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Ponty Mython

Tesco organic chicken

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Had the dubious pleasure of visiting Tesco today (25% off 6 bottles of wine being the driver); I was instructed to purchase chicken thighs for dinner. Selected the "organic" range, as the likely best of standard, free-range and organic. Fucking disgusting, they were. Sainsbury's free-range is pretty rank too, best of the bunch is Waitrose corn-fed (25% off this week).

I felt like I needed a shower after 20 minutes in Tesco too.

What is going on?

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1 minute ago, Ponty Mython said:

Had the dubious pleasure of visiting Tesco today (25% off 6 bottles of wine being the driver); I was instructed to purchase chicken thighs for dinner. Selected the "organic" range, as the likely best of standard, free-range and organic. Fucking disgusting, they were. Sainsbury's free-range is pretty rank too, best of the bunch is Waitrose corn-fed (25% off this week).

I felt like I needed a shower after 20 minutes in Tesco too.

What is going on?

They treat their staff like shit, so no-one gives a toss any more.

And their suppliers too.

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I avoid Tesco at all cost, their own brand stuff was the pits 10 years ago when I was unfortunate to have to use one.

Their cakes were produced in a mahoosive factory that also supplies IIRC Asda/Sainsburys/M&S at the time it was commonly known  that the Tesco ones were made with the shittest/cheapest ingredients.

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I get my meat from Riverford, very good quality, particularly the beef. Expensive when compared to supermarket organic, but I'd rather eat less meat and have better quality.

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5 hours ago, Ponty Mython said:

Had the dubious pleasure of visiting Tesco today (25% off 6 bottles of wine being the driver); I was instructed to purchase chicken thighs for dinner. Selected the "organic" range, as the likely best of standard, free-range and organic. Fucking disgusting, they were. Sainsbury's free-range is pretty rank too, best of the bunch is Waitrose corn-fed (25% off this week).

I felt like I needed a shower after 20 minutes in Tesco too.

What is going on?

If you can find them, Breton corn-fed chickens from Janze are very good.

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I avoid Tesco's as It think their well-documented business practises towards many of their suppliers is absolutely shithouse. I know some people who had dealings with them on that front and I think it's fair to say they wouldn't give Tesco's the steam off their piss...though if there were a few quid in it, Tesco's would have demanded that too.

On the food quality front, especially when it comes to meat, I find most supermarkets range from average to shite. Stewing beef, for example, seems to take about double the time to cook to an edible consistency than stuff you'd get from the butchers.

I got a leg of lamb from Morrisions a while back and I have no idea what was going on with it but it tasted absolutely disgusting and was completely inedible. I'm no expert but instinct as soon as I took a bite told me it was on the edge of rotten.

:Sick1:

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12 hours ago, Dipsy said:

I get my meat from Riverford, very good quality, particularly the beef. Expensive when compared to supermarket organic, but I'd rather eat less meat and have better quality.

This is where we `need to go` regarding meat eating and public education...the result would be a) less diet based health issues, and b) less global warming due to methane emissions...unfortunately this doesn't suit multinational food suppliers/outlets, and so would never become a policy promoted by government.

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4 hours ago, MrXxx said:

This is where we `need to go` regarding meat eating and public education...the result would be a) less diet based health issues, and b) less global warming due to methane emissions...unfortunately this doesn't suit multinational food suppliers/outlets, and so would never become a policy promoted by government.

I don't disagree but how do we actually know this means it's better quality or better for us?

This may or may not be the same across the country but I regularly hear down here the drum being banged about local produce, locally sourced meat, farmers' markets and so on.  All of which we're verbally assured means higher quality therefore we have to pay more for it.

I however don't see why the beef from a cow in Cornwall is intrinsically better for me than that from a cow from the Ukraine or Argentina; and given that it's local that means lower transportation costs so why isn't it cheaper instead of being more expensive?

It just comes across as a marketing scheme to get people to pay more for an identical product by branding it with meaningless words like "quality" and "wholesome".

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Posted (edited)

I buy wild salmon as part of my weekly Sainsbury's online shop - specifically wild salmon; it's more expensive but looks and tastes different to farmed. I don't want to eat farmed salmon.

Went to do my meal prep this week and found out they'd fucking given me farmed and still charged me for wild. I'm gonna email them giving off and ask for a refund, trying to fob me off like that...

Edited by JoeDavola

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17 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I don't disagree but how do we actually know this means it's better quality or better for us?

This may or may not be the same across the country but I regularly hear down here the drum being banged about local produce, locally sourced meat, farmers' markets and so on.  All of which we're verbally assured means higher quality therefore we have to pay more for it.

