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Weird main photo on Rightmove


spunko
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The whole house is so nondescript and bland that it must have taken vast amounts of work to make an old house resemble the most anonymous of new builds.

Here's the lead picture.  I'm not even sure what that is - is it a TV playing a video of a fire?

Awful.  Straight into the skip.

2208_12720887_IMG_04_0000.JPG

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43 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

The whole house is so nondescript and bland that it must have taken vast amounts of work to make an old house resemble the most anonymous of new builds.

Here's the lead picture.  I'm not even sure what that is - is it a TV playing a video of a fire?

Awful.  Straight into the skip.

2208_12720887_IMG_04_0000.JPG

It is a new-build, surely? 

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35 minutes ago, Craig said:

Either way, it's a mess. That extension is farcical. Why build that only to have a galley kitchen and a long, narrow dining room?!

I think it will have great appeal to your keen ten pin bowler.

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There are lots of properties like this. Either 'designed' by a developer or upgraded and extended to be sold on. No thought at all about how someone would actually live in it.

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3 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

The whole house is so nondescript and bland that it must have taken vast amounts of work to make an old house resemble the most anonymous of new builds.

Here's the lead picture.  I'm not even sure what that is - is it a TV playing a video of a fire?

Awful.  Straight into the skip.

2208_12720887_IMG_04_0000.JPG

It struck me as very strange as well, the satin white Torus skirting board and magnolia walls aren't really generic enough alone so they added a generic electric fire.

If it were one of these, I could understand it, just about...

9d2d5b316d99b4ae95e1ccb8c66448b6.jpg

 

 

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Even if this house were cheap I wouldn't buy it.  I hate modern houses like these.  They also remind me of shitty made in China stuff where in just a few short years it will fall to bits.

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On 18/12/2020 at 18:00, Iamcynical said:

Even if this house were cheap I wouldn't buy it.  I hate modern houses like these.  They also remind me of shitty made in China stuff where in just a few short years it will fall to bits.

The quality of life has to be somewhat reduced by the tiny room sizes, I don't know if there has ever been a study into the psychogical effects of small living spaces in this country but there should be.

Another legal requirement should be to put clearly the sq/ft floorspan for every property. A lot of new builds leave it out, for obvious reasons - gubbermint could easily crack down on this but don't care. New builds are the veneer holding up the remains of a hollowed-out, decimated economy.

Mr & Mrs Boomer must have their nice new home to retire to, as they're too lazy to decorate and can even pick the colour of the walls to be painted for them!

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Bobthebuilder
On 18/12/2020 at 13:50, Sasquatch said:

There are lots of properties like this. Either 'designed' by a developer or upgraded and extended to be sold on. No thought at all about how someone would actually live in it.

One like that near me at the moment. Double rear extension to add more space to back bedroom and kitchen / open plan diner. They could have taken the roof off and gained enough height for a 4 bed on the original size. Its nice and flash with the rear extension but no more room really for all the effort.

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Bus Stop Boxer
3 hours ago, spunko said:

The quality of life has to be somewhat reduced by the tiny room sizes, I don't know if there has ever been a study into the psychogical effects of small living spaces in this country but there should be.

Another legal requirement should be to put clearly the sq/ft floorspan for every property. A lot of new builds leave it out, for obvious reasons - gubbermint could easily crack down on this but don't care. New builds are the veneer holding up the remains of a hollowed-out, decimated economy.

Mr & Mrs Boomer must have their nice new home to retire to, as they're too lazy to decorate and can even pick the colour of the walls to be painted for them!

I have had my house for sale for quite a while. All 3 beds are proper doubles. Unoverlooked. Verdant outlook.

IM NOT GIVING IT AWAY but it still bewilders me what people buy in its stead. New build hutches in the main.

I would not look twice, at what is bought as an alternative to my place in the price bracket.

Odd.

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12 hours ago, Bus Stop Boxer said:

I have had my house for sale for quite a while. All 3 beds are proper doubles. Unoverlooked. Verdant outlook.

IM NOT GIVING IT AWAY but it still bewilders me what people buy in its stead. New build hutches in the main.

I would not look twice, at what is bought as an alternative to my place in the price bracket.

Odd.

 

Most people these days look at surface things; we have gone the Chinese way in valuing newness above all other considerations.

New mobile phone, new clothes, new car, new house.

And by new I mean brand new or, if a house, appearing to be so.

If you want your house to sell at the price you know it is worth then entirely redecorate it, fit a new kitchen and bathroom, and where possible make bedrooms en-suite.

It might cost you £40k but will add £100k to the selling price.

My parents had the same experience in selling their house but, not wanting the hassle of work men around for months, instead accepted a lower price.

I don't know if it is younger people with this "must have new" above all other considerations attitude or whether it is across the board but it baffles me when a solid older house with big rooms and a decent garden is priced lower than a smaller newbuild or even a flat.

Although given that my next move is intended to be to somewhere bigger then I welcome that because a substantial old house with land is exactly what I want and it sounds like it will be cheap.

(I'm not buying yours though - I doubt I'll even start looking for another five or more years). 

