mind he was a GP for many years.

There is something to be said here about the word "depression," which has almost entirely eliminated the word and even the concept of unhappiness from modern life. Of the thousands of patients I have seen, only two or three have ever claimed to be 'unhappy': all the rest have said that they were depressed. This semantic shift is deeply significant, for it implies that dissatisfaction with life is itself pathological, a medical condition, which it is the responsibility of the doctor to alleviate by medical means. Everyone has a right to health; depression is unhealthy; therefore everyone has a right to be happy (the opposite of being depressed). This idea in turn implies that one's state of mind, or one's mood, is or should be independent of the way that one lives one's life, a belief that must deprive human existence of all meaning, radically disconnecting reward from conduct.

A ridiculous pas de deux between doctor and patient ensues: the patient pretends to be ill, and the doctor pretends to cure him. In the process, the patient is willfully blinded to the conduct that inevitably causes his misery in the first place. I have therefore come to see that one of the most important tasks of the doctor today is the disavowal of his own power and responsibility. The patient's notion that he is ill stands in the way of his understanding of the situation, without which moral change cannot take place. The doctor who pretends to treat is an obstacle to this change, blinding rather than enlightening.

 

Superb, thank you for that. Unfortunately I suspect the English used would be incomprehensible to a high percentage of even native English speakers. 

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23 minutes ago, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

Superb, thank you for that. Unfortunately I suspect the English used would be incomprehensible to a high percentage of even native English speakers. 

That's in English?

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5 hours ago, Bedrag Justesen said:

Then die in Caergwrle.

 

 

 

 

*Traditional North Wales expression of the futility of life.

My mum liked to use that 'joke'. (It always needs to be explained tho! :D)

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7 hours ago, Wight Flight said:

To an extent I envy those that can become truly miserable.

I think we are programmed to have a wave chart. I can go from mildly grumpy to a touch pleased. Others can go from euphoric to fucking miserable.

Because I can never experience an absolute low, ergo I can't get a total high.

I view life as buying a music album. It is something that people don't experience today, which society is missing. 

You buy a music album because there are some songs in there that you want to hear. You pick it up in the shop, and look at the shiny case, and look at the back. It is a magical experience as you have to sit through it to know if you are going to like some of the music. Some song are sads, some are happy. You have to listen to the sad ones, to enjoy the happy ones better. In the days of pre-CD and pre-remote control you didn't have the luxury of skipping the ones you like.

I think the more we have everything at our fingertips, the sadder we will become. Before we had the anticipation, and the waiting. I believe in the not so-far future where we are close to knowing everything, and having access to everything, that will be the end. This is referenced in the 4th Indiana Jones film, the Crystal skull, where the villianess is gifted all universe knowledge by the aliens, but that becomes the end of her.

---

Some peoples wave forms are very wide - some go very happy, some go very sad. Some are very flat - with no emotions.

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6 hours ago, blobloblob said:

If I told a bunch of lies and it led to several hundred thousand deaths I might feel a little bit down.

Yes, in Campbell's case he is reaping what he sowed.

The diagnosis of depression seems vague, is it being down or something more fundamental?

I still clearly remember waking in the middle of the night in about 1989 and feeling, for no reason whatever, absolutely bleak, shattered, terrible. The feeling began to fade and I did eventually fall asleep and when I woke I was absolutely fine but had the very clear memory of it which has stayed with me.

I can only put it down to some transient chemical imbalance in the brain; I haven't had it before or since.

When people say they have depression and it's that then I don't know how they can carry on, but if it's general unhappiness then yes all the self help advice applies.

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7 hours ago, blobloblob said:

If I told a bunch of lies and it led to several hundred thousand deaths I might feel a little bit down.

I doubt he has any remorse, he still has that smug surety that he knows better than everyone else. He’s just bitter that everyone else knows and it impairs his ability to manipulate them.

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