I however don't see why the beef from a cow in Cornwall is intrinsically better for me than that from a cow from the Ukraine or Argentina; and given that it's local that means lower transportation costs so why isn't it cheaper instead of being more expensive?

It just comes across as a marketing scheme to get people to pay more for an identical product by branding it with meaningless words like "quality" and "wholesome".

See also 'organic'. A word that's basically been utilised to add an extra fiver on to whatever it is that's been labelled as such.

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8 minutes ago, JoeDavola said:

I buy wild salmon as part of my weekly Sainsbury's online shop - specifically wild salmon; it's more expensive but looks and tastes different to farmed. I don't want to eat farmed salmon.

Went to do my meal prep this week and found out they'd fucking given me farmed and still charged me for wild. I'm gonna email them giving off and ask for a refund, trying to fob me off like that...

There is a clear distinction between farmed and wild salmon and you are able to identify that and are prepared to pay extra for it.  Which is fair.

There are plenty of other examples such as pasties from a local baker for a fiver being superb but "traditional" pasties from Lidl at three for £1.50 being awful; all the ingredients are minced together into a mushy paste. However if Lidl did a luxury £5 pasty I have no doubt that it would be superb.

These are the extremes though.

More usually it is a shop trying to charge me 20% for an absolutely identical product because it is local or, as Sarge said, "organic".

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1 hour ago, Sgt Hartman said:

See also 'organic'. A word that's basically been utilised to add an extra fiver on to whatever it is that's been labelled as such.

If it's from the UK then organic standards are very strict if you look them up, for example: the land has to lay fallow IIRC for 5 years before it can be planted with any sort of organic crop. The cost of doing this to the farmer is high, plus they cannot spray the weeds off with Roundup every few months like they would otherwise do; these fields then have to be ploughed or weeds extracted manually (or just left, reducing yield significantly). So that obviously bumps up the price.

Frankly, if people knew the amount of Roundup that was being laced onto their foods they'd all go organic overnight. I reckon there is a clear taste difference between organic and non-organic foods too, it could just be the placebo effect, but I suspect this is why "home grown" always taste better.

That said, there's fat chance of Abdul over in Morocco adhering to organic standards for his crop sold here, as I don't think they have any sort of ratified organic standards in shitholes.

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24 minutes ago, spunko said:

If it's from the UK then organic standards are very strict if you look them up, for example: the land has to lay fallow IIRC for 5 years before it can be planted with any sort of organic crop. The cost of doing this to the farmer is high, plus they cannot spray the weeds off with Roundup every few months like they would otherwise do; these fields then have to be ploughed or weeds extracted manually (or just left, reducing yield significantly). So that obviously bumps up the price.

Frankly, if people knew the amount of Roundup that was being laced onto their foods they'd all go organic overnight. I reckon there is a clear taste difference between organic and non-organic foods too, it could just be the placebo effect, but I suspect this is why "home grown" always taste better.

That said, there's fat chance of Abdul over in Morocco adhering to organic standards for his crop sold here, as I don't think they have any sort of ratified organic standards in shitholes.

Yep, previously I’d dismissed it but, in reality, massive difference in taste and health benefits.

Due to availability I tend to prioritise salad and leafy green type vegetables over say onions and carrots that get peeled/cooked to death. Although I dare say that if there was heavy rainfall after the crop was sprayed it probably leeches in.

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I find it hard to source organic green leafy's at the moment so I just don't eat them.

There's pretty good info out there on which foods are worth paying extra for organic - generally things like avocado and green peas are ok to buy non-organic.

 

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Posted (edited)

Going to have to go against the tide in this thread. I find Tescos OK and improving for the items I need. 

Their steaks are good value and reliably tender, sandwiches decent quality (albeit a little pricey unless you opt for the £3 meal deal) - I realy like their mature cheddar / smoked ham /mayo bap  - and their ready-meals, esp. the "Taste of" (India, Thailand etc.) ranges are as good as it gets, IMO. The wines are also decent. Don't know about the bread as I use a proper craft bakers for that. Worst I can say about them is that they are generally overpriced, esp. the fruit which is why I try to hit the yellow-labels in the evenings.

IDShot_540x540.jpg?source=awin&awc=7052_

My main supermarket however is still Lidl.

 

Edited by Turned Out Nice Again

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This year I have started going for a more traditional type of salad with proper-sized tomatoes and whole lettuce leaves rather than the cherry tomatoes and rocket in a bag drizzled with oil nonsense.

