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1970s houses - are they any good?


spunko

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Well I guess it's 1970s. Here's a few photos.

Screenshot 2022-11-23 at 19-53-36 tinto.doc - doc_0_0.pdf.png

Screenshot 2022-11-23 at 19-54-15 tinto.doc - doc_0_0.pdf.png

Screenshot 2022-11-23 at 19-54-25 tinto.doc - doc_0_0.pdf.png

Considering moving again, might not, just an idea - but this property has piqued my interest. I would have avoided a property like this before but since living in an older place and completely renovating it (some myself, some not), I don't mind a challenge.

Problem is, are properties like this any good structurally, or are they a complete liability? I don't mean the pine panelling, of course that can be removed, I mean in terms of extending, knocking down walls, can it be insulated etc. Looking at the photos this property hasn't been renovated since about 1981. Is that a warning sign? Anyone got a similar property please?

 

 

 

Screenshot 2022-11-23 at 19-58-28 Check out this 4 bedroom detached house for sale on Rightmove.png

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The gardens etc are piss easy for me so not of any concern. Changing the kitchen, bathrooms etc isn't too hard. Rewiring I suspect will need to be done, but won't know until I view it.

If I do buy it, don't worry @King Penda I will burn all that furniture just for you.

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Arguably the pinnacle of post war UK housing. Massive plots, big windows, big rooms, high ceilings, cavity walls and solid foundations. The thinking man's purchase, if you can look beyond the dated exterior aesthetics to see potential and value.

If the kerb appeal defecit is a big issue for you, then this mob have some interesting ideas for how the outside could be made more appealing/contemporary:

https://www.backtofrontexteriordesign.com/before-after

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Chewing Grass
11 minutes ago, spunko said:

Well I guess it's 1970s. Here's a few photos.

Screenshot 2022-11-23 at 19-53-36 tinto.doc - doc_0_0.pdf.png

Screenshot 2022-11-23 at 19-54-15 tinto.doc - doc_0_0.pdf.png

Screenshot 2022-11-23 at 19-54-25 tinto.doc - doc_0_0.pdf.png

Considering moving again, might not, just an idea - but this property has piqued my interest. I would have avoided a property like this before but since living in an older place and completely renovating it (some myself, some not), I don't mind a challenge.

Problem is, are properties like this any good structurally, or are they a complete liability? I don't mean the pine panelling, of course that can be removed, I mean in terms of extending, knocking down walls, can it be insulated etc. Looking at the photos this property hasn't been renovated since about 1981. Is that a warning sign? Anyone got a similar property please?

 

 

 

Screenshot 2022-11-23 at 19-58-28 Check out this 4 bedroom detached house for sale on Rightmove.png

Yes, I'm living in one built in 1962 so the first of this style. I will caveat it with the fact it has a traditionally constructed roof with two massive purlins front and rear of the roof and not preformed trusses, probably one of the last built that way.

Built on a raft foundation it is structurally fine even though it is built out of lightweight London brick although a few had shaled below the damp course on the North facing wall (it is mingingly damp oop North) which didn't matter as that's where we stuck the extension.

Energy wise it is OK even though a survey by some tosser would probably say it isn't but they won't know the inner leaf is Ziegel blockwork, unusual stuff that is basicly hollow terracotta pot blocks so a reasonably insulator but shit for letting electrics into as you have to smash the block face and fill with cement to fix back boxes.

I'd treat each one on its merits after a good looky-see.

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3 minutes ago, JoeDavola said:

That's a fecking brilliant house. They'll never build the likes of that again.

It is really the perfect location that piqued my interest: right near a forest for walking with my dogs, away from any pikeys, in a leafy but local/small town, and a Wetherspoons within walking distance.

*I may have given a bit too much away here, someone can probably guess where it is now!

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2 minutes ago, spunko said:

It is really the perfect location that piqued my interest: right near a forest for walking with my dogs, away from any pikeys, in a leafy but local/small town, and a Wetherspoons within walking distance.

*I may have given a bit too much away here, someone can probably guess where it is now!

