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Leicester Uni puts 3800 on notice of redundancy-here we go....


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Insider tells me they went balls deep building student accomodation and decided to exclude normal partnership options so they could get 100% of the upside.

WIki says only 3910 employees in 2018/19 so only the top dogs are exempt.

 

 

https://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/news/leicester-news/job-cuts-loom-university-leicester-4612778

Wide-ranging job losses are likely at the University of Leicester under plans it has revealed this week.

The university has written to some 3,800 employees warning of potential compulsory redundancies as it seeks to ‘disinvest’ in some areas.

Vice-chancellor Professor Nishan Canagarajah has said the university’s new strategic plan is essential to secure its future as a ‘world-leading’ establishment.

The university has declined to say how many posts are at risk but in a letter to staff, seen by LeicestershireLive, Prof Canagarajah said: “With our centenary approaching and a new strategic plan underway this is the perfect moment to secure our second century.

“To compete on a global level we need to focus our efforts and build on our core strengths

“We can’t be excellent at everything.

 

“This means we need to make suitable investments in people and infrastructure to sustain and build on our position as a world-leading university.

“In order to do this we need to make some difficult decisions by disinvesting in certain areas of the university to sustain our areas of excellence and take advantage of emerging areas in research and education.”

The vice-chancellor said there had been significant changes in student demand for some courses with it growing in some areas but suffering long-term decline in others.

He added: “Some changes are now essential for our future success which may lead to compulsory redundancies.”

He said he and other senior figures had drawn up a list of affected areas where ‘we may need to refocus our activity, reduce what we are doing or cease our work completely.’

The listed impacted areas

  • School of Arts

  • School of Business

  • School of informatics

  • School of Mathematics and Actuarial Science

  • Department of Neuroscience, Psychology and Behaviour

A ‘reshaping’ of various professional services is planned in

  • Customer Services

  • Doctoral College and PGR Administration

  • Education Services

  • Estates and DIgital Services

  • Learning Services

  • Research and Enterprise Administration

“I recognise this will be a difficult period for those colleagues involved in any future changes," he said.

"I do not underestimate the impact this will have on colleagues across the university.

“I am not doing this lightly.

 

“Taking action now will protect us from further larger changes in the future and will enable us to be in control of our own destiny.”

The vice-chancellor said he would work with trade unions and the student unions as the plans develop over the coming months.

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makes me larf when the top dogs are exempt - ie the none productive parts are protected -ensures the ultimate end.

Insider tells me they went balls deep building student accomodation and decided to exclude normal partnership options so they could get 100% of the upside. WIki says only 3910 employees in 2018/1

Universities are pretty big businesses these days. I was at a conference last year at Cambridge (not name dropping - they will let anyone in to these conferences, if you pay. I hadn't been to a confer

Posted Images

15 minutes ago, Errol said:

How much does the Vice-chancellor get paid?

Their last published accounts are to July 2019.

The VC was only in place for 8 months and trousered £203k. That's north of £300k on an annualised basis. 

I presume that the current VC has negotiated something similar. He will have known how much the old VC was on.

Screenshot_2020-10-17-22-42-24.png

Edited by SpectrumFX
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15 minutes ago, SpectrumFX said:

Their last published accounts are to July 2019.

The VC was only in place for 8 months and trousered £203k. That's north of £300k on an annualised basis. 

I presume that the current VC has negotiated something similar. He will have known how much the old VC was on.

Screenshot_2020-10-17-22-42-24.png

I find it intriguing that there's only 90 people in the whole uni not on notice.

genuinely wondering how brutal this might get.

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average salary £47 k

Check out the pension liability that sinks 2019 to a £46mn deficit.Inteeresting rise in non current liabilites and provisons.

Also looks like student numbers were dropping even before covid.

I suspect a lot of their assets are student accomodation whoch will be worth a lot less going forward

 

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Edited by sancho panza
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6 minutes ago, sancho panza said:

leicester,De Montfort is next.

£250k plus pension....USS natch

He's cheap apprently.But probably not to us Dosbodders

Fantastic had a couple of run ins with there archeology unit and there jocks when I was younger I’ve even been a volunteer on a couple of digs the first was around 86 lol we go back a long way 

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1 minute ago, leonardratso said:

hmm i wonder what the 2020 figures look like now.