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Just now, Panther said:

This year I have started going for a more traditional type of salad with proper-sized tomatoes and whole lettuce leaves rather than the cherry tomatoes and rocket in a bag drizzled with oil nonsense.

No-one can say Dosbodders don’t live life on the edge.

13 minutes ago, JoeDavola said:

I find it hard to source organic green leafy's at the moment so I just don't eat them.

There's pretty good info out there on which foods are worth paying extra for organic - generally things like avocado and green peas are ok to buy non-organic.

 

Aren’t there any Dunnes left where you are I always find them to have a fair range of good quality stuff quite a bit I wish you could get over here.

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3 minutes ago, SNACR said:

Aren’t there any Dunnes left where you are I always find them to have a fair range of good quality stuff quite a bit I wish you could get over here.

Yes there's a Dunnes in the city centre - will give it a look, thanks.

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15 minutes ago, Turned Out Nice Again said:

Going to have to go against the tide in this thread. I find Tescos OK and improving for the items I need. 

Their steaks are cheap and reliably tender, sandwiches good quality (albeit a little pricey unless you opt for the £3 meal deal) and their ready-meals, esp. the "Taste of" (India, Thailand etc.) ranges are as good as it gets, IMO. The wines are also decent. Don't know about the bread as I use a proper craft bakers for that. Worst I can say about them is that they are overpriced, esp. the fruit which is why I try to hit the yellow-labels in the evenings.

IDShot_540x540.jpg?source=awin&awc=7052_

My main supermarket however is still Lidl.

 

After M&S it’s my first pick for having the most of the type of stuff I’d put in my basket out of the mainstream ones. I find Sainsburys the worst for produce. 

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I’ve bought organic chicken or breasts etc a few times from various retailers. Only at a reduced price though. An organic corn fed chicken is much more expensive than the cheap stuff. I didn’t think it tasted much better though.

Regarding salmon I find farmed stuff unpalatable. Occasionally I’m gifted a solway caught salmon or treat myself to a local caught salmon steak. Not regularly available but the difference in taste and texture is very obvious IMO.

Vegetables I eat are locally or uk sourced whenever possible. Sometimes I do eat imported veg like avocado. I’ve grown veg for many years although not so many now due to downsizing, a smaller garden and easing off a bit. No vegetable can ever better one that’s home grown. I’m looking forward to digging up some potatoes, simmering them and eating them within 15-20 minutes of harvesting. Divine. A particular favourite of mine is broad beans. I never buy them because they’re horrible but I have some growing in the garden and know for sure I’ll enjoy them. Things like salad, garlic, carrots can be grown in a pot. A home grown freshly picked carrot or peas don’t need any cooking to taste heavenly. As for home grown tomatoes, depending on variety, superb.

IMO, bearing in mind I’m getting on in life, food just doesn’t generally taste as good as it used to. I was very lucky to have grown up being fed mainly on local meat, fish and veg. These days “fresh” staples can come from anywhere!

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4 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

I don't disagree but how do we actually know this means it's better quality or better for us?

This may or may not be the same across the country but I regularly hear down here the drum being banged about local produce, locally sourced meat, farmers' markets and so on.  All of which we're verbally assured means higher quality therefore we have to pay more for it.

I however don't see why the beef from a cow in Cornwall is intrinsically better for me than that from a cow from the Ukraine or Argentina; and given that it's local that means lower transportation costs so why isn't it cheaper instead of being more expensive?

It just comes across as a marketing scheme to get people to pay more for an identical product by branding it with meaningless words like "quality" and "wholesome".

Hopefully I am not `teaching you to suck eggs` (no pun intended), but for two reasons:

1. Intensive farmed meat usually means livestock is raised by maximum numbers of individuals possible per acre of land. As a result pathogen outbreaks are likely (same principle in humans I.e.cities/refugee camps and disease pandemics), so antibiotics/antihelminths/hard chemical treatments given as routine. Less of an issue if treatment is water soluble but if lipid (oil/fat) based can accrue in foodstuff.

2. Although early man evolved as omnivores (some vegans/vegetarians will tell you otherwise), animal protein formed a very small part of their diet (most came from fish/shellfish/veg based) AND they were very active/had high metabolism...Greek/Japanese diet is most similar nowadays and they unsurprisingly have the Worlds lowest diet related morbidities.

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P.s Organic produce?, yes you can make an argument for...organic honey?...well, unless you can guarantee every plant/field within a 6km radius is managed to organic standards the they are talking rubbish...plants can't move, Honey bees can!

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