It's not even the house that caught my eye but more the site that it's on. The feeling of owning your own little part of the world and having a bit of privacy vs the battery-hen newbuilds where even detached houses are crammed right together.

If you enjoy DIY then I'd go for it, and the pub within walking distance is a major plus, it's one of the things that has influenced the area I'm hoping to buy in.

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1 minute ago, JoeDavola said:

It's not even the house that caught my eye but more the site that it's on. The feeling of owning your own little part of the world and having a bit of privacy vs the battery-hen newbuilds where even detached houses are crammed right together.

If you enjoy DIY then I'd go for it, and the pub within walking distance is a major plus, it's one of the things that has influenced the area I'm hoping to buy in.

I always thought I'd be happy living on an island by myself until I moved to where I live now. As nice as it is in summer, I hate it in winter. Pitch black out of all the windows from 4pm onwards, it would be nice to be a bit nearer to other people. Definitely a fine balance though, I've lived in new builds before and can't see how I managed it looking back as they're so claustrophobic.

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41 minutes ago, spunko said:

Well I guess it's 1970s. Here's a few photos.

Screenshot 2022-11-23 at 19-53-36 tinto.doc - doc_0_0.pdf.png

Screenshot 2022-11-23 at 19-54-15 tinto.doc - doc_0_0.pdf.png

Screenshot 2022-11-23 at 19-54-25 tinto.doc - doc_0_0.pdf.png

Considering moving again, might not, just an idea - but this property has piqued my interest. I would have avoided a property like this before but since living in an older place and completely renovating it (some myself, some not), I don't mind a challenge.

Problem is, are properties like this any good structurally, or are they a complete liability? I don't mean the pine panelling, of course that can be removed, I mean in terms of extending, knocking down walls, can it be insulated etc. Looking at the photos this property hasn't been renovated since about 1981. Is that a warning sign? Anyone got a similar property please?

 

 

 

Screenshot 2022-11-23 at 19-58-28 Check out this 4 bedroom detached house for sale on Rightmove.png

These are the last of the reasonably built houses. Look out for floorboards, yes nice board boards instead of chip board. Then decent solid internal walls (a mixed blessing but a good indication of build quality).

In terms of design they lack the beauty of Victorian, Edwardian or indeed 1930’s homes……but they are often practical. 
 

A key too is when they are dated they look awful (whereas Victorian houses look great when knackered)…….but that’s good because it means less people fight for them. And once renovated the Victorian house still looks good…..whereas this goes from awful to good.

These are the houses I used to buy to renovate…..much cheaper to buy and to renovate than an old Victorian place. 

Caveat of course is you check it is as I describe…….there were shit builders in all eras.  

Edited by Pip321
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4 minutes ago, Pip321 said:

These are the last of the reasonably built houses. Look out for floorboards, yes nice board boards instead of chip board. Then decent solid internal walls (a mixed blessing but a good indication of build quality).

In terms of design they lack the beauty of Victorian, Edwardian or indeed 1930’s homes……but they are often practical. 
 

A key too is when they are dated they look awful (whereas Victorian houses look great when knackered)…….but that’s good because it means less people fight for them. And once renovated the Victorian house still looks good…..whereas this goes from awful to good.

These are the houses I used to buy to renovate…..much cheaper than an old Victorian place. 

Caveat of course is you check it is as I describe…….there were shit builders in all eras.  

I assume it is almsot impossible to tell if a builder is shit from photos and really you are already moved in by the time you find out there's been bodging. All a bit of a lottery. The good sign is that it's in a a fairly salubrious town so hopefully they didn't use cowboys. 

It isn't helped by the fact there is no history with this property that I can find, it has been owned by the same family since new. And it looks like a probate so the people who might have done DIY work are no longer with us :S

 

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Our house is this era, built in 1966, and specifically picked as it was solidly built, good sized rooms with reasonable insulation. I love the brick built interior walls, gives the whole house a solid feeling, but one thing to watch out for is all the asbestos they used at that time.