Everything's fine.

https://www.ft.com/content/1598dd15-9515-4af4-8e8a-884a21ebb451

The deficit at the UK’s largest private-sector pension fund, serving the pressured university sector, has more than doubled to £13bn as Covid-19 market turbulence ramped up the cost of retirement promises.

this_is_fine.jpg

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6 hours ago, leonardratso said:

makes me larf when the top dogs are exempt - ie the none productive parts are protected -ensures the ultimate end.

On the other hand it equally makes me laugh when some of the highest paid employees are the first or only ones to get offered redundancy... why are they paid so much in the first place if their roles can be so easily done without when cutbacks have to be made?

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4 hours ago, wherebee said:

Am I the first to ask what the fuck a University is doing with 4000 staff?  That's a pretty big company, if you actually had to make stuff.

I went to a Uni back in the day, and I am pretty sure the staff were under 500 to service all students and PHDs.

The vast majority of staff will not be teaching. All these organisations have morphed into empires for administrators.  

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1 hour ago, Royston said:

On the other hand it equally makes me laugh when some of the highest paid employees are the first or only ones to get offered redundancy... why are they paid so much in the first place if their roles can be so easily done without when cutbacks have to be made?

The government will be forced to bail them all out

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1 minute ago, stokiescum said:

The government will be forced to bail them all out

I suspect that's exactly what this whole redundancy consultation exercise (and no doubt many more to follow) is really all about, using the threat of exaggerated levels of redundancies to put pressure on ukgov for a hand out.

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8 hours ago, wherebee said:

Am I the first to ask what the fuck a University is doing with 4000 staff?  That's a pretty big company, if you actually had to make stuff.

I went to a Uni back in the day, and I am pretty sure the staff were under 500 to service all students and PHDs.

Universities are pretty big businesses these days. I was at a conference last year at Cambridge (not name dropping - they will let anyone in to these conferences, if you pay. I hadn't been to a conference for years, and now that feels like an age ago ... but anyway). I was shocked at how much building had been done, and I remarked to a couple of people there that universities these days seemed like devices for turning young people's debt into buildings and administrators' salaries. There was some embarrassed shuffling of feet, but also some acknowledgement that it wasn't a bad zeroth-order approximation.

On a related theme, several years ago, I visited a friend who is an academic at Nottingham university. He had sent some handouts down to the secretarial department to get them printed out. Anyway, there was some minor mess-up with loose pages, and they were refusing to do anything about it, so in the end I started disassembling and putting them back together, as there were only about 50 of the things to do. One of the secretaries then reluctantly joined in, and eventually everything was fine. However, afterwards, my friend said they keep running into problems like this, where it's very difficult to persuade the secretarial department to do anything for you at all, even if it's explicitly their job, or they have caused the problem in the first place.

So, I asked him what they actually did?, and he said he wasn't really sure. So, then I asked, why didn't they have a secretary for their group, who would be more available to do the things that needed doing? Well, it turned out that, of course, they do have a group secretary, but that a few years before, all these secretaries had been moved into one place, to form a "secretarial department", as that would be more efficient. So, now you have to go through the senior secretaries before you can ask "your" department's secretary to do anything. He said this was becoming quite a problem, so his professor was thinking of hiring a "local" secretary, who would actually sit in the department, and be able to deal with the immediate, departmental, work that needed doing.

I seem to remember Kafka wrote an expose about all this.

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1 hour ago, BurntBread said:

Universities are pretty big businesses these days. I was at a conference last year at Cambridge (not name dropping - they will let anyone in to these conferences, if you pay. I hadn't been to a conference for years, and now that feels like an age ago ... but anyway). I was shocked at how much building had been done, and I remarked to a couple of people there that universities these days seemed like devices for turning young people's debt into buildings and administrators' salaries. There was some embarrassed shuffling of feet, but also some acknowledgement that it wasn't a bad zeroth-order approximation.