 

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Bus Stop Boxer
2 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

 

Most people these days look at surface things; we have gone the Chinese way in valuing newness above all other considerations.

New mobile phone, new clothes, new car, new house.

And by new I mean brand new or, if a house, appearing to be so.

If you want your house to sell at the price you know it is worth then entirely redecorate it, fit a new kitchen and bathroom, and where possible make bedrooms en-suite.

It might cost you £40k but will add £100k to the selling price.

My parents had the same experience in selling their house but, not wanting the hassle of work men around for months, instead accepted a lower price.

I don't know if it is younger people with this "must have new" above all other considerations attitude or whether it is across the board but it baffles me when a solid older house with big rooms and a decent garden is priced lower than a smaller newbuild or even a flat.

Although given that my next move is intended to be to somewhere bigger then I welcome that because a substantial old house with land is exactly what I want and it sounds like it will be cheap.

(I'm not buying yours though - I doubt I'll even start looking for another five or more years). 

 

I think i have to agree. Ive been holding back on any major improvements but will re-evaluate in new year.

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8 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

 

Most people these days look at surface things; we have gone the Chinese way in valuing newness above all other considerations.

New mobile phone, new clothes, new car, new house.

And by new I mean brand new or, if a house, appearing to be so.

If you want your house to sell at the price you know it is worth then entirely redecorate it, fit a new kitchen and bathroom, and where possible make bedrooms en-suite.

It might cost you £40k but will add £100k to the selling price.

My parents had the same experience in selling their house but, not wanting the hassle of work men around for months, instead accepted a lower price.

I don't know if it is younger people with this "must have new" above all other considerations attitude or whether it is across the board but it baffles me when a solid older house with big rooms and a decent garden is priced lower than a smaller newbuild or even a flat.

Although given that my next move is intended to be to somewhere bigger then I welcome that because a substantial old house with land is exactly what I want and it sounds like it will be cheap.

(I'm not buying yours though - I doubt I'll even start looking for another five or more years). 

 

I genuinely do think that a large segment of people aged between 45 and 75 think that DIY is below them. It's what their parents did, not them .

And then there's loads of people aged 45 and under who just don't have a clue and don't care. They'll call in the trades to put up a shelf.

Edited by spunko
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Chewing Grass
On 18/12/2020 at 10:54, Frank Hovis said:

The whole house is so nondescript and bland that it must have taken vast amounts of work to make an old house resemble the most anonymous of new builds.

Here's the lead picture.  I'm not even sure what that is - is it a TV playing a video of a fire?

Awful.  Straight into the skip.

2208_12720887_IMG_04_0000.JPG

Bloke at work has just bought one of them as his new build flat has no chimney (obviously) cost him £3000 and he got it cheap, took him and 3 of his mates to hump it up the stairs and he still has to get somebody else to build a fake wall to fit it.

Apparently there is a heater behind it that 'projects radiance and warm air into the room'.

Whatever.

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On 22/12/2020 at 20:02, Chewing Grass said:

Bloke at work has just bought one of them as his new build flat has no chimney (obviously) cost him £3000 and he got it cheap, took him and 3 of his mates to hump it up the stairs and he still has to get somebody else to build a fake wall to fit it.

Apparently there is a heater behind it that 'projects radiance and warm air into the room'.

Whatever.

Like one of these does? 56945.jpg

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On 22/12/2020 at 20:02, Chewing Grass said:

Bloke at work has just bought one of them as his new build flat has no chimney (obviously) cost him £3000 and he got it cheap, took him and 3 of his mates to hump it up the stairs and he still has to get somebody else to build a fake wall to fit it.

Apparently there is a heater behind it that 'projects radiance and warm air into the room'.

Whatever.

I quite like them, but I'd never pay the prices they demand. If they were £400 or so I'd probably seriously consider one; I can't see the justification for £3k.

BTW, the EA has updated the photo. this is now the primary one:

Kitchen

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On 22/12/2020 at 20:49, spunko said:

I genuinely do think that a large segment of people aged between 45 and 75 think that DIY is below them. It's what their parents did, not them .

And then there's loads of people aged 45 and under who just don't have a clue and don't care. They'll call in the trades to put up a shelf.

Same with cars, I recently bought a run around car for use in the UK when I'm there, 2005 Mini Cooper S.

Bought it for a few hundred quid as it was overheating, air con not working and leaking oil.

New rad, new crank sensor oil seal, rocker cover gasket, water pump and gasket set. Changed the supercharger oil, new belt and timing chain tensioner, cooling fan resistor replaced (fixed the air con) and all fluids £300 and took a few hours.

Now valued at £3000-£3500 or, for my purposes a few years trouble free motoring.

My son helped but all his pals thought he was crazy, "That's what dealers are for"

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Bobthebuilder
4 hours ago, spunko said:

I quite like them, but I'd never pay the prices they demand. If they were £400 or so I'd probably seriously consider one; I can't see the justification for £3k.

BTW, the EA has updated the photo. this is now the primary one:

Kitchen

Nicely fitted gas oven, shame ventilation requirements are not met. FAIL.

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