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1 minute ago, spunko said:

I assume it is almsot impossible to tell if a builder is shit from photos and really you are already moved in by the time you find out there's been bodging. All a bit of a lottery. The good sign is that it's in a a fairly salubrious town so hopefully they didn't use cowboys. 

It isn't helped by the fact there is no history with this property that I can find, it has been owned by the same family since new. And it looks like a probate so the people who might have done DIY work are no longer with us :S

 

All I meant was checking for floorboards, solid walls etc. If walls are honeycomb plasterboards like in the 70’s and there is chipboard down then maybe it’s not a good as we all suspect it might be. Normally this era is pretty good. 👍

The rest is then down to the surveyor and tradesman’s advice.

Personally I like Edwardian stone…….but if someone were buying one of these (and they like them) then I wouldn’t disagree. I know lots around me built in this style and they look great when modernised. 

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1 minute ago, Pip321 said:

All I meant was checking for floorboards, solid walls etc. If walls are honeycomb plasterboards like in the 70’s and there is chipboard down then maybe it’s not a good as we all suspect it might be. Normally this era is pretty good. 👍

The rest is then down to the surveyor and tradesman’s advice.

Personally I like Edwardian stone…….but if someone were buying one of these (and they like them) then I wouldn’t disagree. I know lots around me built in this style and they look great when modernised. 

Are you able to provide a few images from Street View please without identifying where it is? I'd love to see what these look like when renovated (externally) as I can't really visualise it. All that Google brings is up (IMO) these horrible fake clad things.

 

Screenshot 2022-11-23 at 20-51-55 late 60s house renovation - Google Search.png

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3 minutes ago, spunko said:

Are you able to provide a few images from Street View please without identifying where it is? I'd love to see what these look like when renovated (externally) as I can't really visualise it. All that Google brings is up (IMO) these horrible fake clad things.

 

Screenshot 2022-11-23 at 20-51-55 late 60s house renovation - Google Search.png

I meant they look great internally. Outside they are what they are……although the current fashion is render and grey windows. Personally I don’t mind them as they are. They are 1960’s….bit dull maybe but really practical and I see the odd one that’s externally renovated as they look like they are trying too hard. 
 

Example of a half decent renovation but personally I liked it before. 
 

 

D4D0E16C-F78A-4C78-9999-5990128FE2CF.jpeg

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I live in a house built in 69/70 and this is the third home I've had from that period.  Fairly well built and all good size windows to let natural light in.

My comments on your one.

No chimneys so they must have had a good gas supply from new. N. Sea gas was not really available till late 60s.

The top half looks likely to be tiles. So could be solid wall on bottom then timber framed for top? This property wasn't originally a bungalow then extended upwards?

Wiring should be good (pvc) but sockets could be few and far between. Check to see if consumer unit has been updated. Mine still in bakerlight box with replaceable fuse wire!

The steps at the rear take the ground to a higher level but building looks level. Hopefully well damp proofed.

I'm not a builder by the way!

 

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8 minutes ago, F150 said:

Probably higher chance of a non car dependent location as well, compared to the HORRIFIC new build streets of post 2000

I will sell my car if I move there, and cycle without a helmet everywhere, it is the DOSBODS way.

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50 minutes ago, spunko said:

I always thought I'd be happy living on an island by myself until I moved to where I live now. As nice as it is in summer, I hate it in winter. Pitch black out of all the windows from 4pm onwards, it would be nice to be a bit nearer to other people. Definitely a fine balance though, I've lived in new builds before and can't see how I managed it looking back as they're so claustrophobic.

Agreed. Especially when you live alone I think it's better to be near some sort of communal area where you can dander about and be around people, even if you aren't the most sociable of people.

This is why I stayed in the city centre all these years; endless suburbia where you are lost in a sea of semi's or detached family homes never appealed as I'd have felt isolated.

So I think the trick is to find somewhere like you say that has somewhat of a village feel, even if it's just one or two streets that have a few shops and a pub or two in them. Even if I was a driver I'd not want to have to get into my car to go and do anything, I'd much prefer to be able to dander over to the pub or cafe or shop on foot.