On a related theme, several years ago, I visited a friend who is an academic at Nottingham university. He had sent some handouts down to the secretarial department to get them printed out. Anyway, there was some minor mess-up with loose pages, and they were refusing to do anything about it, so in the end I started disassembling and putting them back together, as there were only about 50 of the things to do. One of the secretaries then reluctantly joined in, and eventually everything was fine. However, afterwards, my friend said they keep running into problems like this, where it's very difficult to persuade the secretarial department to do anything for you at all, even if it's explicitly their job, or they have caused the problem in the first place.

So, I asked him what they actually did?, and he said he wasn't really sure. So, then I asked, why didn't they have a secretary for their group, who would be more available to do the things that needed doing? Well, it turned out that, of course, they do have a group secretary, but that a few years before, all these secretaries had been moved into one place, to form a "secretarial department", as that would be more efficient. So, now you have to go through the senior secretaries before you can ask "your" department's secretary to do anything. He said this was becoming quite a problem, so his professor was thinking of hiring a "local" secretary, who would actually sit in the department, and be able to deal with the immediate, departmental, work that needed doing.

I seem to remember Kafka wrote an expose about all this.

Isn't secretary a role which became redundant around 1990? Just the fact they have a secretarial department at all probably shows they have way too much money and no need to do anything remotely efficiently

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42 minutes ago, AlfredTheLittle said:

Isn't secretary a role which became redundant around 1990? Just the fact they have a secretarial department at all probably shows they have way too much money and no need to do anything remotely efficiently

Yes.

 

The only people that need a secretary now are chief execs or heads of region in very very firms who need someone to gatekeeper their diary and also write nice letters etc to other important people.

No one at uni needs a secretary.  If they do, they obviously are not in touch with the modern world that 99.9% of their students have to live in and should be sacked.

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5 minutes ago, wherebee said:

Yes.

 

The only people that need a secretary now are chief execs or heads of region in very very firms who need someone to gatekeeper their diary and also write nice letters etc to other important people.

No one at uni needs a secretary.  If they do, they obviously are not in touch with the modern world that 99.9% of their students have to live in and should be sacked.

Secretaries are basically banned in universities these days.

Some academics still have secretaries of course, but only as a demonstration of how very important they must be.

xD

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1 hour ago, BurntBread said:

Universities are pretty big businesses these days. I was at a conference last year at Cambridge (not name dropping - they will let anyone in to these conferences, if you pay. I hadn't been to a conference for years, and now that feels like an age ago ... but anyway). I was shocked at how much building had been done, and I remarked to a couple of people there that universities these days seemed like devices for turning young people's debt into buildings and administrators' salaries. There was some embarrassed shuffling of feet, but also some acknowledgement that it wasn't a bad zeroth-order approximation.

On a related theme, several years ago, I visited a friend who is an academic at Nottingham university. He had sent some handouts down to the secretarial department to get them printed out. Anyway, there was some minor mess-up with loose pages, and they were refusing to do anything about it, so in the end I started disassembling and putting them back together, as there were only about 50 of the things to do. One of the secretaries then reluctantly joined in, and eventually everything was fine. However, afterwards, my friend said they keep running into problems like this, where it's very difficult to persuade the secretarial department to do anything for you at all, even if it's explicitly their job, or they have caused the problem in the first place.

So, I asked him what they actually did?, and he said he wasn't really sure. So, then I asked, why didn't they have a secretary for their group, who would be more available to do the things that needed doing? Well, it turned out that, of course, they do have a group secretary, but that a few years before, all these secretaries had been moved into one place, to form a "secretarial department", as that would be more efficient. So, now you have to go through the senior secretaries before you can ask "your" department's secretary to do anything. He said this was becoming quite a problem, so his professor was thinking of hiring a "local" secretary, who would actually sit in the department, and be able to deal with the immediate, departmental, work that needed doing.

I seem to remember Kafka wrote an expose about all this.

They are all administrators now.  Afaict, their main job is compiling data for government and other quangos, proving that the organisation is doing their job (whatever that might be), getting themselves to the top of league tables and trying to claw in money.  

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14 hours ago, sancho panza said:

Vice-chancellor Professor Nishan Canagarajah has said the university’s new strategic plan is essential to secure its future as a ‘world-leading’ establishment.

World-leading!!! xD

Sadly all of these unis will be classed as too big to fail and have billions more tax payer cash chucked at them.

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