The place I have my eye on has that, though it's about an hour's train from Belfast which I'm still not sure about. The only thing is that the population in it does seem to be heavily biased towards very old people.

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Joncrete Cungle

Our house was built in 1964, the original house is still sound as a pound. The issues have been in the early 1990's extensions. The difference in workmanship & quality of the construction is night and day. Proper sized rooms, proper sized plot, driveway, garage and shed. Front garden, side garden and back garden.

Decent sized windows, cavity walls, the original roof is still good. Original floor is better than the extensions floor. Have added extra insulation in the loft. Decent wide roads with room to pass parked cars. Open green spaces, kids playground, football pitch and woodland, paths on the doorstep.

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2 minutes ago, Joncrete Cungle said:

Our house was built in 1964, the original house is still sound as a pound. The issues have been in the early 1990's extensions. The difference in workmanship & quality of the construction is night and day. Proper sized rooms, proper sized plot, driveway, garage and shed. Front garden, side garden and back garden.

Decent sized windows, cavity walls, the original roof is still good. Original floor is better than the extensions floor. Have added extra insulation in the loft. Decent wide roads with room to pass parked cars. Open green spaces, kids playground, football pitch and woodland, paths on the doorstep.

Cheers. How secure would you say they are, that is another concern for me as I'm still a bit paranoid after getting burgled, they all seem to have large patio doors !

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2 minutes ago, spunko said:

they all seem to have large patio doors !

Equally possible to convert patio doors to a window as to go the other (more common) way. Bricks and plaster, pretty trivial if you are already renovating/redecorating etc.

Obviously only worth it for a forever home though, as you would be removing value to most buyers.

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Joncrete Cungle
1 minute ago, spunko said:

Cheers. How secure would you say they are, that is another concern for me as I'm still a bit paranoid after getting burgled, they all seem to have large patio doors !

I changed all the locks to 3 star anti snap locks when we moved in and got a Patlock for the patio doors. One of the reasons I wanted this house was the mature Hawthorn hedge that forms all the border between the property and the road / footpath and the fence / gate by the drive, privacy and security. I added a 7ft tall wrought iron gate that locks at the front.

All the windows are double glazed and can be locked. We have been burgled twice in the past in rented places. We have had zero problems since moving here. There has been the odd bit of crime locally (scrotes had been cycling from the nearest city along a disused railway line that is now a cycle path at night to try car doors and house doors, garage doors & shed doors). Good neighbours and a community make it safe. If your paranoid about burglars like me, look at the house like a burglar. How would you approach the house, how would you try to break in? How easy will it be to reinforce the boundary to keep scrotes at bay?

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1 hour ago, Joncrete Cungle said:

I changed all the locks to 3 star anti snap locks when we moved in and got a Patlock for the patio doors. One of the reasons I wanted this house was the mature Hawthorn hedge that forms all the border between the property and the road / footpath and the fence / gate by the drive, privacy and security. I added a 7ft tall wrought iron gate that locks at the front.

All the windows are double glazed and can be locked. We have been burgled twice in the past in rented places. We have had zero problems since moving here. There has been the odd bit of crime locally (scrotes had been cycling from the nearest city along a disused railway line that is now a cycle path at night to try car doors and house doors, garage doors & shed doors). Good neighbours and a community make it safe. If your paranoid about burglars like me, look at the house like a burglar. How would you approach the house, how would you try to break in? How easy will it be to reinforce the boundary to keep scrotes at bay?

A tall hedge is a plus for an intruder as they can operate out of sight of the road.  The best is a pickly hedge about 4 feet tall - stops people getting through, but if they work on windows or doors they can be seen.

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17 minutes ago, wherebee said:

A tall hedge is a plus for an intruder as they can operate out of sight of the road.  The best is a pickly hedge about 4 feet tall - stops people getting through, but if they work on windows or doors they can be seen.

Depends on your school of thought. A 4ft hedge will reveal who is or isn't in, from the roadside.

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